Archive for disorder

Social Anxiety at Public Parties or Pubs

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Psychology, Pub Library with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 19, 2013 by Drogo

Public Parties, Pubs, Clubs, or Bars and Social Anxiety

Thoughts by Drogo Empedocles –

The older I get, the more freakishly strange it feels to go to bars; its always been an odd feeling because it is so different than the rest of society… and yet not odd enough for me, i cant quite explain it.

I am not straight-edge, and I do not consider myself a drug ‘addict’; I strive for moderation most of the time, in most things. However I do like to ‘get out every-once in a while’ and be social, or even host parties; so i would like to express some feelings i have regarding the psychological issues i experience.

Even just to go for music it trips me out. People at parties are a different experience, i remember first learning this at my house as a kid when my parents had Gallery Shows. Some of the social anxiety pressure i think has to do with the amplified volume of collective energy, emotions, and noise. Voice volume gets raised, just to have a conversation or say anything at all; then by nature it feels aggressive or hostile even.

Differences between people aside, im wondering if it is simply the odd condition of people relating to each-other in a much more familiar way than outside the bar? I think it makes it very strange when someone does not interact by those rules in some way, whether being quiet or not wanting to be touched in anyway, etc…

Diversity is important, but it makes for interesting dynamics. Hunter vs Prey scenarios, and what-not. It is funny because im such a sensual and compassionate person at heart, im cool with mutual public affection of common forms, but i realize some other people are not for various reasons, including relationship contracts; and therefore this presents ‘issues’. Usually the most gregarious types of people will be the ones at the party or bar, yet there will inevitably be a minority of introverts or people hostile to affection.

At this point I do not have many conclusions. Perhaps it is simply best to generally avoid the conflict of personalities in any public setting, especially parties and bars.  Yet parties and bars are considered the most fun, and appropriate for Holidays and Celebrations! Hmmmm. I guess I’m somewhere in the middle on all of this, since I am a compassionate introvert at heart, that does occasionally like the thrill of adventure.

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Emotional Impulsive Disorder – EID

Posted in Psychology with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 21, 2012 by Drogo

This mental (or personality) disorder is based on several sources including “Stop Walking On Eggshells: Taking Your Life Back” and ‘The Unquiet Mind’.  This article uses EID to re-label and re-organize BPD, because the abv. BP could be confused with Bi-Polar, and the original 9 criteria are repetitive and confusing.

BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER – BPD

BORDERLINE SCHIZOID DISORDER: Neurosis & Psychosis

EMOTIONAL IMPULSIVE DISORDER – EID

mood shifts (manic-depressive more frequently than bipolar), overwhelming anxiety, unpredictable impulsive actions, frustratingly poor decisions, perplexing behaviors, control issues, manipulative tendencies, “party” or “player” relationship attitude, overly distrusting, delusions, paralyzingly sensitivity to surroundings, behaving irrationally, having a chaotic life.

People with this intense emotional and impulsive disorder need to take responsibility for their own behavior, but often simply cannot no matter how much they try or say they want to. Codependent friends and relatives need to define and keep their boundaries, to limit enabling wrong behaviors.

Emotional Roller-coaster: what it is like having EID.

  1. feel more intensely emotional ups and downs

  2. act more extreme because of over-whelming emotions

  3. difficulty regulating emotion and behavior – mental & physical chaos

Most people have all the same types of thoughts and almost all the feelings as EID, but the line is drawn at the frequency and intensity of irrational EID behaviors. As with addicts, it is intense destructive behavior that tends to demand diagnosis.

EID cannot be changed through force, because they will always tend to rebel against any authority (even role-models that they chose), just as they rebel against self-control. EID uses their will-power to resist addressing stresses that most people use their will-power to address on a regular basis. EID resistance and avoidance ironically creates more stress for them, if not immediately, then later. Many of these symptoms are also used as coping mechanisms, and so they are very difficult to change. Everyone is different, and a mental diagnosis does not explain everything.

In dealing with EID it is not only important to explore possible CAUSES of actions, but it is vital to realize the RESULTS of actions; because EID actions often have very sad consequences. By assessing the results of behaviors, we can set limits.

EID Criteria  (Diagnosis should be dependent on meeting all 8 symptoms)

1.  Isolation – intense fear of abandonment or feeling alone, depressive tendencies

2.  Emptiness – intense apathy, lack of self-esteem, psychosis tendencies

3.  Self-Destructive / Suicidal Behavior – psychotic including dangerous life-threatening addictions

4.  Impulsive / Unstable Moods – paralyzing stress and anxiety from a range of intense emotions always changing back-and-forth within minutes or hours in a day.

5.  Impulsive / Unstable Regulation – intense anger resulting from moods

6.  Impulsive / Unstable Relationships – refusal or inability to take responsibility for their own actions regarding other beings

7.  Impulsive / Unstable Identity – social chameleon w/ schizo-breaks, no clear ‘self’

8.  Delusions – re-occurring irrational paranoia, or intense dis-associative attitude

Recovery is possible but not probable. Combined therapy and medication will improve cases.

Psychotherapy Psychotherapy is the core treatment for borderline personality disorder. Two types of psychotherapy that have been found effective are:

  • Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). DBT was designed specifically to treat borderline personality disorder. Generally done through individual, group and phone counseling, DBT uses a skills-based approach to teach you how to regulate your emotions, tolerate distress and improve relationships.
  • Transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP). TFP centers on the relationship between you and your therapist — helping you understand the emotions and difficulties that develop in that relationship. You can then use what you have learned in other relationships.

Medications Medications can’t cure borderline personality disorder, but they can help associated problems, such as depression, impulsivity and anxiety. Medications may include antidepressant, anti-psychotic and anti-anxiety medications.

Emotional Spectrum Chart – mammals have complex combinations daily. It is difficult dealing with anyone who has EID, because many of us have some of the symptoms, but not all of them so intensely; so their moods affect ours, and vice versa, which tends to make things worse, as even our positive moods may not affect them in a good way.

Emotion Chart