Archive for AT

New Age Hope – Sacred Sites

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Hikes with tags , , , , , , , , on July 17, 2015 by Drogo

As I chew on some home-grown Native American tobacco I was given by my new friends, I reflect on the adventure I just had to a local ancient sacred site. I met with Cherokee and Lumbee Indians who showed me an un-excavated paleolithic stone site. To respect their privacy, I will not go into details of their names or how to get there; but it was a most exciting time! We spoke about how the Age of Aquarius is indeed transitioning out of the Age of Pisces (yes the ages go backwards), and things are changing. We talked about how languages do not have to be barriers, but are important tools for ‘coming to terms’ for sharing between cultures. We found out that we agree ‘agri-culture’ is for everyone (see article in Observer May 2015), and we want to preserve nature and farm land. We recognized the problems of ethnic-biased education, and the perpetual war machine of the MIC. Then they showed me the ancient stones in the gully below their beautiful house. The stones had significant orientation to each-other, according to solar orientation. There were clearly piles, circles, a spiral, and a serpentine line of stones. The rocks were of various composition, not the typical limestone of the area. It seems very possible that in the past (I will leave the dating to the archeologists) people used the stones for rituals involving the springs and the creek. Perhaps in this ‘New Age’ people of various cultural back-grounds will continue to come together for similar reasons. My indian friends have started a regional ‘Gathering’ for agri-culture, so yes the pattern shift has begun, and we are actively making it happen.

Tofu Lizard Memoir 04

Posted in Fictional Stories, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 22, 2012 by Drogo

SCOD Journal of Tofu Lizard Entry  04

Walking along the Trail, I crossed the mountain known as Loudoun Heights and came to the Tri-State gas station. Across the highway traffic-light intersection there was an arch made of wood, metal, and stone. I remembered seeing a photo of it on the SCOD website; and as I approached I saw the letters embedded in the arch: S-C-O-D. This was it! This was the place! I walked through the gate and up the gravel road that was shaded by trees. A small stream ran along below on one side of the road. I passed several driveways for small woodland dwellings. At the crest of the hill I walked beside a farm field. The sun shone down on the freshly tilled soil. Along the perimeter of the field was a ring of green growth, and several dwellings connected by a fence. I remember learning from the website about how the fence and houses enclosed, protected, and tended the field. Each of the field houses and forest houses were unique in design. Each structure utilized the elements of nature in their own ways.

I waved to some people in the field, and they waved back, although they were busy in conversation. I knew I should check in at the main building, so I kept on the road. Soon I came upon a garden glen of ruins. It was a memory garden to a long gone building that had been destroyed in a fire, with tall chimneys. Now a blacksmith shop skirted one of the chimneys, and flowing gardens made terraces of the hulking foundation. I could have stayed there all day just meditating, but I pressed onward.

Finally I reached the Medieval Tavern. Otherwise known as “The Pipedream Pub”, it was the primary building. The Pub acted as town hall, barracks, bed & breakfast, inn, tavern, hotel, gift shop, stage, dance hall, bar, restaurant, residence, private club, gallery, library, tourist attraction, and visitor center. There were a few figures hanging out in the porch area, as I approached. One of them was a farmer, one was a biker, and one was in period garb.

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Tofu Lizard Memoir 01

Posted in Fictional Characters, Fictional Stories, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 18, 2012 by Drogo

Tofu Lizard SCOD Journal Entry 1

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Prelude

I first learned about SCOD while I was working at my office job in DC. One day I was surfing the net, and came across the SCOD website. I read some articles, watched some videos, and I was hooked. I realized that the Sustainable Cooperative for Organic Development (SCOD) was just the type of concept I had been unconsciously formulating in my own mind for years. My parents were hippies, I had heard about communes, and my friends and I had researched alternative energy as a hobby for many years. It was becoming very difficult for me to justify my modern conventional lifestyle with the scientific theories that I was learning about; you know the usual liberal theories like Climate Change, Sustainable Architecture, and Environmental Pollution. Combine knowledge of science with history, throw in a dose of ethics or spirituality, and something like SCOD is an unavoidable conclusion for someone like me. Sorry, but it just is.

The following memoir I had written is a record of my participation in SCOD, and bits of my biography pre-SCOD to give you context and perhaps allow average readers to understand that I was pretty normal, despite the fact that I made a gradual (albeit huge) change in my life that was very different at the time. My story follows the events of me leaving my office job, hiking the Appalachian Trail, and finding SCOD.

… [continued in Entry 2]

SCOD Proposal to ATC

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, SCOD Thesis with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 3, 2011 by Drogo

SCOD Letter to Appalachian Trail Conference Members

This proposal letter to be accompanied by AT SCOD Book.

Harpers Ferry Appalachian Trail (AT) Headquarters

My Dear ATC Neighbors,

Please study and consider my book, AT SCOD: Appalachian Trail Sustainable Community for Organic Dwelling. SCOD was my Architecture Thesis for my Masters Degree in 2000 from the Savannah College of Art and Design, GA. In it you will find that I designed a “Sustainable Community for Organic Dwelling” which I feel is similar to the 1921 vision for the AT by Benton MacKaye. To me it represents one of the community farm camps that MacKaye desired to have along the Appalachian Trail. My summary of his ideas and conclusions in support of the agenda are included in the book.

I do not know your financial and legal situation as part of the National Park Service. However I would appreciate your opinion regarding how viable my proposal would be as an official AT Project. For years I have searched for funding and sponsors for this project to be built in the physical world but have not found enough to even begin with permission on a site. The site I chose in the book was only for the purpose of having a hypothetical setting, so naturally the designs would continue to evolve for another site.

Thank you for your consideration,

Walton D. Stowell II

Appalachian Trail SCOD Designer

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Benton MacKaye – Appalachian Trail Founder 1879-1975

Emile Benton MacKaye (Pronounced “McEye”)

Harvard University, US Forestry Service, Tennessee Valley Authority, US Dept. of Labor, Critic of Urban Sprawl, Author, Wilderness Society, Social Activist Hell Raiser, Originator of the AT in 1921, Patron of the B.M. Trail,

Geotechnics – balancing humans and wilderness

Original 1921 Vision of the Appalachian Trail

by Founder Benton MacKaye

(Summarized by Drogo for SCOD in 2011)

“An Appalachian Trail: A Project in Regional Planning”

 

Purpose:  Conservation, Recreation, Sanctuary, Health, Living, and Work

Functional Divisions:  Trail, Shelter, Community, and Work

Conclusions from Trail Experiences

AT Purposes Explained:

Conservation, Recreation and Sanctuary

“Throughout the Southern Appalachians, throughout the Northwoods, and even through the Alleghenies that wind their way among the smoky industrial towns of Pennsylvania, he recollects vast areas of secluded forests, pastoral lands, and water courses, which, with proper facilities and protection, could be made to serve as the breath of a real life for the toilers in the bee-hive cities along the Atlantic seaboard and elsewhere.”

Health (Physical and Psychological or Spiritual)

“The oxygen in the mountain air along the Appalachian skyline is a natural resource (and a national resource) that radiates to the heavens its enormous health-giving powers with only a fraction of a percent utilized for human rehabilitation. Here is a resource that could save thousands of lives. The sufferers of tuberculosis, anemia and insanity go through the whole strata of human society. Most of them are helpless, even those economically well off. They occur in the cities and right in the skyline belt. For the farmers, and especially the wives of farmers, are by no means escaping the grinding-down process of our modern life.

Most sanitariums now established are perfectly useless to those afflicted with mental disease – the most terrible, usually, of any disease. Many of these sufferers could be cured. But not merely by “treatment.” They need acres not medicine. Thousands of acres of this mountain land should be devoted to them with whole communities planned and equipped for their cure.

Living and Work

Next after the opportunities for recreation and recuperation our giant counts off, as a third big resource, the opportunities in the Appalachian belt for employment on the land. This brings up a need that is becoming urgent – the redistribution of our population, which grows more and more top heavy.”

AT Functional Divisions Explained:

Trail

The beginnings of an Appalachian trail already exist. They have been established for several years — in various localities along the line. Specially good work in trail building has been accomplished by the Appalachian Mountain Club in the White Mountains of New Hampshire and by the Green Mountain Club in Vermont. The latter association has already built the “Long Trail” for 210 miles thorough the Green Mountains — four fifths of the distance from the Massachusetts line to the Canadian. Here is a project that will logically be extended. What the Green Mountains are to Vermont the Appalachians are to eastern United States. What is suggested, therefore, is a “long trail” over the full length of the Appalachian skyline, from the highest peak in the north to the highest peak in the south — from Mt. Washington to Mt. Mitchell.

The trail should be divided into sections, each consisting preferably of the portion lying in a given State, or subdivision thereof. Each section should be in the immediate charge of a local group of people. Difficulties might arise over the use of private property — especially that amid agricultural lands on the crossovers between ranges. It might be sometimes necessary to obtain a State franchise for the use of rights of way. These matters could readily be adjusted, provided there is sufficient local public interest in the project as a whole. The various sections should be under some sort of general federated control, but no suggestions regarding this form are made in this article.

Not all of the trail within a section could, of course, be built all at once. It would be a matter of several years. As far as possible the work undertaken for any one season should complete some definite usable link — as up or across one peak. Once completed it should be immediately opened for local use and not wait on the completion of other portions. Each portion built should, of course, be rigorously maintained and not allowed to revert to disuse. A trail is as serviceable as its poorest link.

The trail could be made, at each stage of its construction, of immediate strategic value in preventing and fighting forest fires. Lookout stations could be located at intervals along the way. A forest fire service could be organized in each section which should tie in with the services with the services of the Federal and State Governments. The trail would immediately become a battle line against fire. (accompanying map proposed trail location)

Shelter Camps

These are the usual accompaniments of the trails which have been built in the White and Green Mountains. They are the trail’s equipment for use. They should be located at convenient distances so as to allow a comfortable day’s walk between each. They should be equipped always for sleeping and certain of them for serving meals; after the function of the Swiss chalets. Strict regulation is required to assure that equipment is used and not abused. As far as possible the blazing and constructing of the trail and building of camps should be done by volunteer workers. For volunteer “work” is really “play.” The spirit of cooperation, as usual in such enterprises, should be stimulated throughout. The enterprise should, of course, be conducted without profit. The trail must be well guarded against the yegg-man and against the profiteer.

Community Groups

These would grow naturally out of the shelter camps and inns. Each would consist of a little community on or near the trail (perhaps on a neighboring lake) where people could live in private domiciles. Such a community might occupy a substantial area; perhaps a hundred acres or more. This should be bought and owned as a part of the project. No separate lots should be sold therefrom. Each camp should be a self-owning community and not a real-estate venture. The use of the separate domiciles, like all other features of the project, should be available without profit.

These community camps should be carefully planned in advance. They should not be allowed to become too populous and thereby defat the very purpose for which they are created. Greater numbers should be accommodated by more communities, not larger ones. There is room, without crowding, in the Appalachian region for a very large camping population. The location of these community camps would form a main part of the regional planning and architecture.

These communities would be used for various kinds of non- industrial activity. They might eventually be organized for special purposes for recreation, for recuperation and for study. Summer schools or seasonal field courses could be established and scientific travel courses organized and accommodated in the different communities along the trail. The community camp should become something more than a mere “playground”: it should stimulate every line of outdoor non-industrial endeavor.

Work at Farm Camps

These might not be organized at first. They would come as a later development. The farm camp is the natural supplement of the community camp. Here is the same spirit of cooperation and well ordered action the food and crops consumed in the outdoor living would as far as practically be sown and harvested.

Food and farm camps could be established as special communities in adjoining valleys. Or they might be combined with the community camps with the inclusion of surrounding farm lands. Their development could provide tangible opportunity for working out by actual experiment a fundamental matter in the problem of living. It would provide one definite avenue of experiment in getting “back to the land.” It would provide an opportunity for those anxious to settle down in the country: it would open up a possible source for new, and needed, employment. Communities of this type are illustrated by the Hudson Guild Farm in New Jersey.

Fuelwood, logs, and lumber are other basic needs of the camps and communities along the trail. These also might be grown and forested as part of the camp activity, rather than bought in the lumber market. The nucleus of such an enterprise has already been started at Camp Tamiment, Pennsylvania, on a lake not far from the route of the proposed Appalachian trail. The camp has been established by a labor group in New York City. They have erected a sawmill on their tract of 2000 acres and have built the bungalows of their community from their own timber.

Farm camps might ultimately be supplemented by permanent forest camps through the acquisition (or lease) of wood and timber tracts. These of course should be handled under a system of forestry so as to have a continuously growing crop of material. The object sought might be accomplished through long term timber sale contracts with the Federal Government on some of the Appalachian National Forests. Here would be another opportunity for permanent, steady, healthy employment in the open.

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“Let’s put up now to the wise and trained observer the particular question before us. What are the possibilities in the new approach to the problem of living? Would the development of the outdoor community life, as an offset and relief from the various shackles of commercial civilization, be practicable and worth while?”

Conclusions from Trail Experiences:

Clean Air (Trees and plants make Oxygen and filter out pollution)

Deep Thoughts from an Environmental and Agricultural Perspective

Naturalist Observations for the sake of Science and Resource Conservation

MacKaye’s proposal was an American Post-WWI social, political, planning, and development agenda of the first order. As all good utopian plans it is both philosophical and pragmatic. With the help of Avery and Whitaker the Appalachian Trail was completed in 1937.

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