Archive for the Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing Category

Lullabies – Sleep Songs

Posted in Poems, Poems, Rhymes, Riddles, Song Lyrics & Analysis, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on February 24, 2019 by Drogo

Sleep Song by Drogo

 

My mind is almost gone,

I don’t know what’s going on.

Lulled by a lovely tune,

I will be asleep soon.

Some way, some how,

I am going to the land of sleep now.

 

Good-night.

 

*

 

more to be added when im awake….

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Incredible Hulk Psychology

Posted in Cartoon Comics, Fictional Characters, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2019 by Drogo

Incredible_Hulk_Vol_1_273

This essay is from a SCOD video on the Marvel Hulk comic-books. Is the system working for you? Do you work for the system? Do you have a balance?? Dr. Banner worked within the nuclear science field, and was cursed with the alter-ego of the Hulk after a gamma-bomb test radiation accident. The main over-arching human theme of the ‘System vs Individuals’ originated because the military industrial complex created the Hulk, and Banner uses technology to handle his Hulk problem, but he is always chased by the military as a terrorist because the The Incredible Hulk was very aggressively anarchist libertarian (in effect by savage nature, not due to political ideology) due to his resistance to authority and desire to be left alone. In ‘Marvel: Five Fabulous Decades of the World’s Greatest Comics’Les Daniels addresses the Hulk as an embodiment of cultural fears of radiation and nuclear science. He quotes Jack Kirby: “As long as we’re experimenting with radioactivity, there’s no telling what may happen, or how much our advancements in science may cost us.” Daniels continues, “The Hulk became Marvel’s most disturbing embodiment of the perils inherent in the atomic age.”

The main character core theme for individual psychology is obviously anger (but also fear) as one part of the aggressive/passive dichotomy paradigm; because anger is the main catalyst for his change, and calmness allows the beast to sleep within him again. A third theme might be danger/safety (violence/gentleness), survival regardless of emotions. A fourth theme could be the stoic sadness of living with guilt and responsibility for problems. Humans are animals, but we seek to control our id, ego, and emotions for the sake of society and civilization. The Hulk deals with debates about man and monster, where does one personality end and the other begin??  Oddly enough, his rage doesn’t make him evil or the antagonist in the story. Can he be both a hero and an anti-hero?? Originally the Hulk transformed at night (1962), then randomly. It was not until after about the 30th comic book (1966) with Hulk in it [Tales To Astonish #80], that ANGER became his main catalyst for transformation. Hulk influenced popular culture so much, that the term ‘hulk out’ means to get enraged and rampage. “Don’t make me angry; you won’t like me when I’m angry.” – Dr. Banner (TV show)

Dr. Banner is a scientist dealing with some serious mental issues. As he evolves, so does his monstrous manifestation. The egos of the various incarnations exist within Banner, as Banner exists within them. The metaphor being that our different personality aspects and phases of life exist within us. Who we ‘really are’ does not have to be limited to just one personality, or set of emotional responses. I actually cannot think of a depiction that does not consider them within each-other as they are obviously connected, even if they are also beings in their individual ways.

The Jekyll-Hyde story is not just about literal appearance differences; also about mental disorders and addiction, physical (chemical) and mental bi-polar and border-line… all kinds of things to think about with split-personality concepts (not the diagnosis but the reality of how emotions can be overly intense with many people, making them seem like different people when they experience them).

[More will be added later to this article, like illustrations of the Evolution of Hulk; and more story plot points and descriptions.]

Youtube video:  Incredible Hulk Comics 1970-1990

Youtube video:  Incredible Hulk fan tribute collage – ‘evolution montage’

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basement Dwellers

Posted in Fictional Stories, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on January 19, 2019 by Drogo

The People In the Basement

Troglodytes in Harpers Faery

 

When I was a kid we lived in a large three story house with a full basement. The people in the basement where enigmatic, and could only be seen surreptitiously. Were they obsequious knockers or spiteful sprites? Were the mysterious people good or bad; benevolent or belligerent? Most of our family friends did not realize we had a basement, since we rarely showed it to company on house tours. The basement was a place of forgetting, where my parents would put things when they did not know what to do with important things or messes. Our basement was an oubliette of mathoms.

The people in the basement stayed hidden most of the time in cabinets that they would close themselves into. My mother and my friend were the first to tell me about them, because I had not seen any strange things like that in the basement myself (when I was awake). I had many nightmares of being chased by monsters in the house, and very vividly real dreams of seeing ghosts; but as far as i could recall i do not remember actually seeing those things while awake. In old houses strange noises are common, as well as ghost stories. so I assumed that what they had seen we’re ghosts. my mother insisted that they were real people.

One day I asked my mother to describe these basement people to me in detail.  she said ” well they only come out at night and move around when no one else is there. There are  animals also, I’ve seen them come up from the Cellar Door outside. your father and I had been up all night cleaning the basement, when out of the corner of my eye I saw a person walking on the other side of the room. As I turned to look at them they opened this bottom drawer here, stepped inside and pulled the door shut. I think they drink bottles of Visine, because I found an empty one near the cabinets.”

– written by Drogo Empedocles

 

[ please purchase Drogo’s books or sponsor him on Patreon to read the rest of this story ]

The Princess with Colored Hair

Posted in Fictional Stories, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 10, 2019 by Drogo

There once was a princess who was born with an unusual color of hair. Every night when it was time for bed, her mother the Queen would put lavender under her pillow. The magic smell of lavender reminded her that she was safe and helped the Princess to sleep. This ritual tradition was very comforting to the Princess, and she practiced it all her life.

 

One night her mother was not home and no one remembered to put lavender under her pillow. Everyone had gone to bed but the Princess, but she remembered that lavender grew in the garden below her window. So she opened her window and grabbed hold of the lattice work with vines to climb down. Guard dogs began to bark across the garden courtyard. She told them to hush, but in the moon-light the dogs could see her colored hair and thought she was a witch so they barked even louder! Oh no, she thought, i will get in trouble with my father the King for sure.

 

However some trooping goblins also saw her hair in the moon-light and thought she was a witch. Goblins love witches so they cast a spell to silence the dogs. The Princess reached the lavender bush and picked some stems. With sticky hands she thanked the goblins and climbed back up to her window. She put the lavender under her pillow, and fell fast asleep. From that night onward, The Princess was never without bags of lavender which she stored with her clothing in cabinets, to always have some lavender to put under her pillow every night; whether her mother was with her or not. In fact the secret of magic of her lavender spell was that the spirit of her mother was always with her so long as her herb bags were full.

Philosophical Anarchism

Posted in Cooperative collaboration, Critical Commentary of Civilization, ecovillages, Legal / Laws, Sustainability, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 29, 2018 by Drogo

Anarchy is absence of supreme government leaders, company authorities, or laws. Anarchism is rejection of central state or group hierarchy for collaborative democracy and independent freedom. Anarchy does not mean ‘let chaos rule’, but can be messy as individuals express themselves voluntarily. Lack of direction from a boss can be scary for many who prefer to be told what to do. Another problem is the political vacuum of anarchy allows despots to use charisma and power to shatter the ideal potential of anarchy and democracy, and create populist structures of obedience to corrupt state systems.

Anarchy is a natural feeling for many people who have an intuitive reaction to any perceived authority over them; which maybe related to our pre-history. Civilization is considered new and brief compared to thousands and thousands of years when humans must have lived more or less like other wild animals with no writing, and no language rules, in primitive anarchy. This anti-authoritarian type of human nature can manifest in complex egalitarian cultures, and thus can create advanced anarchy systems based on cultural capacities. Proudhon considered anarchism to be a political philosophy for “stateless societies based on voluntary associations”. Having no desire for authoritarian companies or governments, anarchists often try to organize and maintain voluntary institutions (like SCOD).

Labor unions (aka trade unions) are groups or collectives of workers, organized to represent their job interests within capitalism. Unions are similar to trade guilds, except they are often employees of companies that need to negotiate with bosses using social pressure and collective protest bargaining, with threat of striking vs lay-offs to enforce contracts. Safety standards, living wages, and benefits are labor themes.

Philosophical anarchism often relates to democracy, communism, socialism, and labor unions because they all are systems to empower workers to control leaders, companies, and governments by the people being responsible for their power. The term ‘worker’ (proletariat) represents the bulk of citizens or their families, and therefore the masses of society. When the workers have to power to vote directly and frequently on their bosses, companies and governments become decentralized and depend on social networks and sub-cultures.

anarchy

[see also Mondragon, Mother Jones, Emma Goldman]

The Horror of Lovecraft

Posted in Book Reports, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing, Memorials / Obituaries / Epitaphs, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on October 19, 2018 by Drogo

The thing about writing horror is that you basically admit you are really sick and twisted. His racist writing describes accurately how people like him would think as they narrate the events. For me it shows how the concept of evil is a human perspective, based on what we fear; from fish people to aliens. To write about your fears shows your weakness and vulnerabilities, in my opinion. Lovecraft shows how fear is a scary illness from hating ethnic differences to being petrified of anything resembling fish or squids. Another aspect of Lovecraft is that his “heroes” do not ever really “win” against the demonic powers that spread, as migrants in NY did while he was living there, and they were thriving while he was failing. Clearly Lovecraft shows how conservative culture always dies of entropy as progressive immigrants take over, for better or worse, depending on who you are. That he describes the changes in culture as evil in fictional demonic terms exaggerates his own feelings to an absurd level of parody, which i feel he must have been conscious about to marry a Jew.

RIP H.P. Lovecraft  1890-1937

Power Corrupts People

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization, Education / Schools, Ethics & Morals, History, Recommendations & Tributes, Spiritual, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 15, 2018 by Drogo

Baron J.E.E. Dalberg-Acton (aka Lord Acton 1834-1902) was a noble English Catholic historian, politician, and writer. Lord Acton knew several major foreign languages. Acton’s linguistic and religious passion may have influenced Tolkien many years later. A fellow Catholic, Tolkien used the literary legacy that power tends to corrupt even the best men, as his main theme. In Lord of the Rings, the most powerful Ring cannot be used as a tool for good by even the best heroes, because they too would eventually be corrupted, no matter their intentions. The revelation seems to be that power is part of Original Sin as described in the the Bible, in the book of Genesis, in the Garden of Eden. The Old Testament myth that humans fell from the grace of godly paradise because we submitted to the evil temptation of power (the apple advocated by the serpent), seems to have found new expression in the words of these men. Acton collected a large historical library for the “History of Liberty”. Acton was politically Liberal, and travelled greatly. Acton loved reading original historic letters. Acton lived at his country house in Aldenham, Shropshire; and served in the House of Commons. Acton admired the U.S. Government for the Constitution, but oddly sided with the southern Confederacy for defending individual citizen liberties against the tyranny of Union Federal empire (while ignoring slavery). Acton was appointed to the Royal Victorian Order, as a Knight Commander (KCVO).

“History is the arbiter of controversy, the monarch of all she surveys.” “There is not a more perilous or immoral habit of mind than the sanctifying of success.” [about Oliver Cromwell] “The strong man with the dagger is followed by the weak man with the sponge.” “Liberty is not the power of doing what we like, but the right of being able to do what we ought.”

In 1887 Lord Acton wrote his most famous quote:

“…I cannot accept your canon that we are to judge Pope and King unlike other men, with a favorable presumption that they did no wrong. If there is any presumption it is the other way, against the holders of power, increasing as the power increases. Historic responsibility has to make up for the want of legal responsibility. Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority, still more when you super-add the tendency or the certainty of corruption by authority. There is no worse heresy than that the office sanctifies the holder of it. That is the point at which the negation of Catholicism and the negation of Liberalism meet and keep high festival, and the end learns to justify the means. You would hang a man of no position like Ravaillac; but if what one hears is true, then Elizabeth asked the jailer to murder Mary, and William III of England ordered his Scots minister to extirpate (destroy) a clan. Here are the greatest names coupled with the greatest crimes; you would spare those criminals, for some mysterious reason. I would hang them higher than Haman (biblical Persian minister in the Book of Esther), for reasons of quite obvious justice, still more, still higher for the sake of historical science.”

He is best known for that remark he wrote in a letter to an Anglican bishop; but according to an editor of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica: “Lord Acton has left too little completed original work to rank among the great historians; his very learning seems to have stood in his way; he knew too much and his literary conscience was too acute for him to write easily, and his copiousness of information overloads his literary style. But he was one of the most deeply learned men of his time, and he will certainly be remembered for his influence on others.”

**

Mohandas ‘Bapu’ Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948) was an Indian Hindu non-violent civil disobedience activist. Gandhi was leader of the Indian independence movement against British colonial rule. Gandhi’s self-sacrifice inspired freedom movements for civil rights across the World. Raised in a merchant caste family in India, he later trained in law in London. Gandhi first used non-violent civil disobedience in South Africa, for colonial civil rights. Returning to India in 1915, he organized farmers and workers to protest against high land tax and bigotry. Leading the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led national campaigns for social causes and self-rule (Swaraj).

Gandhi helped India challenge the British salt tax by marching in 1930. In 1942 Gandhi called for the British to leave India. He was imprisoned for many years, upon many occasions, in South Africa and India. Gandhi lived modestly in a community and wore a traditional hand-spun Indian dhoti and shawl. Gandhi was vegetarian and took long fasts for spiritual and political reasons. Muslim Nationalism (Pakistan) and Gandhi’s Hindu pluralism in India helped to force Britain out of India in 1947.

Displaced Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs migrated; and religious violence broke out in Punjab and Bengal. Gandhi visited the riots to help and fasted to stop religious violence. Hindu nationalist conservatives criticized and assassinated Gandhi. Gandhi’s birthday is commemorated in India as a national holiday, and worldwide as the International Day of Nonviolence. As with all martyr heroes that lives real lives, Gandhi had many human flaws of the sort that might be emphasized more when historical writers express loss of popular favor their cults.

**

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien’s work was certainly influenced by the events of the World Wars, despite his public refusal of metaphor speculation. ‘The Lord of the Rings‘ explores abuse of corrupt power, by considering that the temptation of use of power can eventually corrupt anyone. The One Ring of Power created by Sauron promises great power, but eventually corrupts all who use it. Even good people are corrupted by lust for the Ring because of its power to rival Sauron, and by using its vast powers even the lightest souls darken. The ones best able to carry the Ring are innocent souls with meager ambition, and the best they can do with the Ring is to destroy it.

Tolkien said these words about power: “The proper study of man is anything but man, and the most improper job of any man . . is bossing other men. Not one in a million is fit for it, and least of all those who seek the opportunity.” [Letters #52] Tolkien believed that leaders should be judged by their example, more than common people are judged [James 3:1]. Power and authority allow for the most terrible things. The misuse of power often ruins leaders and followers who allow the abuse to happen. Vigilant active citizens will demand wise balance.

***

Power within us and others is clearly our responsibility; not only to control our own will power to keep it within reason, but also to influence the power that we allow others to hold over us and others. If citizens cannot control their own leader’s passion for power from within a government using democracy, then it will be left up to other governments in other countries (see World Wars). The conclusion to the problem of power is perhaps best summarized by Spiderman in Marvel Comics – “With great power, comes great responsibility.”