Archive for american

American Dream Fallout

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization, Economics, POB Audio, Politics, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 11, 2016 by Drogo

In the Wake of the Great Recession the American Dream Dies

“The American Dream is a crucial thread in this country’s tapestry, woven through politics, music and culture. Though the phrase has different meanings to different people, it suggests an underlying belief that hard work pays off and that the next generation will have a better life than the previous generation. But three years after the worst recession in almost a century, the American Dream now feels in jeopardy to many…” “Economic statistics validate those feelings. According to the Census Bureau, an average man working full time made 10 percent less money last year than he did a decade ago.” [Read full story at NPR – American Dream Faces Harsh New Reality]

“New economic research shows Americans are no longer as likely to make more than their parents did at the same age…The American dream is harder to attain than it used to be. People may have felt that for a long time. Now there’s a body of research to back that up. One definition of the American dream is that your children will make more money than you did. Now economists have charted the percentage of people who make more than their parents did at the same age, and the picture is striking…” (adjusted for inflation) If you were born in 1940, you had a 92% chance that you would make more money than your parents did, because of national economic growth. For those born in 1980 it has fallen to 50%. Besides changes in educational and industrial labor, the main economic reason most people are not out-earning their parents is that corporate productivity gains go disproportionately to the few people at the top. Income inequality between the poor and the rich is the main problem. [Read full story at NPR – Economists Chart ‘Index Of The American Dream‘]

“Income Inequality Impairs The American Dream of Upward Mobility.” [Read and Listen to the full story at NPR – Debate: Does Income Inequality Impair The American Dream?]

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Like a phoenix we can rise from the ashes and co-create a new American Dream!

 

Benjamin Franklin

Posted in Psychology with tags , , , , , , , , on August 27, 2015 by Drogo

Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) was a polymath, author, printer, philosopher, freemason, postmaster, scientist, inventor, civic activist, politician, and diplomat. As an American scientist of the Enlightenment he studied physics for his discoveries, theories, and inventions. He invented lightning rods, bifocals, the Franklin stove, and many other instruments dealing with electricity, work, and music. He helped organize local civic functions, like Philadelphia’s fire department, schools, and journalist printing presses. Ben became wealthy publishing Poor Richard’s Almanack, and The Pennsylvania Gazette. Almanacks were popular in colonial America; mixing seasonal weather forecasts, practical advice, puzzles, and other amusements.

Poor Richard’s Almanack used word-play (puns) of the 1700s to explore common proverbs and ‘coin’ witty phrases. Wisdom often meant providing an apt adage for any occasion. ‘Richard’ was one of Franklin’s pen names.

“A penny saved is two-pence dear.”

– Poor Richard (Ben Franklin)

It was not until the 1800s, that we see the phrase worded as we commonly hear now, often attributed to Franklin.

“A penny saved is a penny earned.” Pall Mall Magazine, Sept. 1899

Here are other proverbs listed by Ben Franklin:

“Fish and visitors stink in three days.”

“A countryman between two lawyers,

is like a fish between two cats.”

“A cypher and humility make

figures and virtues of ten-fold value.”

“A false friend and a shadow attend

only while the sun shines.” (on rainy-day friends)

“A fine genius in his own country, is

like gold in the mine.”

“After three days men grow weary of

a wench, a guest, and weather rainy.”

“A life of leisure, and a life of laziness,

are two things.”

“An egg today is better than a hen to-morrow.”

(debatable, like ‘chicken or egg‘)

“Anger is never without a reason, but

seldom with a good one.”

“Anger warms the invention, but over-

heats the oven.”

“An honest man will receive neither

money nor praise, that is not his due.”

“A pair of good ears will drain dry an

hundred tongues.”

“A plowman on his legs is higher than

a gentleman on his knees.”

“Approve not of him that commends all you say.”

That last proverb is meant to disapprove of false flattery, but does not allow that some people may actually love you so much you can do no wrong. Here are more from Ben Franklin:

“A quarrelsome man has no good neighbors.”

“There are no gains without pains.”
“Early to bed and early to rise,

makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.”
“Plow deep while sluggards sleep,

and you shall have corn to sell and to keep.”

“A quiet conscience sleeps in thunder.”

“Are you angry that others disappoint you?

Remember you cannot depend upon yourself.”

“Be always ashamed to catch thyself idle.”

(a Puritan curse akin to ‘Devil’s play’ warnings)

“A watched pot never boils.” – current adaptation

Time feels longer when you’re waiting for something to happen, and you keep checking on it all the time, getting more and more anxious. Actually we all know that watching the pot does not stop it from boiling (without even getting into the Quantum Enigma); but our perception of time often slows when we worry about the future, and speeds up when we are are contently enjoying the present. The original phrase is more accurate, but still psychological.

“A watched pot is slow to boil.”

Franklin wrote this in another publication, but referred to it as something Poor Richard might have said, as the proverb isn’t found in any of the Poor Richard almanacs.

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New Age Hope – Sacred Sites

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Hikes with tags , , , , , , , , on July 17, 2015 by Drogo

As I chew on some home-grown Native American tobacco I was given by my new friends, I reflect on the adventure I just had to a local ancient sacred site. I met with Cherokee and Lumbee Indians who showed me an un-excavated paleolithic stone site. To respect their privacy, I will not go into details of their names or how to get there; but it was a most exciting time! We spoke about how the Age of Aquarius is indeed transitioning out of the Age of Pisces (yes the ages go backwards), and things are changing. We talked about how languages do not have to be barriers, but are important tools for ‘coming to terms’ for sharing between cultures. We found out that we agree ‘agri-culture’ is for everyone (see article in Observer May 2015), and we want to preserve nature and farm land. We recognized the problems of ethnic-biased education, and the perpetual war machine of the MIC. Then they showed me the ancient stones in the gully below their beautiful house. The stones had significant orientation to each-other, according to solar orientation. There were clearly piles, circles, a spiral, and a serpentine line of stones. The rocks were of various composition, not the typical limestone of the area. It seems very possible that in the past (I will leave the dating to the archeologists) people used the stones for rituals involving the springs and the creek. Perhaps in this ‘New Age’ people of various cultural back-grounds will continue to come together for similar reasons. My indian friends have started a regional ‘Gathering’ for agri-culture, so yes the pattern shift has begun, and we are actively making it happen.

Greening of America, the 1969 Book by Charles Reich

Posted in Book Reports with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 7, 2015 by Drogo

Greening of America

Charles Reich said the Green Revolution had already begun spreading rapidly through society by 1970, bending it towards a more humane community of reasoning individuals in touch with themselves, each-other, and Nature. “It will originate with the individual and culture, and it will change politics only as its final act… This is the revolution of the new generation.” – Greening of America, by Charles Reich

Charles Reich explains the American Crisis as:

1. hypocrisy of unjust war on the poor; 2. political, corporate, and legal corruption; 3. industrial destruction of natural environments; 4. helplessness of common people due to weakened democracy and liberties; 5. meaningless pollution of work and commercial society; 6. apathetic and hostile anti-community; 7. individuals enslaved to the system. We feel we have no control and are powerless to make constructive changes.

Midevil Films Review

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Fictional Stories, Film Reviews, Interviews, POB Video, Recommendations & Tributes, Roleplaying / Reenacting with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 19, 2013 by Drogo

Midevil Films Productions

Mid-Western American Independent Film group

Based on Interview with Founder, Producer, Director, Writer, and Actress:  Angela Daum 

Aliases include: Arlyssen Arlussen / Olivia Alyss / Kallie Stevenson

List of some Films:

The Map, The Lesson and The Test, Angela as a Ranger, Angela as a Courier, The Three Gems, I murdered a Fairy?, Ranger Mottos, MCIS, Midevil Crime Investigation Service, The Day in the Life of a Courier, How to wash your K9, Andrew Audition

Angela has fun with all her films, and the actors are good and play along well with the script for a finished result. She is a maverick woman who is both a passionate writer and a bold actress. She is a loyal to her crafts and her friends.

Watch their films on Youtube Channel Ranger Alyss. Angela’s favorite scene from Angela as a Ranger is: “What I have I gotten myself into.” Angela: “The weeds you just walked into them.”

For Angela film making is a passion she want to continue for as long as possible; with more shows and films on the way!!

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End of Interview with Angela of Midevil Films.

– squirrel happens! –

Analysis of Apostles of Success

Posted in Book Reports, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Economics, History with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 15, 2013 by Drogo

Apostles of the Self-Made Man: Changing Concepts of Success in America

1965 book by John G. Cawelti – University of Chicago Phoenix Press – 280 pages

 Success

SUMMARY

This is a book about the popular culture of success in America. It discusses natural qualities of character, education, values, and needs of individuals and society. It is a decent American history of changing concepts of success; with a focus on three main sources: historic individuals, fictional figures, and manual guides. It uses literature as a source to reference social history.

In spite of their persistent devotion to the idea of success, Americans have differed greatly in the way they defined it. That is the subject of this book. – p.3

Though the self-made man wasn’t an American invention, Americans have cherished the notion of someone rising out of poverty and, through hard work and dedication, achieving at least a moderate amount of wealth and respect. Purely American icons such as Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson each wrote about the opportunity for anyone in a fluid American class system to grow through their own power towards a particular position in society. Yet, much like Abraham Lincoln in the tumultuous ante-bellum period and the Gilded Age’s robber barons, the self-made man appeared most notably in times of rapid change and transition . – C.1

Three Strands of American Success

  1. Religious – Protestant Work Ethic and pious morality

  2. Economic – wealth = success

  3. Complex Individual and Social Ethics and Dreams, often combining the first 2 stands

American society saw three main versions of the self-made man emerge in epitomizing the ideal of success. The first focused on a Protestant notion of “piety, frugality, and diligence” in fulfilling the duties of one’s occupation. This version suggested that a static, stable social order existed in which success was the attainment of respectability in this world and led to the assurance of salvation in the world to come. As strict Protestantism gave way to other, secular notions of success, this ideal began to fade away.

The second tradition placed a premium on a more economic emphasis of success. While the first focused on religious notions of grace and propriety, the second enlisted the purely lay qualities of aggressiveness, competitiveness, and forcefulness. As industrialization swept over the United States in the Gilded Age and beyond, people prescribed to this ideal of success beyond the scope of religion. The hierarchical structure of many new corporations demanded such qualities from their employees if they hoped to “climb the ladder of success.” The third type of success, was a combination of the former two; taking ethics and humility from religious loyalty, in an existential industrial work environment.

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For more of the report, click on the link here for SCOD Gallery Report with Chapter Links!

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Harpers Ferry Magic, Elemental Intro

Posted in Pagan with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 27, 2011 by Drogo

I.     Elements: of Nature, Existence, & Us

Elements specific to Harpers Ferry (listed in book)

 

Air        Gemini Mercury, Virgo Hephaestus, Libra Amore’ Harmony

East      Paralda, Aiet, Yellow Amarillo, Winds, Zephyr, Seraphim

East Rises the Sun between the 2 mountains, dawn drifting to DC

East Coast United States, Wake Up Flying, Good MorningWelcome!

 

Fire                Aries Mars, Leo Sol, Sagittarius Jupiter Yang Heart

South           Deas Energy Catalyst, Red Life Flame, Djinni, Tan Delta

Metal forged by fire was used in the First Federal Armory for Firepower!

Fighting brings Flux, John Brown’s Raid, and Civil War blood stained.

 

Water    Pisces Fish, Aquarius Well-Spring, Cancer Yin Moon

West      Aqua Iar, Blue Niksa, Liquid Waves, Poseidon Triton

Setting Sun over Charles Town Races, Pouring Gateway to WV!

River waters of the Potomac and Shenandoah float downstream to DC.

 

Earth         Taurus Mithra, Capricorn Saturn, Scorpio Pluto

North    Tuath Terra, Green Brown, Virdant Herne, Anubis Geo Ghob

Geology; Shale Limestone, Red Clay Soil, Black Silt Dirt, Sand & Mud!

Woods full of deciduous and evergreen trees, shrubs, and plants grow.

 

Spirit Synthesis of Place, Metal, and More

Geographic Geometric Triangles

 

Diagrams of the tri-state area, plan in relation to perspective view.

Energies converge here throughout time, conflicting and combining;

Flowing together and merging as the Potomac and Shenandoah…  

* excerpt from the 2006 book “Harpers Ferry Magic” by Drogo Empedocles. Please document your reference if you share this post.