Archive for the History Category

Religious Symbols vs Political Racism

Posted in Atheist/Agnostic, Legal / Laws, news, Pagan, Religions, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 23, 2018 by Drogo

Geometry is not Racist

Religious symbols of Christianity and Paganism are used by racist groups like the KKK and Nazis, but their politics are so full of hate the only religion that racist groups could really claim would be an evil type like Satanism (whose practitioners are usually better behaved than racists), since most Christians and Pagans have no racial doctrines or racist dogmas. Many of us work hard to cleanse our religious practices of those among us who seek to harm others unjustly based on aggressive hostile ignorance. Religions and cultural practices thrive that are based on good-will towards others, hospitality, and celebrating life and sharing.

Simple abstract religious symbols are void of racial prejudice by their nature and historic use. Crosses, runes, spirals, or any other universal symbols are barely the property of any faith, and certainly will not be only used for evil purposes. Even the swastika should not be shunned by most people anymore, as the Nazis should have never been allowed to get the political power they did, which is really what allowed them to restrict other people from wanting to use what was previously a cross-cultural ancient symbol.

Yes racists have the right to protest too (1st Amendment to the US Constitution), but the crimes their leaders were put to death for after WW2 are still crimes no matter who does them in the future. No militarized police force of brown shirts or even SS black shirts will save racist hate from humanitarian justice. Tolerance of extreme intolerance only goes so far, for so long. The more that we are loving to each-other, the less people will want to show hate, even towards those who still want to use hate to harm others.

Blessed be, in the name of the Goddess.

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Commentary on Saint Patrick

Posted in History, Pagan, Politics, Religions, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on April 19, 2018 by Drogo

Reasoning behind understanding Patrick as a Roman-Briton Invader at War against Pagan Ireland

If many of us as modern commercialized Americans consider ‘The Confessions’ of St. Patrick as objectively as possible, we might compare his compelling dogmatic rhetoric to a persuasive sales pitch from a sincerely corporate sales-person, and we could forgive Patrick any lies or half-truths or religious metaphors presented as true, but are literally false (like miracles). Militant Atheists will not be so kind as many of us might. Many of us want to respect the feelings of members of our family that are conservative Christians regarding the ‘Santa Claus’ fundamentals of what is conventionally considered ‘religious faith’ or belief in super-natural mythological metaphors (aka historical fantasy fiction). While some of us might have no such restraints in criticizing a deeply flawed historically political institution descended from the Roman Empire.

One odd thing that bothers me about the text that we are expected to believe belongs to an actual historic person named St. Patrick, is that it tells us in the beginning that he is biased against the Irish because he was a foreign Roman-Briton who was taken captive by violent natives. Therefore we understand why Patrick would feel inspired by Arthurian political powers in his contemporary homeland, which were extremely bigoted against all Pagans; including Irish Gaels, and Gaelic Scots, and Scottish Picts. Much like St. Paul, St. Patrick seems to be spewing religious propaganda as a cultural war against Pagans.

Patrick (Padraig) son of Calpurnius was born around 400 AD in Roman Britain, to a family with a (male of course) line of Christian priests. At the age of 16 he was captured by a group of Irish pirates. The raiders brought Patrick to Ireland where he was enslaved and held captive for 6 years. Could a teen named Patrick have written a text like that against his kidnappers? It sure sounds convincing that someone in his position would have a ‘come to Jesus’ moment, and be dead set on getting revenge on all those he holds responsible for his abduction and enslavement. It could also be similar to the way that ‘deep states’ use propaganda to start wars (Gulf of Tonkin, Kuwaiti Babies Killed, Weapons of Mass Destruction).

Saint Patrick was more Arthurian than Irish.

Regarding Warlords or Dictators

Posted in History, Military, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on March 25, 2018 by Drogo

Warlords, Dictators, or Generals of fame are important to History. Yet what does this say about the value of Peace, human life, or Life in general?

Greek, Roman, and Christian Empires used sculpture and architecture to facilitate the public, usually under dictatorships. In Greece stoas, plazas, and theaters promoted democracy; yet cooperative societies get quickly smashed or oppressed by competitive economic and political greed. Many militants consider this a brutal part of human nature, that we will not ‘grow out of’ in our evolution as a species for many eons.

Caesar was a tyrannical dictator who established a line of Emperors, so although very brilliant and important to History, he is not really a SCOD role-model. Yet Queen Boadicea is a SCOD heroine, because of her suffering under oppression and rebelling in defense of her people, not a conquering invader.

Colonial Empires rely on extracting resources from branches of subjugated colonies under threat of military force. Empires can run using monarchies, states, or corporations as legal power. American government began as a corporate conglomerate who represented their home states illegally under a monarchy empire. Gradually US Federal government grew with economic and population expansion, run by corporate business owners who corrupted politicians. Thus began our American Empire.

It is hard to consider what militant leaders do, as ethically good; even if they kill some bad people, or defend their own country, when in the course of their harsh rule they command the killing of thousands. Generals may learn the hard way that war is hell, and have wisdom of campaign strategy and knowledge of will power leadership strategies, but it should always be remembered that they were not the most peaceful people in over-all major ways compared to most great philosophers who are rarely recorded to have killed anyone (unless we include orators and authors like Hitler). Most great philosophers advocate peace more than violence, and this is why the most important SCOD philosophers should consider the morality of their major views regarding conflict resolution and what they are promoting within society. Questions of killing become part of the SCOD theme regarding the important value of Life, and how that value affects civilization.

We should judge our own leaders the harshest, because we have more responsibility and control over ourselves than others.

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Immanuel Kant

Posted in History, Philosophy, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on December 13, 2017 by Drogo

Immanuel Kant was one of the greatest rational philosophers of the Enlightenment, and set a categorical standard for modern reasoning. All of Kant’s years from birth to death (1724-1804), were spent in the small provincial town Konigsberg, in East Prussia. Kant’s grand-father was of Scotch lineage, but if he had kept the original spelling (Cant), the C would have been pronounced as a Z by the citizens of Konigsberg. Also Kant’s original first name was Emanuel, but he changed it to Immanuel after learning Hebrew. Both of Kant’s parents were modest financially and religiously; but spiritually nurtured by a Christian Lutheran sect called the Pietists. Being a Pietist Christian, Kant had a mixed sense of pride in religious rigor, and humility about humble limitations.

Kant was first educated at the local College; then in 1740 Kant went to the University of Konigsburg, where he studied the classics, physics, and philosophy. The master of German Philosophy at the time was Christian von Wolff; who was a dominant secretary of the Enlightenment movement, and stated that “man could be happy and good without the divine grace of revelation”. This atheist statement angered the ‘Soldier King’ of Prussia, King Frederick William I; however his condemnation only enhanced Wolff’s international fame. Immanuel Kant revered Wolff as the “most powerful representative of dogmatic rationalism, from the stand-point of pure unshaken confidence in the strength of Reason.” Kant eventually replaced Wolff as the popular national philosopher.

In Kant’s home town of Konigsburg, the city burghers were said to set their watches when Kant passed by their windows on his precisely-timed daily walks. He did not write his most famous works until he was older. When people that knew him read his work, they often agreed that it was logical and well-ordered, just like Kant himself. Kant applied his logic to a mature reflection on whether or not to marry; he decided finally to remain single. Kant’s travels did not exceed the city boundaries, his life had no remarkable adventures or political power or social connections, yet he was an immensely successful tutor, lecturer, and a charming host.

Immanuel Kant was a man of clear, critical, logical, vigorous, rigorous, and trenchant thought. In his Critique of Pure Reason he methodically divides chapters to explore ‘a priori’ metaphysical issues. ‘A priori’ is the pure form of sensuous general intuitions, that existed prior to our physical existence; archetypal knowledge from before we were born. Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason was followed by the Critique of Practical Reason (1788) and the Critique of Judgment (1790).

“Act always in such a way. that you should want your action to become a universal law.” – Immanuel Kant. This categorical imperative is one of the main recommendations of Kant’s writings. Although it centers around action, Kant also said that virtue was in the ‘Will’, and not the ‘Act’. Consciousness involves feeling, thinking, and acting. Feeling regards faith, thinking seeks epistemology, and acting involves ethics.

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Dante’s Christianity

Posted in History, Poems, Religions, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 2, 2017 by Drogo

Christian Hell, Purgatory, & Heaven

Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) was a major Italian poet for writing a very famous religious fantasy book called ‘The Divine Comedy’. Dante is called the ‘Founder of Italian’ because he wrote in Tuscan vernacular ‘vulgar’ dialect, rather than traditional or ‘proper’ Latin. Dante used a poetic literature style for his novel, which used the 3-line rhyme scheme (terza rima). Dante’s depictions of Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven have inspired a large body of religious art, and influenced Christianity itself. His ‘Divine Comedy‘ represents the medieval mind combining religious and romantic imagery. Dante’s quest for his ideal love ‘Beatrice’ represents the soul’s journey towards God. Dante draws the reader into his transcendent fictional memoir by sharing common life phases, famous and infamous names, and biographical details. Dante called it a ‘comedy’ because the plot proceeds from turmoil to a happy ending; but the story is certainly a mixture of many genres. Fans that refer to it as ‘The Inferno‘ are usually most fascinated by the horrible torture scenes in Hell. Fear of Hell is very compelling for many Christians, fed by the classic ‘fire & brimstone’ sermons. Purgatory is similar to the torture myths of Sisyphus and Prometheus, with a spiral upwards. The Garden of Eden crowns its summit. The 7 deadly sins are cleansed in Purgatory, so loving sinners can earn going to Heaven. Heaven is made of celestial rings crowned by the golden Empyrean pyramid containing the essence of God. There are 9 ring levels each with 1 final chief control center, for a total of 10 layers per realm.

Dante’s book is similar to classical adventures in Hades, where the hero visits the realm of the dead and returns to the land of the living to tell the tale; except for Catholics there are 3 realms of the dead where heavenly ‘Paradise’ seems not within the Underworld, and with Purgatory takes the place of Mount Olympus. There are references to the Roma-Amor mirror dichotomy palindrome of public duty and private love, Sunwise vs Anti-diasil spiral procession, and Plebeian Secession.

Medieval Italy had a political struggle between Guelphs and Ghibellines. Dante was part of the Guelphs, who favored the Papacy over the Holy Roman Emperor. Florence’s Guelphs split into factions around 1300: the White Guelphs and the Black Guelphs. Dante was among the White Guelphs who were exiled in 1302 by the Lord-Mayor.

The last word in each of the three canticas is stelle (“stars”).20171201_151134

SCOD Detective Method

Posted in History, Philosophy, Politics, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on December 1, 2017 by Drogo

For problem solving using case studies, history, and philosophy

1. Study – investigate a problem with evidence

2. Compare – question and test assumptions

3. Predict – logical deductive reasoning

4. Prescribe – historic and scientific based solution

5. Practice – solve and observe to know results

6. Repeat – as need arises by dialog, communication

Romanesque and Gothic Architecture

Posted in Historic Architecture, Religions, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on November 15, 2017 by Drogo

Cathedral Architecture of the Middle Ages

Romanesque cathedrals were based on Roman basilica designs, with thick walls and high ceilings. Engineering innovations like Gothic arches, flying buttresses, and keystone vaulting allowed for higher and larger expanses. Stain-glass windows and sculptures were integral parts of Gothic style; Cathedrals had exterior demons and interior angels. Water spout sculptures were called gargoyles and grotesques were ornaments to ‘ward off evil’ in much the same way comedic caricatures and scary decoration do at traditional festivals like Halloween. By embracing cultural demons in some form, the stress of Sin has less power for some; while scaring others into obedience, lest they get captured by demons outside. The inner sanctum of the church was where God protects his followers.