Archive for arts

Creative Process: Vanity vs Self-Esteem

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Multimedia Communication, Philosophy, Poems, Poems, Rhymes, Riddles, Psychology, Song Lyrics & Analysis, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on June 6, 2018 by Drogo

listening to how i sang as a kid gave me the freedom i needed to try more with myself. I like half-poetry, half-chanting free-form songs for my voice; if i can focus on singing it how i want without caring about other instruments as much it is easier to sound ok I think. if i dont have to match every note exactly to something else, it becomes way easier. sort of like singing to a child, ‘professional stress’ is not a factor, we just use the voice we have as pleasantly or as silly as we want.

recording studios are really not better than just recording something meaningful, quality aside. since emotional quality doesnt depend on sound standards that are relatively the same. either way its someone pressing record, and then anyone can change it around later. vanity is funny, because if we dont want to look at ourselves in a mirror, it is usually because we think we would feel worse, however that means that by not doing it we are being more selfish to feel better, because we are afraid of not being good enough for whatever. Like when we dont want other people to look at an image we dont like of ourselves, when we think the image is not as good as we are, we are being vain. It is probably more humble to not be so concerned about how other people feel towards us either way.

the effort to record as in pressing record is not really a big deal. People make a bigger deal about how often they listen to themselves, superstitiously as though as many times as watching anything else will make them insanely vain and jinx their talent. society gives you a stereotype of how we should look and sound. I think thats the problem for a lot of people. Plus people tire of things easily, if they think they are getting nothing good out of it.

Self-esteem to want to listen to yourself, look at yourself, and learn from yourself is not usually the same as extreme vanity to the point of narcissism. The term narcissism has been over-used recently, like the word ‘creepy’, because we are all realizing how common it is to not understand things we see in each-other, that we consider different regarding ourselves. Some people are more sensitive to things, or caught up in psychological complexes than others, but really existence is a psycho-somatic mystery for all of us, even the ones that think they have solved it.

Be confident when you feel you need to express yourself and defend your work! If people do not like it, at least you were true to yourself, no matter how much they think you failed. Retrospect combined with empathy is actually how caring and considerate people judge things, not the history that psychopathic dictators think is justified in the name of ‘might is right’; this is usually a bigger problem than most of us will face by our own common whistling however.

Aeyla Goddess 13

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Appearance & Reality in Art

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Music Reviews, Philosophy, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on September 11, 2017 by Drogo

The best media that expresses the theme of appearance and reality, is the wide wonderful world of Art! One can assume that there are four sub-divisions of our sensorial existence in reality: visual reality, physical reality, olfactory reality, and audio reality; which are all dependent on each-other, and inter-connected with individual and group mental realities. There are also appearances of all our senses. A fifth sense could be considered to be our metaphysical imagination (spirit mind). Through drawing and painting visual arts, one experiences visual appearances and then mental appearance. Mental neocortical impressions of fantasy or reality, can be perceived in various combinations. That appearance can be taken to be the reality of what the art represents, until a later meditational analysis of our brains produces a different interpretation of our visual and mental reality, that we believe about the work of art; including what the art actually is, what it represents, and what it means to us or others.

For example, Pieter Bruegel the Elder based his detailed drawing work upon realistic observations, to represent figures and landscapes; however like Bosch, his art combines very surreal and fantastic aspects to what we can identify as figures and landscapes. Mental reality sinks in later, that his art cleverly pokes fun at the Christian Catholic Church. In fact, Bruegel ordered his wife to burn certain drawings because he thought they were “too biting and sharp”. Bruegel’s reality was hidden within the action, setting, and characters of his art works; because he was reluctant to openly admit his surreptitious views on the evils of society.

Bruegel earned his living producing drawings to be turned into prints for the leading print publisher Hieronymus Cock. His great successes were a series of allegories, which adopted many obsequious style mannerisms of his predecessor Hieronymus Bosch. In Bruegel’s works his sinners are grotesque, while the allegories of virtue wear odd head-gear. Imitations of Bosch sold well, like ‘Big Fish Eat Little Fish’ (Albertina), which Bruegel signed but Cock falsely attributed to Bosch in the print version.

Another example of a famous surreal artist is M.C. Escher. Maurits Cornelis Escher was brilliant for drawing impossible shapes, that appear to be possible 3-D objects at first due to his skillful rendering, but then reveal aspects of themselves to be mathematical line trickery upon further examination. Escher’s realism has 4 basic levels: structure, content, contour, and event integration. Structures in a drawing means 2-D surfaces are rendered with 3-D appearance, creating illusions of forms and spaces. Link structure with content phenomena, and form texture contours. Lastly, characters interact and integrate with setting events in a pluralistic world concept with recognizable motifs.

Salvador Dali is still the epitome of a modern surreal artist, even years after his death. Like other surreal artists, Dali leads the viewer’s mind through a maze, and then a sieve. Often his work is presented as being real in appearance, but in actuality is a painting, or photo, or film of dream-like illusions that are disturbing on a sub-conscious level. Dali creates appearance of fantasy, but the deeper Jungian subjective meanings are disturbingly hidden from casual glance.

Appearance and reality in music is strange to talk about, as we do not usually refer to sounding ‘realistic’, as we do with art appearing ‘realistic’. When music sounds real, we mean it sounds like a live orchestra or a real instrument, rather than an electronic synthesizer or recording. However music does create dramatic mental illusions with sound. Composers like Wagner, Mascagni, and Carl Orff were masters of telling audio stories to our hearing senses. Various musical instruments or voices can summon angry gods, peaceful landscapes, bold shining knights, beautiful flowers, and other associative feelings.

In poetry each verse gives an appearance to the reader or listener, and the reality derived is subjective. John Greenleaf Whittier’s poem ‘Snow Bound’ descriptively portrays New England life and structures during snow days. One can almost feel the cold of the snow, yet is kept warm by the brilliance of the writer’s passionate imagination. Lord Byron makes clear the emotions in many of his poems, creating ideal or realistic images within the reader’s head. Poets manipulate emotions with words, to engage the audience.

 

  •  [ from SCOD Thesis Philosophy Theories ]

Appreciation of Art

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Crafts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on March 15, 2017 by Drogo

It is impossible to know which people will like what, when I make a work of art. For me, I make what I want to create or provide for others, and if at least one other person values what I do enough to help me to live and keep creating, then I am as successful as I can be, on my own terms.

I can believe that my work is good using self-esteem, but experience has taught me humility with gambling on predictions that involve the ‘fickle’ human. If I have spent hours working on a project, of course I would like it to be valued by others, and at the very least my friends. However, in a society that places monetary value on some products that seem to have no quality, while neglecting most human lives as ‘worthless’, I can say with conviction that I do not know what I can make, that some one else cannot make better or cheaper in their own way. Who am I to say that they should not desire their own work or the work of someone else over mine? I am me, and all I can do is what I am able to do.

Thank you for any support you give to artists of any kind!!!

National Living Wages Value Artists

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Critical Commentary of Civilization, Economics with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 4, 2015 by Drogo

SCOD economic theory – Living Wage Revolution & The Arts

Artists are people too, and humans in American society have a right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. In the future all free people, including all Artists of all kinds (visual, dance, music, etc), should be supported as human beings, regardless of their abilities, economically by government funds on a ‘living wage’, paid for by wealthy corporation and Wall Street mega-business taxes. The price of food, shelter, and utilities should also be kept low, so as not to neutralize the value of money. Unregulated Capitalism and Inflation devalue human and monetary worth. These changes are needed, because throughout history all those who desire to make art, not as a hobby but as a living, have found that only a very few can do so, when governments are run by belligerent greedy assholes that prefer war over art. Many of the most otherwise peaceful and joyful victims of society get lost in deep cracks between the common work and under-funded shallow health-care systems. The common criticism that oppressing authorities have of socialism is that it ‘will allow people to be lazy while others work hard for the same amount’; and that is total bullshit because first of all those that are able to make more money with work would do so, as those that achieve more or better work will be rewarded extra pay and accolades for their accomplishments. Also working hard does not always produce better results than working smart, and those of us who become demoralized by lack of funding and no hope, would be motivated by the fact that we would be appreciated and given what we need to live our lives. Living wages could be reduced as legal penalties when laws are broken, and removed when incarcerated in prison institutions that provide their basic needs during their stay. In this way the greedy can still be greedy, but not at the expense of others that contribute greatly to civilization who have not been valued by economic systems as a whole since the dawn of history. An economic revolution is needed, and all artists should be leading it!

Circular Economy – Dame Ellen MacArthur

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Outdoor Festival for Nature Conservation

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 29, 2015 by Drogo

BRCES HFOF 2015

Festival of Nature Studies

This year I attended the ‘Harpers Ferry Outdoor Festival’ (HFOF) at the ‘Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship’ (BRCES), as I did last year; but with some important differences. This time I camped in the woods, and observed, took notes, and recorded nature while the event was happening. Rather than actively volunteering and vending a booth in the field, this year I began passively volunteering on site in the Spring to conduct nature studies over a larger area on the hundreds of acres of the property. I began camping in the woods before and during the festival in order to be more relaxed in the shade, with less possessions to worry about; yet still able to observe natural wildlife, take notes by hand in my ‘Gremlins’ note-book from the 1980s, and enjoy the country-fair type social event.

It was a dark and rainy Thor’s-day night at Demory Field. Luckily the volunteers had finished work for the day, and safety checks performed, so all was well. Time to relax with cold beer and smokey mist, rolling along the hillside. There was no lightning, but lightning-bugs lit up the fields, as summers before. It was a full-moon, but the rain clouds covered it. As I walked the dark trail through the woods, down to my camp site by Piney Run creek, I was comforted that although all was wet, from humidity and rain; at least my assistant Nacho and I had set up the tarps earlier before dark, to the best of our ability.

Darkness reminds me what it might be like to be blind. When I walk alone in the dark, I get a visual mental picture of what is ahead, then I turn my flash-light off for a short period of time that I feel confident enough to endure without sight. Even when my eyes cannot adjust to the dark, I am able to walk a ways until I begin to doubt my steps again, and I turn the light back on to see the path. It is cheating, compared to being blind, but it simulates a bit of not being able to rely on sight.

It rained all night, and the tent and tarp combination I used barely kept me dry. The temperature dropped down from 80s to 50s, so I was glad I had 2 sleeping bags and 2 sheets. Half of my gear got wet inside the tent. The ground was good for camping when it is not raining, as the clay has a continuous bed of soft clumps of abundant grasses and common wetland plants; so it was over-all level, but with bumps that allowed small puddles of water under the tent, held between the tarp, which normally works well to keep condensation from rising up from the ground when humidity drops at night. The lightning-bugs were freaky because when you are feeling alone, they can start to look like flash-lights.

Friday morning the rain stopped. I hung up my wet clothes on cord line. I started prepping a day pack to take up to the HFOF event at Demory Field. The start of festivals is always exciting, like Smurf village hustling and bustling. Down in the ‘Clearing’ light shines through the trees, like the promised land of golden-green paradise. Golden rays of sun-light shone through the trees, hinting of blissful utopian ideals; while the sounds of nature pervade the glen. Birds chirp, tweet, and sing songs. The deer were quiet, but I could hear their steps, as they crunch sticks on the ground. Insects scurried around plants, and some of the flying bugs made noises.

BRCES Site Flora

There were many common yard birds: cardinals, blue-jays, chickadees, tit-mice, sparrows, gold-finches, grackles, starlings, crows, and tiny marsh gnat catchers. Like tiny marsh sparrows in Georgia, the gnat catchers chirped like crickets or chipping sparrows. There were at least 3 types of woodpeckers; downy, red-headed, and the red-crested piliated. Owls were hooting, wild turkeys were gobbling, and thrushes were tutting like squirrel kisses. The BRCES wetlands are thriving. There were tons of long leaf 3′ tall plants; milkweed, golden rod, curled-dock (Rumex crispus), wild spinach, wild evening primrose, wheat and barley grass, jewel weed, similar looking forest floor cover that flowers like tiny pink bubblegum, razor bean vines, garlic mustard, poison ivy, virginia creeper, creeping through the clearings and the forest floor.

Willow trees have bent to survive flooding. Some willows created arches, that had good bodies and branches to tie tarps to, for shell shaped shelters. I did get a deer tick on me, which bit my arm, but did NOT give me lymes disease. The water was muddy from all the rain. The area that must have made the dam years ago, is very intriguing. I was told it was a man-made dam (earthen?) to make a pond, during the period the land was going to be developed into tract-housing. The ruins of houses and out-buildings were fun to explore around, and some of the boards had come loose on the windows. Daffodils and day-lilies grew nearby, remnants of old gardens.

The trees (20-70 years old) form woods that follow the rolling hills. Often the woods are sparse, but thorns and shrub bushes make dense thicket patches. Spiral trunks occur on one young tree per acre (apx.). Spiral trees seem to result from the influence of parasitic vines, like honey-suckle, but some trees out-live their vines. There are more young trees than old trees on the site. Although it is difficult to tell the age of a tree from the outside size, inside trunk rings are more accurate because growth rates vary. The most common trees seemed to be box-elder, oak, maple, ash, locust, poplar, sycamore, and willow. There were a few examples of great Beech trees as well.

Ideally trees provide shelter, food (fruits and nuts), and fuel for cooking and heating our fires. In turn humans should plant, care for, cultivate, and protect trees. Failure to look after each-other results in us cutting too many trees down, using poisons that hurt every-thing, and trees falling on houses and branches and sap falling on cars. Increased awareness of our trees is phenomenological respect for life. Respecting trees has a beneficial effect on our ecology. Sages know the wisdom of tree stewardship. Some trees have been alive for thousands of years. Fire-wood should be gathered mostly from dead-fall logs, branches, and twigs. Reducing dead-fall on forest floors can reduce wild fires.

Here is a list of local plant and tree types. All the families listed here are at least currently regional, if not native. Obviously not all types of vegetation are listed here, but it is a reasonable list: maples (common, red, silver), box-elder, sycamore, oaks (English, pin, black), ailanthus, mulberry, elm, willow, catalpa, princess, walnut (black), beech, sumac; fungi & plants: mosses, mushrooms, shelf-fungi, lichen, herbs, vegetables (wild leafy-greens and planted crops), blue-berries, vines, grasses, shrubs, ferns, thorns, nettles.

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Maple: Acer; Common (Norway), Silver, Sugar, Red; leaves deciduous broad palmate 3-5 lobes toothed; bark smooth-furrows; flowers tiny hermaphro, hetero, or bisexual; fruit paired wings (samaras); used for hard wood, sap (Sugar has most 32 gallons = 1 gallon of syrup = 4.5 pounds grain sugar).

Sycamore: Platanus; Occidentalis; leaves deciduous broad 3-9 lobes toothed; bark unique smooth but peeling brown-white patches; flowers tiny hermaphro, male stamin, female pistils; fruit 4 hairy nut-balls; used for hard wood, leaves similar to Common Maple (Plantanoides) but thicker and pointier.

Oak (Acorn): Fagus Quercus; English (Robur), Red (Rubra), Black (Veluntina), White (Prinus Rock Chestnut), Live (evergreen), Pin (Palustris); leaves deciduous alternate simple most toothed or lobed; bark rough furrows or scaly; fruit acorn nuts, white acorns and wood best; hard wood, nuts crushed and strained for Indian bread, yellow dye from bark powder, druid medicine.

Beech: Fagus Grandifolia; leaves deciduous simple single point, saw-toothed edges; bark smooth light grey; flowers – male hairball, female hairy red scales; fruit beech-nuts prickly burs; beechnuts edible, Beech is Saxon German for ‘book’; Oaks are in the same family, but far more common.

Elm: Ulmus; White (American), Hackberry (Celtis); leaves deciduous elliptical pointed saw-toothed rough (Hackberry has warts); fruit flat seed key (samara), Hackberry berries are edible and can taste sweet like dates. hard wood

Willow: Salix; Weeping (Chinese), Pussy (Discolor); leaves deciduous narrow pointed, edible; Weeping Willow have long catkins; Pussy Willows have fuzzy frons; bark rough furrows, makes an aspirin; soft wood soaks up water.

Poplar: Aspen Poplar (Salix Populus), Cottonwood (Salix Populus Aigeiros), Tulip Poplar (Lirio); Aspen and Cottonwood leaves deciduous simple broad triangular to circular or (rarely) lobed, breezes cause Aspen and Cottonwood leaves to flutter, giving the whole tree a ‘shimmering’ or ‘twinkling’ look; Tulip Poplar leaves are larger wide 6”, 4 lobes, ovate (heart-shaped); Aspen Poplar flowers are catkins; Tulip Poplar flowers are big yellow-orange with cones; Aspen Poplar fruit seeds are long hair tufts that float on wind; Tulip Poplar fruits are samara carpels; Tulip Poplar hard wood is the best Poplar wood; Aspen Poplar is soft wood; Cottonwood is so soft it does not even make good fire-wood. Tulip Poplar is not in the same DNA family as the other Poplars, and it also should not be confused with Tulip Magnolias (Magnolia Lili), whose deciduous leaves and flowers resemble evergreen Magnolias.

Walnut: Juglans; Black (American), English (Persian), White (Butternut), Hickory: (Carya), Pecan (Carya); leaves deciduous pinnate compound pointed; bark 4 types – Black has dark rough furrows, English has gray smooth with some rough furrows, Hickory has many deep furrows, Pecan flaky; flowers tiny hermaphro; fruit Nut large round green husk over brown shell; used for oil, decorative soft wood, nuts are food, ink and dye from nut husks, herbicide. Carya nuts (drupes) are food, nut husk conveniently splits, pecan nut fruit is similar to Walnut but skinnier.

Sumac: Anacardia; Rhus (Red), Toxico (White); shrub-tree; leaves deciduous pinnate compound pointed; staghorn fruit (drupe) conical clusters, Red is edible, White is poisonous with allergen urushiol; related to poison ivy and cashews. Soft short narrow wood, stems have soft pith hollow for pipes. Notes: often seen growing around rock out-croppings in fields or highway exit ramps.

Ailanthus (Tree of Heaven): Asian Altissima; leaves deciduous pinnate compound pointed; bark smooth to textured; flowers pungent odor, pollen; fruit long showy green-brown; soft wood, grows fast anywhere, toxic when burned or near water.

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HFOF 2015: Music Festivals as Wilderness Guardians

I attended the 2015 ‘Harpers Ferry Outdoor Festival’ (HFOF) at the ‘Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship’ (BRCES) because I believe in the concept of celebrating art and sport to preserve wild land and clean water. It is amazing to consider, during a recession based on commercial monopolies, that it is possible to support local talent and save our woods, forests, creeks, rivers, and the wild and free creatures whose lives depend on these environments. During an era where it is common for people to litter on their way to a job that pollutes natural ecology, events like HFOF are truly revolutionary and patriotic in Native American terms.

The BRCES land is beautiful; almost 1,000 acres of wilderness and a small organic farm run by a caring family. Years ago when I visited with my father, BRCES had just begun their mission on the land, and the old white house was over grown and in disrepair. Now the buildings and land are functional again, while being in harmony with the landscape. BRCES is truly a success story for environmentalists.

Volunteers run the show during HFOF. I was lucky enough last year to be a volunteer under the leadership of President Lisa Cullinane. Lisa is very friendly, kind, and smart; which by the way is my favorite kind of leader. We started preparing a few weeks before the event, and by the event I felt things were flowing well. Vendors are usually small businesses and non-profit organizations that rent spaces around the field, using tables and tents. I really enjoyed the variety of concessions, and the food and drink was good. There are always tensions and stress involved in any social production, but any problems that arose were resolved. Hundreds of people attended the festival both years I have been; although the first year my non-profit tent for ‘Sustainable Cooperative for Organic Development’ (SCOD), and my fine artist partners did not get visited by many people during the event, so we did not make any earnings. For me it was ok, because music is certainly a type of art; and I was happy to be there.

Camping among trees or in fields is one of the best things in Life. The first year I slept in my tent the first night, in Demory Field behind my vendor table. At night the humidity lifted, however this created a dew which saturated my books and artwork exposed to the sky; however items in the tent and oddly enough below the table-cloth were fine. The second day my art partners arrived and set up a tent to shade us a bit; which really helped survive a day of full sun in the field. I also wore sun-block, a large hat, and sunglasses so as to not be sun-burned. Some of us rented the white house for the second night, which was very nice indeed! Staying at the house was a relief from the electric generator that was kept running all night at the main field, to keep their fridge on to preserve the food. Also the best part of the field at the crest, had become over-crowded with vehicles; which in my opinion ruined the very purpose of being in Demory Field… in other words it turned the perfect camping spot into a parking lot. Despite traffic congestion, most reveled in the mirth, and many stayed up all night with enthusiasm and excitement!! So the second year, the parking situation on the hill was better. Also in 2015 I camped down at Piney Run creek for 2 nights, and put a hammock up in the woods the 3rd night. It was still good to have the house for bath-rooms, shelter from variations in weather, and back-up beds.

Bands begin playing the first evening (Friday), and folk music continues through the night, into the next day and night. The second night, Saturday, has the most people. Famous bands are fine, but when you have personal stock invested in local bands, hearing them play has more meaning. Although most of the show revolves around the main stage, my favorite part is playing with other musicians by the grand fire pit. The field has a natural amphi-theater shape around the fire pit; which was made by Boy Scouts with impressive stone work and movable wood benches, along with a cob oven. At night the fire pit area hosts musical jam sessions, which embrace the audience, allowing anyone to play with or with-out the bands; this is musical freedom and creative collaboration at its finest!!!

Lastly in this article I want to thank everyone that helped make HFOF happen. Some of my personal high-lights were being with friends, hiking the trails, and witnessing natural phenomena such as the lightning-bug show across the fields; those tiny lights were every-where even into and above the trees!! As I observed the natural light show, I meditated on how often our Nation’s founders enjoyed wonders that surpassed the magic of their technologies back then. Even today many scientists concede that our artificial efforts fail, in comparison to the energy efficiency of the natural world. Through places and gatherings like this, we can study how plant leaves photo-synthesize, and then we can learn make technology that does that for electricity. Thank you to those that stayed and picked up all the trash! I hate picking up litter, but I do it way too often and way too many people are littering. The sheer abundance of garbage is not encouraging regarding the future of humanity or civilization. At the event there are luckily enough volunteers to pick up all trash within sight, after many hours of pick-up. I like to return to the site days later, to double-check that the clean-up was effective. Any negative issues did not stop us from having fun, nor did any problems hinder the success of the event as a whole. The end of festivals is always sad, but there is a release and some contentment knowing that the quest is complete and memories are made. I also love mulberries, and the trees were in season! I definitely want to return next year to HFOF at BCRES, and be a part of music festivals (with arts and sports) that donate to wilderness stewardship, and take place within a nature preserve. Please come join us, if you are not already with us!!!!

– Rev.  ‘Drogo’

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* Drogo’s assistant Nacho, with camp site

Post-Bubble Recession Economics

Posted in Crafts, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Economics, Sustainability with tags , , , , , , , , on May 26, 2014 by Drogo

This article has presumptions based on post-911 and post-2007-recession data and experiences gathered by SCOD members.

1. Most of the money is being horded by 1% of the population (ultra-rich).

2. Upper-Middle Class are not hiring or spending as much as they should locally.

3. Monsanto and other Mega-Companies have monopolies that we can only break by collaborating on cooperative projects like eco-villages, organic gardening, gathering, hunting, home-made crafts, repairing reused items, etc….

Here is ‘real-talk’ about post-bubble economics…. people are lagging.  Instead of paying strangers to do things and buying products from companies, we need to intensively correspond about buying products and services from each-other; that is how we transition for real. Granted some companies are better than others, and some people are more talented or skilled than others. Regardless of flaws, the transition must take place.

We with SCOD are doing it, but I rarely find mundane people willing to seek out ways to give back. I am lucky enough to find some, and those I will stay in touch with. Even the most poor of us, can give back in their own ways when given gifts. Post-bubble recession economics, trade-for-trade with friends. Communicate, negotiate, exchange…. work it out. If someone does not pay you enough for your goods or services, tell them. If you think people are acting odd because they won’t talk to you about an issue of commodity, challenge them on it.

Work with those willing to work, and ditch those that will not participate. Enthusiasm and follow through, that is what we need. Do it people, do it. If someone calls you that you can trust, you better fricking call them back asap to get things done.

* SCOD FOOD COOPERATIVE:  Concept, Webpage

Banks are very selfish, because at all times they will always only give what benefits them more. That is because they function on basic Capitalist profit driven values. Even when they always make much more than they need, they NEVER return much of those profits back to the most poor who barely have enough money to put in an account. This is why interest rates from banks will be non-existent if they can help it (as we experience now).

Why are bank account interest rates are lower than they used to be?
Banks get money from the Fed at 0.75%
So the banks don’t need our money as much as they did before the Great Recession and Housing Bubble Collapse.  Also they make more on mortgages, and as long as interest stays low on mortgages, they do not want to raise our interest on accounts, even if it would entice us to invest more with them; they simply do not need our money, they make their own with the Fed.

Art Evolution

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance) with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 19, 2014 by Drogo

Everyone is an artist, just some realize it more than others. Art is any natural or artificial creation that is a design, whether intentional or not. Art needs no intention or viewer, and it does not matter what it is called; but the importance is in the contemplation of it, and conclusions it inspires.

To artists of all kinds, remember the folly of Metallica vs Napster and free your mind to flow with the evolution of the arts. Love and sharing should always come before hatred and snobbish stinginess. Relative “Quality” of the art is subjective, and in the arts is mostly opinion as it is not restricted to functionality. A trick of any trade is to be critical of the work of another, in order to make yourself look better. Some go to their grave never learning the lessons of Scrooge. Share your expressions with the World, and let others enjoy what you give or sell as they will. Most of the time you will be rewarded, and if any seek to hurt you despite your kindness, the hurt will fall back on them.

I have such a strong belief in an integrative transcendental theory of music, movies, and art, i am not sure i want to attend conventional shows anymore; to me the evolution of the arts is for people to fully support diverse artists as equals no matter how ‘talented’ or ‘successful’ the artists; and the artists must in turn consider the ‘fans’ as equals that can freely play with them, not just as observing members of their god-head cult who are unworthy to taint their ‘possessions’.

New Age Collaborative Art does require redefining terms, like changing ‘good quality’ to include collaborate improvisational spirit and skill relativism; and realizing that having skill should not be the same thing as being an exclusive snob ‘asshole’ or ‘dick’. It is fine to want to do your own art alone, or to want to make minimalist art solo; but that is very different than indulging egotism and selfishness as a demagogue or dictator. Modern art opened the definition of art to include the finger paintings of a child, mental patient, or even other animals; just as Philip Glass, Einsturzende Neubauten, and Nirvana opened the definition of popular music to include natural sounds, machine sounds, and otherwise ‘bad noises’.

I certainly feel possessive of ideas, things, and people often; but it i recognize it is often a source of social suffering when i do. Anger, hate, and isolation are natural feelings and actions; but we can decide how much we will allow from ourselves and others.

I was told all my life not to pursue a career in Art or Music because they dont make money; even my liberal artsy parents told me that… now after having died a few times and been reborn, i have a few things to say about that common statement. Popularity and Finances are only two aspects of the game called LIFE. First off we should not all strive to be Mega-stars who ‘make it big’ because the very concept is based on the framework of oligarchy and i do not want to encourage plutocracy. Secondly in an equal democracy of citizen artists we have the ability to schedule or freely live our own lives and walk out our doors without getting assaulted by pop-art-artsy (capitalist journalism). Thirdly i would rather live in a nut-house with no bills to pay, than not be able to draw or make noise.

“Copyright is an outdated concept.” – DJ Rainbow Wizard