Archive for Dwellings

Faery Architecture

Posted in Alternative Architecture, Fictional Stories, Sculpture, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on October 10, 2016 by Drogo

Faery Architecture – from Harpers Faery Chronicles

Homes are often an important part of our life sagas. Also homes can tell stories through the architecture and art on the walls. Dwellings are places where stories are told and rigamaroles take place, which we interpret. Faery architecture uses organic shapes and natural materials, altered by magic.

Faery home shapes are traditionally round in various ways. Popular inspirations for circle plans with curved walls and domes include the Sun, the Moon, and tree trunks (cylinders). Ovals and ellipses are found also, like giant eggs.

Faery earth building materials are usually wood, stone, and mud. The mud is best applied as a mortar or stucco clay plaster. Wooden branches, sticks, rope, and décor are gathered from bushes, trees, vines, river reeds, meadow thatch, and wild flowers. Rock is often quarried or mined by dwarves or gnomes, and used to with or without wood or mud. Rock can hold wood, or be held by wood. These materials were used independently, or in any combination.

Faery style: ‘Round Rock, Round Mound, & Bound Bough’

Round – sun, moon, tree trunks, eggs

Wood – bushes, trees, reeds, vines, flowers

Stone – shale, lime-stone, and calcium-quartz

Soil – mud, clay, mound, berm, silt-gravel, sand

Faeries can build and live in more human types of buildings, and will still make their mark on them. Rectangular masonry, timber-frame, and half-timber structures may be modified to distinguish them physically as ‘fae’. One way is to add ‘eyes’.

Faery gypsies, pioneers, and scouts often craft make-shift structures that look like fallen branches or vine covered bushes. Moss is a very earthy plant, and lichen is an algae fungus; both of which are used along with ferns commonly on faerie mounds or berms.

Smaller faerie homes were often just hidden from sight; in trees, mounds, or under cliff rocks called mini-bluffs.

*

LH 38

teewam_08

17

Tornado Architecture

Posted in Alternative Architecture, Organic Architecture, Sustainability with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2013 by Drogo

BUILD UNDERGROUND!!!

As an architect, this has been my consistent advice for all people living within tornado areas. Sure underground construction costs a few thousand more than most crappy track houses, but it is worth it when you know that having a normal house makes you an easy target for the common natural disasters that occur in that area. Government (State or Federal) should get with it, and supply financial incentives to get most homes underground now! There is no reason to wait. If you want to keep your house and most things in your house safe, you need an underground house; not just a separate storm shelter or basement.

I would never live in an area that has tornadoes without living in an underground house, if I had any money or respect for life at all.

– Drogo Empedocles

pred_entry

Tofu Lizard Memoir 04

Posted in Fictional Stories, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 22, 2012 by Drogo

SCOD Journal of Tofu Lizard Entry  04

Walking along the Trail, I crossed the mountain known as Loudoun Heights and came to the Tri-State gas station. Across the highway traffic-light intersection there was an arch made of wood, metal, and stone. I remembered seeing a photo of it on the SCOD website; and as I approached I saw the letters embedded in the arch: S-C-O-D. This was it! This was the place! I walked through the gate and up the gravel road that was shaded by trees. A small stream ran along below on one side of the road. I passed several driveways for small woodland dwellings. At the crest of the hill I walked beside a farm field. The sun shone down on the freshly tilled soil. Along the perimeter of the field was a ring of green growth, and several dwellings connected by a fence. I remember learning from the website about how the fence and houses enclosed, protected, and tended the field. Each of the field houses and forest houses were unique in design. Each structure utilized the elements of nature in their own ways.

I waved to some people in the field, and they waved back, although they were busy in conversation. I knew I should check in at the main building, so I kept on the road. Soon I came upon a garden glen of ruins. It was a memory garden to a long gone building that had been destroyed in a fire, with tall chimneys. Now a blacksmith shop skirted one of the chimneys, and flowing gardens made terraces of the hulking foundation. I could have stayed there all day just meditating, but I pressed onward.

Finally I reached the Medieval Tavern. Otherwise known as “The Pipedream Pub”, it was the primary building. The Pub acted as town hall, barracks, bed & breakfast, inn, tavern, hotel, gift shop, stage, dance hall, bar, restaurant, residence, private club, gallery, library, tourist attraction, and visitor center. There were a few figures hanging out in the porch area, as I approached. One of them was a farmer, one was a biker, and one was in period garb.

*  [continued in Entry 5]

SCOD Mission Statement “Seek”

Posted in SCOD Pipedream Pub with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 30, 2009 by Drogo

Seek

We seek others of like mind, spirit, and soul.

We seek kinship of the heart, and loyalty in friendship.

We seek Truth, in all its forms.

We seek Land, to build upon.

We seek to unite other communities, in common communication.

We seek to untie ourselves from unwanted mundane bonds.

We seek a Medieval Tavern to gather locals and visitors alike.

We seek dwellings to be individuals, personally designed.

We seek fields to grow our own food, and have open space.

We seek groves of trees, to selectively use for harvest of food, shelter, and fire. Under their giant branches we gain wisdom from their shade.

So Mote it Be.

*

SCOD is like Paganism in its mission. In Paganism there is no single leader, scripture or religious philosophy. Most Pagans, however, believe in the divine character of the natural world and Paganism is often described as an “Earth religion”.