Archive for the History Category

Pot Bib – Corn King Sparrow

Posted in Biographies, Nature Studies, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 25, 2019 by Drogo

Last winter a loud male house sparrow spent most of his waking time sitting in the potted plant where we put small bits of corn. Other sparrows would come, but he would usually chase them out, and get into fights with other males (one time wounding him). We call male sparrows ‘bibs’ because of their black beard-like feathers, and birds that sit in pots for long hours we call ‘pot birds’ (it happens occasionally). So we named him Pot Bib, because he seemed to prefer sitting in the pot to all else.

Pot Bib’s first goal in life seemed to be to claim the pot as his home during the day, and at night he would sometimes sleep in a nearby abandoned robin’s nest. I had witnessed the robin’s nest getting raided by a crow, who looked for nests under gutter-down-spout corners in between balconies like that one. Pot Bib added grass to the nest, and slept in it for many early spring nights; so he could wake up and be right in the pot again. Starlings also raided the nest just for materials, and still Pot Bib would often sleep there, but also at another roost somewhere else. After a few weeks, Pot Bib lost interest in the nest as no mate wanted to risk the location probably.

Pot Bib’s second goal in life was to have a mate, and he did have a girl-friend who he allowed to eat corn, hang around, and chase him out of the pot. When the weather got warmer, Pot Bib got another life-style away from the pot; but still returns and chirps in his insane way every day.

I made a nest in a small wooden basket with a handle for Pot Bib on Easter (Ostara). In the basket I put mud half way up, then stuck in tiny twigs, wove in grasses and pine needles, and cushioned with chick-weed and yarrow. I thought that either Pot Bib or the house finches that come would take it, but our familiar mourning doves claimed it instead; but that is the story of Lucky the Dove.

potbib basket nest

 

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Lucky the Dove – Biography

Posted in Biographies, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing, Nature Studies, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 24, 2019 by Drogo

Lucky the Fledgling Dove – journal notes of the biography of Lucky’s youth

Lucky 11

Close Call Adventures of Lucky

 

Lucky’s parents are ‘3 Dots’ and ‘Neuro’, friendly wild mourning doves. Lucky was the second of two eggs laid by in a nest I made in a small basket (see the story of Pot Bib),  and hung under the eve of the balcony, near the back wall. lucky hatched May 12th 2019 on Mother’s  Sunday. I checked on the babies every other day and petted them. When they were just eggs the parent flew away immediately when I  approached. after the eggs hatched the parent stayed on the nest and would let me pet the parent with some Wing slaps. I wanted to get the babies familiar with me so I moved the nest to the floor of the balcony For a few minutes before putting it back,  and only then would the parent Fly Away.

 

Lucky was 5 days old,  friday May 17th

sibling got taken by a crow. Lucky brought inside for the night, attempted feeding, partially successful, Lucky swallowed some of the last attempts.

Lucky remained safe in the nest now relocated hidden under the bench, parents resumed feeding.

Lucky 6

randomly a red-shouldered Hawk was chased by a Crow, both landed on adjacent roof looking in at balcony, i scared them off.

 

Lucky was 9 days old

balcony jump, fledging for food frenzy

missing all night, looked in tree but could not see.

 

Lucky was 10 days old

morning mowers Machines of death,  looked all around, upon feeding branch baby was found. i climbed the fledging tree four times during this period. I had checked on Lucky and was content it would be fine on the feeding branch. However when i returned a few hours later, it had been knocked out of tree (i assume by Crow), and went under car. I chased Lucky around the car, and caught it, and put it in nesting box to bring back inside.

  Bath time. Practiced wing flapping.

at night back inside  in cage, attempted feeding.  Dovey and me fell asleep on couch, Lucky was on my belly, in a bundle lap pillow with tissues.

Luck 10

Lucky was 11 days old

I took lucky outside in the morning and we waited for its parents to come to the tree.  I sat in a chair reading a book while babysitting, lucky sat on my arm. people looked at me strangely, but I am not afraid to explain when I am trying to help an animal.  when the mother came it walked around lucky at the base of the tree, but would not feed lucky. the parents flew up into the tree, and lucky followed.  amazingly lucky was able to fly 5 ft up to the nearest branch, and climb and hop and fly up to the feeding branch. Hawk came in trees while feeding at feeding branch in morning.  Crow landed between balconies, while being attacked by Mockingbird, and looked into the balconies to find food. I moved lucky back to balcony. I got lucky onto a stick, and then my arm. Lucky hung to my back while i jumped down from tree, safely.

In cage on balcony, Lucky and Daddy ‘3 Dots’ could not solve the puzzle for feeding through a partially Open Door.  lucky did make it out of the partially open door once for one of three feedings that day. Three dots spent one hour going to the sides of the cage and cooing while both were peeping. lucky gets into a Feeding Frenzy most X it is called to by parents,  except for the time lucky spent in the nest again rest in 4 hours. during this time it ignored it’s parents and stayed in the nest like it did when it was a younger baby. I let Lucky out of the cage when I knew the parent was nearby and thought it might feed it.  three dots watched for a long time while babysat and both called when lucky was in the center of the balcony. lucky was able to push open the door once but seems to forget how it got in perhaps because Dove minds are not as sharp as crows who can use tools and unlock door mechanisms.  the large black birds soaring in the sky or probably turkey vultures because they did not flap as often as crows do, but ominously watched from the stadium lights which are taller than all the trees. Bath time. Practiced wing flapping and hunting for seeds with Noel.

 

At sunset I wanted to be generous and allow the parent a final chance to come on the balcony and feed the baby,  but like last time the parent was more interested in calling the baby to come to them. so I told the baby to call to the parents and get them to come to it.  as usual I allowed lucky a way to get out of the cage for feeding and fly away if it could. as dark approached and the father cooed , Lucky woke up into another Feeding Frenzy,  which surprised me because it had been so sleepy on the Nest earlier, and even when we were playing with it. eventually lucky looked straight at me through the open cage door, and burst through.  lucky sat on the bench cushion for a few seconds, and I sat there looking back at lucky, knowing lucky might chase after the cooes and leave the balcony. lucky gave me one last look, and leapt off of the cushion and over the railing,  flying all the way to the top of the nearby tree. when I went out to look and climbed for a fourth time, I think I scared the parents and lucky off to another tree, because even with the flashlight I could not find lucky, so I gave up for the night.  lucky continues to amaze me by how well it can fly when it wants to, even without adult feathers. Lucky’s juvenile feathers work amazingly well and may allow lucky to follow its parents around.

Lucky is 12 days old today,  and hopefully getting more feedings to grow faster if it is able to be with the parents more often. this morning the sweet air was fresh, the green of the tree leaves bright, and the branches moved in the breeze. I have seen Lucky’s parents, but no sign of Lucky. I hope Lucky survives and learns enough to live a long happy life, even if i never see Lucky again.

Lucky is 13 days old on Saturday, May 25

I walked around the block 3x today and did not see Lucky. It was not until dusk, after a rain shower, when i was going out to the store, that I spotted Lucky on the bedroom gable peak. Its parents were on the ground, cooing to Lucky to get down because it was too vulnerable up there in clear view. However Lucky learned from me how to dry off in the sun, and has a mind of its own. I recognized Lucky because it does not have mature feathers on its neck yet, so in silhouette has a very thin neck. We confirmed with binoculars for about 20 minutes. Two crows passed directly over Lucky, but Lucky did not flinch and they were not interested. I am so proud of Lucky, i think it will be ok. Then Lucky flew into the fledging tree, near the top, presumably for the night. As darkness fell, i spotted the mother in the center of the tree.

It seems Lucky may have spent yesterday high up in the fledging tree, where i could not see or get to it easily. It is also possible Lucky went to a few other trees and bushes, and I may have seen Lucky in a bush, but it could have been a robin fledgling since i saw 2 or 3 of them. I also saw a catbird and robin on a nest in bushes. The mulberry tree in back has many ground level berries, they are good. I am satisfied knowing that Lucky is doing well, and is not lost.

*

Pieter Bruegel The Elder

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Biographies, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on May 23, 2019 by Drogo

pieter bruegel

Pieter Bruegel the Elder was a Flemish Renaissance artist was born around 1525 and died in 1569. His exact birth place in Brabant (either in present-day Belgium or Holland) remains uncertain. Bruegel’s paintings and drawings mainly reflect the everyday life of peasants in the Netherlands, with a netherworld twist. Bruegel based his work upon realistic observations and intricate design with allegories. In 1556 Bruegel was encouraged by his lifelong friend and publisher Hieronymus Cock to put aside his interest in landscape, and imitate and renovate an earlier local Brabantine style by Hieronymus Bosch. Hieronymus Bosch was the original innovator of his unique style of symbolic painting in the Netherlands 40 years before Bruegel. Bosch’s art still had a very medieval feel to it, using abnormal situations and small demonic Little Creatures. Although bosch and Bruegel styles are very similar, both have demons which express ‘verve anime’; Bruegel was able to do more realistic pieces with greater rotundity of form. Bruegel vividly picked social and emotional attitudes of the day into farces.

The name ‘Peeter Brueghels’ first appears on the members list of the artists Guild in Antwerp in 1551. After many former works it was in 1556 that Bruegel did his first Bosch-like drawing titled ‘Big fish eat little ones’. Sitting on a large knife with in the picture is a Christian orb of the Holy Roman Emperor possibly representing the Inquisition and the uncertainty of the times. In 1557 Bruegel engraved and printed ‘The seven deadly sins’, his style still greatly reflecting bosch. In 1560 Bruegel completed the Seven Virtues, establishing territory for his own style in the art world. The Seven Virtues contains a philosophical complex idea based on the moralistic treaties of Desiredius Erasmus, the Enchiridion (Shield of the Christian Warrior). Erasmus’ book is concerned with man’s inability to distinguish between appearance and reality. Erasmus suggests that we tend to confuse virtue with material show, when in reality true virtue is to be found only in spiritual devotion to Christian principles.

In 1564 Bruegel a wonderful drawing called ‘Fall of the Magician’. That same year he had his first son Pieter Bruegel The Younger. His son would also carry on the painting tradition. ‘The fall of the magician’ has an overall appearance of demonic tumult. St James the Minor’s presence, as he observed Hermogenes’ downfall. However a large robed figure in the back of the picture is merely playing a shell game. In the reality of the painting, is the observer being misled as to the actual situation? Perhaps the forces of evil were given another identity then is at first apparent.  This theme is reminiscent of the medieval Hermes Trismegistus legends, and that later germanic Faustian tales of deals with the devil and the corrupting lust for power. Bruegel’s message seems to be that the world is cruel, but made worse perhaps because man has made it so. Would Bruegel have agreed with Kant, that if all men of Goodwill were to act together the world would be a better place? Or is that concept too unrealistic?

Bruegel did a very realistic painting of the Infant Jesus being presented by his mother Mary, to the three kings. A realistic drawing of peasants dancing is called ‘the marriage dance’, and like similar paintings of his, this epitomizes Bruegel’s style mixture of mundane and surreal. After viewing, mental reality sinks in later, that his art cleverly pokes fun at the Christian Catholic Church, and existence itself. Bruegel ordered his wife to burn certain drawings because he thought they were “too biting and sharp”. Bruegel’s reality was hidden within the action, setting, and characters of his art works; because he was reluctant to openly admit his surreptitious views on the evils of society.

Bruegel earned his living producing drawings to be turned into prints for the leading print publisher (Hieronymus Cock). His great successes were his series of allegories. In Bruegel’s works his sinners are grotesque, while the allegories of virtue wear odd head-gear. Imitations of Bosch sold well, like ‘Big Fish Eat Little Fish’, which Bruegel signed but Cock falsely attributed to Bosch in the print version.

Audio Recording of my Reading this Report is on Audiomack.

[This report was for a philosophy project when I was a senior in high school in 1994.]

Science As Process

Posted in Commercial Corporations, Cooperative collaboration, Critical Commentary of Civilization, History, Science & Math, Sustainability, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 8, 2019 by Drogo

Scientific Sustainable Issues

 

I trust people who are dedicated to provable facts, and able to negotiate about debates on what constitutes “evidence”. Environmental data is debated by those scientists highly educated while it is gathered and for years afterwards in universities that are socially liberal but academically conservative; which is a reflection of conventional society and group societies and trade organizations. There will always be the fringes that ask questions, and push limits. i side with scientific consensus, regardless of corporate propaganda (probably just because i have never been bribed enough), but i always remember that minority questions can change the course of scientific progress on issues. Human philosophical rationality can be used to determine all scientific or factual conclusions, for example to determine what defines pollution and how much pollution is allowable in a given area; and those conclusions will change to adapt to the data.

Medicines Are Drugs

Posted in Ethics & Morals, Medical, news, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 8, 2019 by Drogo

Drug possession and health care are so related, drug possession it basically means medicine possession, albeit overdose abuse.often they are exactly the same. heroine is fundamentally linked to morphine in composition and use. pot is much more of a medicine than alcohol, but both are used as medicine by poor people. natives do not see a distinction, for spiritual reasons. ‘drug’ means illegal medicine usually, the health issue is usually about pain treatment and dependence on the substance, whether addicted or prescribed for persistent problems. regarding pill addiction, they really are usually prescribed medicines. medicines always have side effects and toxicity levels that can add up when used frequently.

In AA and medical practices people use one ‘drug’ substance to use as a crutch or addiction, to switch with the one they want to get off of. In the case of heroin and methadone they are almost the same strength from what users and social workers told me. In my college roommates’ case it was coffee in trade of cocaine. 3 homeless people i know were not homeless because they were drug addicts, because they had more serious problems in their lives like family relations and disorders; so i think the law enforcement part of the war on drugs is often not appropriate, and some law enforcement people are speaking out about martial law abuse now. studying the results of the social programs would be interesting for sure, and how much force or legal threat is used to get them to do what is wanted by property owners.some medicines are safer than others for sure, as chemicals with toxic levels can vary.

Power Corrupts People

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization, Education / Schools, Ethics & Morals, History, Recommendations & Tributes, Spiritual, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 15, 2018 by Drogo

Baron J.E.E. Dalberg-Acton (aka Lord Acton 1834-1902) was a noble English Catholic historian, politician, and writer. Lord Acton knew several major foreign languages. Acton’s linguistic and religious passion may have influenced Tolkien many years later. A fellow Catholic, Tolkien used the literary legacy that power tends to corrupt even the best men, as his main theme. In Lord of the Rings, the most powerful Ring cannot be used as a tool for good by even the best heroes, because they too would eventually be corrupted, no matter their intentions. The revelation seems to be that power is part of Original Sin as described in the the Bible, in the book of Genesis, in the Garden of Eden. The Old Testament myth that humans fell from the grace of godly paradise because we submitted to the evil temptation of power (the apple advocated by the serpent), seems to have found new expression in the words of these men. Acton collected a large historical library for the “History of Liberty”. Acton was politically Liberal, and travelled greatly. Acton loved reading original historic letters. Acton lived at his country house in Aldenham, Shropshire; and served in the House of Commons. Acton admired the U.S. Government for the Constitution, but oddly sided with the southern Confederacy for defending individual citizen liberties against the tyranny of Union Federal empire (while ignoring slavery). Acton was appointed to the Royal Victorian Order, as a Knight Commander (KCVO).

“History is the arbiter of controversy, the monarch of all she surveys.” “There is not a more perilous or immoral habit of mind than the sanctifying of success.” [about Oliver Cromwell] “The strong man with the dagger is followed by the weak man with the sponge.” “Liberty is not the power of doing what we like, but the right of being able to do what we ought.”

In 1887 Lord Acton wrote his most famous quote:

“…I cannot accept your canon that we are to judge Pope and King unlike other men, with a favorable presumption that they did no wrong. If there is any presumption it is the other way, against the holders of power, increasing as the power increases. Historic responsibility has to make up for the want of legal responsibility. Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority, still more when you super-add the tendency or the certainty of corruption by authority. There is no worse heresy than that the office sanctifies the holder of it. That is the point at which the negation of Catholicism and the negation of Liberalism meet and keep high festival, and the end learns to justify the means. You would hang a man of no position like Ravaillac; but if what one hears is true, then Elizabeth asked the jailer to murder Mary, and William III of England ordered his Scots minister to extirpate (destroy) a clan. Here are the greatest names coupled with the greatest crimes; you would spare those criminals, for some mysterious reason. I would hang them higher than Haman (biblical Persian minister in the Book of Esther), for reasons of quite obvious justice, still more, still higher for the sake of historical science.”

He is best known for that remark he wrote in a letter to an Anglican bishop; but according to an editor of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica: “Lord Acton has left too little completed original work to rank among the great historians; his very learning seems to have stood in his way; he knew too much and his literary conscience was too acute for him to write easily, and his copiousness of information overloads his literary style. But he was one of the most deeply learned men of his time, and he will certainly be remembered for his influence on others.”

**

Mohandas ‘Bapu’ Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948) was an Indian Hindu non-violent civil disobedience activist. Gandhi was leader of the Indian independence movement against British colonial rule. Gandhi’s self-sacrifice inspired freedom movements for civil rights across the World. Raised in a merchant caste family in India, he later trained in law in London. Gandhi first used non-violent civil disobedience in South Africa, for colonial civil rights. Returning to India in 1915, he organized farmers and workers to protest against high land tax and bigotry. Leading the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led national campaigns for social causes and self-rule (Swaraj).

Gandhi helped India challenge the British salt tax by marching in 1930. In 1942 Gandhi called for the British to leave India. He was imprisoned for many years, upon many occasions, in South Africa and India. Gandhi lived modestly in a community and wore a traditional hand-spun Indian dhoti and shawl. Gandhi was vegetarian and took long fasts for spiritual and political reasons. Muslim Nationalism (Pakistan) and Gandhi’s Hindu pluralism in India helped to force Britain out of India in 1947.

Displaced Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs migrated; and religious violence broke out in Punjab and Bengal. Gandhi visited the riots to help and fasted to stop religious violence. Hindu nationalist conservatives criticized and assassinated Gandhi. Gandhi’s birthday is commemorated in India as a national holiday, and worldwide as the International Day of Nonviolence. As with all martyr heroes that lives real lives, Gandhi had many human flaws of the sort that might be emphasized more when historical writers express loss of popular favor their cults.

**

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien’s work was certainly influenced by the events of the World Wars, despite his public refusal of metaphor speculation. ‘The Lord of the Rings‘ explores abuse of corrupt power, by considering that the temptation of use of power can eventually corrupt anyone. The One Ring of Power created by Sauron promises great power, but eventually corrupts all who use it. Even good people are corrupted by lust for the Ring because of its power to rival Sauron, and by using its vast powers even the lightest souls darken. The ones best able to carry the Ring are innocent souls with meager ambition, and the best they can do with the Ring is to destroy it.

Tolkien said these words about power: “The proper study of man is anything but man, and the most improper job of any man . . is bossing other men. Not one in a million is fit for it, and least of all those who seek the opportunity.” [Letters #52] Tolkien believed that leaders should be judged by their example, more than common people are judged [James 3:1]. Power and authority allow for the most terrible things. The misuse of power often ruins leaders and followers who allow the abuse to happen. Vigilant active citizens will demand wise balance.

***

Power within us and others is clearly our responsibility; not only to control our own will power to keep it within reason, but also to influence the power that we allow others to hold over us and others. If citizens cannot control their own leader’s passion for power from within a government using democracy, then it will be left up to other governments in other countries (see World Wars). The conclusion to the problem of power is perhaps best summarized by Spiderman in Marvel Comics – “With great power, comes great responsibility.”

Arts & Literature Seasonal Gathering

Posted in Education / Schools, Events / Celebrations, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing, jobs, news, Services, Sales or Trade, Society Clubs or Social Groups, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 9, 2018 by Drogo

Day, Month, Year, Time – Arts & Literature Seasonal Gathering – You are invited to the Victorian Townhouse of the Honorable S.P. (near Market Street) __ Third Street, downtown Frederick, MD; to read anything of your choice for apx.10 minutes, and our informal group will discuss for about the same time as the reading. Tea will be served.

Democratic voting on name of group, which selections to read, whether to record, and date of next meeting.

[for actual current details contact SCOD members]