Archive for country

My Violin Playing Memories

Posted in Music Reviews, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 30, 2020 by Drogo

I played susuki style classical violin for years in my early teens during the late 1980s (along with soccer and martial arts classes). I had a very good teacher who lived in an old school house down by the river in Millville. She taught us at the Methodist Church and her home filled with her husband’s car parts. We performed at Wolftrap and the Kennedy Center in large student groups. If i had learned fiddling it might have been more fun for me and i might have kept doing it, but the only fiddler i knew was Bruce Wilkin, but he was busy working a regular job; so i made Chance McCoy listen to Bruce on CD with me since we were both into Celtic music. i will never forget we were in Chance’s shed in the early 1990s, and i told him to listen for the imperfections, that is how you know it is real played lively without editing. i said Bruce is playing for the joy of it, and maybe in some moments for whatever reason he might sound slightly off, but that doesn’t matter. He does the best he can and that is good enough, because it evokes fun feelings. Chance barely played the guitar back then as he was starting out, but he still jammed with me on keyboard; and he went on to learn how to play the violin and other instruments, and win a grammy with fiddling and other folk style music playing. I used Bruce’s CD in a college film, with his kind non-profit permission.   – Drogo

Urban vs Rural Living Differences

Posted in Organic Development, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on September 3, 2017 by Drogo

Living in an Urban City is different than living in the Rural Country, in a few ways. Civilization and Wilderness both have advantages and disadvantages when contrasted with each-other (pros and cons). People that love cities tend to focus on night-life, restaurants, and dependence on technology. People that love the country tend to focus on tranquility, nature, and independence from artifice. Fans of both often talk about their flow within the setting, and desired emotions evoked.

Associated Generalizations of

Urban / Rural

expensive / affordable

artificial / natural

utilities / agriculture

technology and shows / plants and animals

crowded crazy people / isolated crazy people

congested & stressed / relaxed & lazy

sidewalks / no sidewalks

complex / simple

no stars / stars

loud / quiet

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Urban + Rural = Suburban Sprawl – Wilderness

One of the major planning issues has become Suburban Sprawl. Frank Lloyd Wright was one of the first American architects to address the problem of sprawl in his Broadacre City design. Broadacre city was a modern blend of libertarian and futurist urban, industrial, and agricultural aspects important for civic functions.

(add SCOD thesis essays on sprawl)

 

 

 

 

Appalachian Rap Music

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Music Reviews, POB Audio with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 1, 2013 by Drogo

AMM – Appalatian Mountain Malitia

AMM graf

Yes there are colored people in West Virginia; and they are not afraid of representing their home State WV!! In fact the first free black college in America was in Harpers Ferry, WV; Storer College. From a rich African-American cultural heritage mixed with white “caucasians” for generations; some have been rapping and recording their music for over decades now since MTV began. Although modern multi-media has affected cultural style and subject matter, it does not replace their heritage; rather there is an evolution of expression. In the Harpers Ferry area, some renaissance men have been leading and waging an under-ground musical revolution. In Harpers Ferry there is an historic tradition of revolution.

One such Harpers Ferry musical revolutionary from black-roots is Donald Greene. Together with his circle of friends (many local), they have been doing their thing… all the while having fun. These artists have had to wear many hats to pay bills and play artistically. These new underground pioneers are artists, musicians, producers, writers, film-makers, and more. There is no public funding or venue to sell what they do, yet they do it just to do it. Here we will explore Interviews, Albums, and other aspects of AMM Appalachian Rap Music.

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Freestyle 2006 audio cassette tape “John Brown n Shadows” – JB, Arob, Mike Fields, Paul

A: JB & Arob (14 tracks): Sycamore, Union Street, Union Freestyle, Showbiz Ridin, Metamorfosiz, Fight Klub, Rambone Shaka, Billigoat Gruff, Dungeon Kreep, Transformuz, Shadow Talknik, Frak Niggas, Ladies Bombaz (Brown Shugga), Booty Shake, Caribbean Rap

B: Beat Boxing w Paul (3 tracks); Slugging w Mike Fields (5 tracks): Thug Snappa, Robo Pirates, Gonna Get It On, Tree Thugga, Circus Dont Stop; JB & Arob (3 Reggae Beat tracks); Local Party recording (w Keith, Doug, DG, Deena, etc)

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24 Tracks 2007 : JB Codiak & Arob & friends

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AMM 2013-2019: Obama-Nation  

AMM Intro, AMM Anthem, Return of JB, What it Is, Morbit, Serial Killa, Dark Echoes, JB Fort, Jeff Rock, In God’s Hands, … 

AMM 2020-2040: Trump’s Dumpster 

Skeletor MOTU Rap, A-Rob productions, Freestyle tracks,

 

 

Blackberry Cove Herbal Book

Posted in Book Reports, Food & Drink, Medical, Nature Studies, Organic Agriculture & Horticulture, Organic Gardens, Pagan, Trips, Walks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 24, 2013 by Drogo

BLACKBERRY COVE HERBAL by Linda Rago

West Virginia Wise-woman healing with wild herbs in the Appalachian Mountains; according to organic, rural folk-traditions.

BookCover-frontBC Cover 3

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2nd Edition (Full Color):  Paperback book

2nd Edition (Full Color Illustrated):  Kindle ebook

2nd Edition (Greytone Illustrated):  Paperback book

3rd Edition (Text Only):  Kindle ebook

Interview with the Author Linda Rago 

Audio Recording of Monthly Chapters

Audio Recording of ‘Spiral Gift‘ Chapter

Audio Recording of ‘Grandmother’s Methods

Audio Recording of ‘Herbal Healing

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CAHOKIA: North America’s Largest Woodhenge & Temple Mound

Posted in ecovillages, Historic Architecture, Pagan, Trips with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 11, 2010 by Drogo

CAHOKIA MOUNDS PARK

Cahokia Mounds is currently a State Historic Site. Cahokia is the area of an ancient city built around 600–1400 CE. It is near present day Collinsville, Illinois across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, Missouri.

The Cahokia Mounds were named after a clan of historic Illiniwek people living in the area when the first French explorers arrived in the 17th century. As this was centuries after Cahokia was abandoned by its original inhabitants, the Cahokia were not necessarily descendants of the original Mississippian people. The city’s original name is unknown.

The 2,200 acre site originally included 120 man-made earthwork mounds over an area of six square miles, although only 80 survive. Cahokia Mounds is the largest archaeological site related to the Mississippian Late Woodland culture, which developed advanced societies in North America, centuries before the arrival of Europeans.

It is a National Historic Landmark and designated site for state protection. In addition, it is one of only twenty UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the territory of the United States. It is the largest American Indian earthen construction in the Americas north of Mexico.

They used woven baskets to move most of the earth to build the mounds and plazas. In every culture there are usual social, political, spiritual, and defense reasons to place buildings on raised bases. In the case of Cahokia, there is an added reason: the site is on a flood plain near the Mississippi River.

Monks Mound

Monks Mound is the largest structure and central focus of the city. It is a massive mound with four terraces, 10 stories tall, and the largest man-made earthen mound north of Mexico. Facing south, it is 92 feet high, 951 feet long and 836 feet wide.

Excavation on the top of Monks Mound has revealed evidence of a large building, likely a temple used by the Chief and shaman for residence and public functions. This building was about 105 feet long and 48 feet wide, and could have been as much as 50 feet high. It was about 5,000 square feet.

Cahokia Woodhenge

This woodhenge, like others found in Europe, was a circle of posts used for cosmic alignments relevant to agriculture. It stood to the west of Monk’s Mound. Archaeologists discovered Woodhenge during excavation, and noted that the placement of posts marked solstices and equinoxes. Woodhenge was rebuilt several times during the urban center’s roughly 300-year history. There were probably other woodhenges in America over the centuries, as one was discovered near Mound 72, south of Monks Mound.

A beaker found in a pit near the winter solstice post bore a circle and cross symbol that for many Native Americans symbolizes the Earth and the four cardinal directions. Radiating lines probably symbolized the sun, as they have in countless other civilizations. During excavation of Mound 72, archaeologists found a birdman burial for a leader, and 250 other skeletons from around 1000 CE. Other mounds had workshops for copper smiting and trading.

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Maple Tree Campground

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Nature Studies with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 11, 2010 by Drogo

Woodland Campground in Maryland

Near Gathland, Boonesboro, and Harpers Ferry.

Townsend Road, Washington County, MD

A Blind Hammer Destroys What It Cannot See

Posted in Film Reviews, Military, Sustainability with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 30, 2010 by eposognatus

This week President Obama announced a proposal for a three-year spending freeze on all domestic programmes, with the sole exception of defense spending. Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD) precisely echoes my feelings on this, saying “Defense represents a significant part of our discretionary spending in this country. The defense establishment needs to be under fiscal discipline, as do all of our agencies… I don’t think defense should be exempt. If there are extraordinary things that occur that require us to respond for national security, we always will be prepared to do that. But to exempt the normal military spending just because it’s military, to me, is wrong.”

The idea that the military and actions conducted by it or in the name of defense should take ultimate precedent over all others is both pervasive and baffling. Senator Cardin was being modest when he said that defense accounts for a “significant” part of discretionary spending, as it is in fact a majority. According to the Office of Management and Budget, military spending comes to about $657 B for 2009, as compared to $584 B on all other non-defense discretionary spending. For perspective, $45.4 B went to the Department of Education, the DOE got $25 B, NASA received $17.2 B and the National Science Foundation… $6.9 B. We can perhaps agree that yes, the military is an expensive machine, and that these costs do not pay solely for guns and bombs, but the livelihoods and careers of thousands of men and women. There is also arguable benefit in national defense, peacekeeping, disaster relief, and other causes…

However, can these pursuits not be met through other, non-military means? I think the answer is a simple and emphatic “yes.” Yet there seems to be a long-standing and strongly socially enforced attitude that the military in some way is privileged to remain faultless and unanswerable even when its function is questionable or ineffective. It is perfectly accepted to put a sticker on one’s car stating that a son or daughter is in military service, but to proclaim “My son is a scientist,” invites confusion if not ridicule.

This is merely a prelude to a question that I have pondered increasingly of late. That if one browses television programming, there can be found a number of highly dramatic, over-the-top “edutainment” shows devoted to the military, warfare, weapons, and combat. There is of course a “Military History” channel, and popular shows go by names like “Future Weapons” and “Deadliest Warrior,” while in contrast the NASA channel features exciting offerings like “STS-130 Crew News Conference” and “ISS Mission Coverage.” Which titles do you figure will draw the attention of the average viewer at home? I think it’s clear, and it’s also undeniable that we all enjoy a good explosion or demonstration of the destructive capabilities of the human species. It’s fun and somehow liberating to see such carnage, but it is invariably dissociated from the suffering, pain, and death they are designed to inflict.

The decision to create shows on certain topics, what their titles are, and their content are all choices. Almost invariably, these choices are made to generate profit, but I am not convinced that these choices are made to meet a market demand. Rather, I feel that the programming drives a market. The reality TV genre is evidence of this, and so to are many products (when did we last have input on the type of car that should be built by GM?). Governments and corporations alike have at their disposal the best and brightest designers and marketeers, and spend a lot of time and effort making sure we buy what they sell. If the same energies were put towards selling science and exploration, I cannot see why the latest developments in aerospace technology, bio-engineering, or space exploration could not be topics of conversation around the water cooler just as much as “American Idol.”

This may sound hopelessly romantic, naïve… even absurd. However, we are faced with an interesting pop culture phenomenon which shows it is not. James Cameron’s Avatar is now closing in on $2 B in box offices sales worldwide, and an ask around will show you this is not because of the story, or the even the spiffy 3-D effects, but because we have been presented with a coherent, believable new world to explore and discover. A new people, a new language – a new frontier. A frontier reached through technological means (whether through spaceflight as in the film, or through new film-making techniques, as in the theatre), yet presenting a world of natural beauty and celebrating its divinity and defense. For some, the excitement of this new world will not extend beyond their 160 minutes of entertainment, for others, it may be a life-changing phenomenon. Some even experience depression at returning to their “ordinary” existence. This needn’t be so, for the wonders of Pandora are real and all around us, and we still have a chance to explore and preserve them. Avatar and its success shows us that people do yearn for other worlds, and that when presented properly, they will gladly empty their wallets to explore them. Why can we not mimic this enthusiasm for reality, which is not so very different when put into the proper light?

In the 1972 film Silent Running, As in Avatar, the Earth is a blighted, ruined place, and here the last of the planet’s trees have been put aboard spacecraft to preserve them. While back on Earth there is “hardly any more disease, no more poverty, [and] nobody’s out of job.” The main character Lowell is incensed by the lassitude of the rest of the crew, saying, “Well you know what else there’s no more of? There’s no more beauty, and there’s no more imagination, and there are no frontiers left to conquer, and you know why? Only one reason why! One reason why! The same reason you three in this room are giving me today, and that is, nobody cares!

Like Lowell’s shipmates, many of us are content to sit back and watch what TV execs think we want, purchase goods from corporations who think they know what we desire, and eat foods with no other care than that it is cheap and easy. We accept that the government will spend more money on the military than our education, and for the most part, do not even concern ourselves about it. Whether 1972 or 2009, the message is the same – the wealth of our world is all around us, and it is worth fighting for. Where might we be if we were as financially committed to destroying cancer as we are to combating “terrorism”? What if we glorified blasting off into space as much as we did blasting holes in the ground of Iraq and Afghanistan? Or in saving lives instead of destroying them? While money cannot solely provide the answer to these questions, it certainly doesn’t hurt, and taking funding away from already paltry budgets of non-military research and development is inexcusable. It may be difficult to see how any one of us can make a difference, but remember, none of us are as dumb as all of us.


Yes, that Peter Schickele.