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Delft TU Library, Holland

Posted in Education / Schools, Futurist, Sculpture, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 26, 2018 by Drogo

Central Library of Delft University of Technology (TU) in Holland by Mecanoo Architects

This angular and environmentally dynamic library was opened in 1998. It was designed by Mecanoo Architects, which was a 61 person firm located in Holland near Delft TU. The library design was based on four themes: The adjacent pre-existing Auditorium (by Van den Broek & Bakema), the site absence of campus atmosphere in the university quarter, the need for advanced technology, and of course plenty of room for shelves of books.

delft mecanoo 5

It is a “Triangle of Glass and Grass”, with a large tee-pee like ‘Cone’ in the middle. The glass around a few sides allows a large amount of day-light inside. The grass sod roof brilliantly allows people to use the entire area of building as they would a yard, in addition to the library. The center cone allows natural light also, and a communal study space.

delft_mecanoo_entrance

The grassy roof lawn of the Delft TU Library forms a harmonious whole with the campus walkways that emerge from underneath the adjoining assembly hall. The Library roof can be walked upon, but also offers a place of dreaming, reading, and picnicking under open luminous sky. Teachers, students, and visitors call all meet informally in this public space.

delft mecanoo 3

The concrete / stucco Cone structure is open topped and 150 ft. high. The Cone and the cavernous entry are the only main features that are seen from campus, so it appears as though most of the building is not there. On the other sides, the wildly-canted glass wall rises from the parking lot to a max height of about 14 meters (40 ft.). At night the glass wall glows exposing activity within the 4 levels of library stacks, study areas, offices, and storage. The grassy roof shoots across the site creating a gently sloping area in contrast to the nearby ‘Brutalist’ style Auditorium.

delft center circle

Changing illumination (luminous flux) upon the Cone accentuates the sculptural shape as an abstract Platonic solid form, partially deconstructed. The channeling aspect of the Cone shape is intentional, as it is conducive to gathering with focus. The glass walls are towards the North, so they get non-direct ambient light. Horizontal bands around the glass facade facilitate ventilation between the window panes, and give distorted impressionist reflections from the outside on sunny days.

 

The perforated roof overhand is supported by stilted tubular steel struts, and rises from a foundation perimeter plinth-bed of fine stones. Under most of the structure is a spacious hall. A ring of glass circumscribes the Cone at roof level, allowing natural light (solar lumens) to wash in along the curved white stucco funnel side.

Delft University of Technology Library (DUTL) stocks one of the largest technical book collections in the World. Most of the books are stored in stock-rooms in the basement, but those that are accessible to the public are arranged in a single enormous book-case and are within hand reach. The combination of books, computers (with internet and catalogs), and people allows for knowledge, interaction, and better citizens. 300 out of 1000 study spots are equipped with computers (this may have increased).

This ‘Library as landscape’ evokes the feeling of how our ancestors believed technology to be magical, and magic arts were held by their spirits under hills to keep it safe. Not only priests and royal family members are allowed to visit this sacred place of tomes, it is open to all that seek it.

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(4) History & Politics

Posted in History, Psychology, SCOD Thesis with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 31, 2011 by Drogo

Introduction to SCOD History & Politics

 

The History of the World is important because it helps us to know our place within it. We design and build architecture to shelter ourselves and future generations, so we must plan accordingly. Although we cannot know the future for certain, we can learn from History and see patterns of floods, famines, droughts, plagues, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, wars, and revolutions. We can use this knowledge to be wiser in our decisions about where to build, when to build, and how to build. We can only hope that some of this wisdom is used in politics, but history has shown we can be doubtful of that.

The Ancient World had two Empires that our Modern Empire is based on; The Greek and Roman Empires. Both of these Empires achieved more than any on record before, and both of course fell after a few hundred years to barbarians and political strife from within. There were many people living within those Empires that believed their Empire would never fall, but fall they did.

Modern History teaches us that Corporate Industries are like Kingdoms that fund our Empire. They lobby our Representative Politicians with money, and so they cannot be replaced by informed democracy, because in a Commercial Capitalist system, money is power. This Oligarchy promotes fear, greed, and entrenched corruption. If Big Business is the basis of our new Empire, we should not submit to them entirely, for they will fall as History has shown us. The will of the people is subjective to propaganda, to their advantage or against it. Currently the dominant Commercial Propaganda is against the good of individual rights and liberties. We should design to retain some of our independence, so that when the time comes, if it comes within our life-time, we better prepared for the collapse of the system.

SCOD Thesis: History & Politics (general and modern movements) Audio Recording

SCOD Great Debate ShowTotalitarianism Vs. Humanitarianism part 1

SNU – Peace Vs. WarMilitary Spending Interview

SCOD Hypno-HistoryAncient Classical Philosophy

Two SCOD Constitutions

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The House That Jack Built

Posted in Song Lyrics & Analysis with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 10, 2010 by Drogo

The Legacy of Jack the Carpenter

Jack may not have been an architect, but it is usually assumed that he was the farmer/carpenter that built the ‘house’ (which is clearly a barn), rather than just the owner that did not even help during construction. If Jack was just the owner, it most likely would be “The House That Jack Owned”, or “The Home of Jack”, or “Jack’s House”. Also if Jack was the carpenter who built the barn on a farm, it was likely that he was also a farmer; as building timber frame structures is part of the agrarian legacy.

Regardless there is an architecture to the story, as it builds upon itself. Each verse becomes larger than the previous, as it includes all lines that were established prior. This narrative story type is called cumulative chain.

Even though it is a rhyme usually spoken, it is also listed as a folk song (Roud Index). There are Jewish and Arabic medieval examples, that predate nursery rhymes. Other popular cumulative chain songs to build upon previous lines are: “There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly” and “The Twelve Days of Christmas“.

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT

Original with Jack as carpenter-farmer

Mother Goose nursery rhyme from the 1500-1600s

Classified as an Aarne-Thompson cumulative chain tale

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This is the house that Jack built.

This is the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the farmer Jack sowing his corn,
That kept the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

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Wind Turbine Construction

Posted in Alternative Architecture, Sustainability with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 4, 2010 by Drogo

From Melrose Plant:

Switch to fuels that can be produced from rapidly renewable or constantly renewed resources. Let’s get alternative energy, from the natural sources.  Build the alternative systems into the mainstream by mass marketing, and they will consume. It must become more than trendy, it must become as sexy, fun, and patriotic as joining the military during World War II.