Archive for economics

The Decline of American White Men

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization, Economics, jobs, Medical, Military, news, relationships, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 5, 2019 by Drogo

Post-Modern White Male Destruction: Causes of Our Resentment, Anger, & Despair

American white men are self-destructing more than ever before since WW2 due to a return to Great Depression economic poverty for the masses, and most of our wealth going to the rich elites. We comprise a large percentage of the US population, but despite not being a minority, we are increasingly killing ourselves and others in a desperate struggle to maintain our ‘dominant legacy’ (social profile expectations based on cultural history). If you know white men who are acting more desperate, hooked on hard meth or heroin, and more masochist and sadistic please know it is not just you, it is part of a systemic problem that has to do with self worth decline compared to the last generation. Decreasing wealth for white men, compounded by mortgage and student debt which decimated the middle-class after years of subjugation working for free to fund institutions, we find ourselves less likely to support ourselves, and certainly not mates or family dependents. These problems of expectation affect our honor, and we hate ourselves and want to blame other poor people within shooting range. Before debating this issue, it is important to study the statistics of sustainability.

More people die from poverty than terrorism. According to TED speaker Dan Gilbert, more people die from poverty than if a terrorist detonated a nuke; statistically ‘Why We Make Bad Decisions‘.  Also ‘Poverty isn’t a lack of character; it’s a lack of cash‘ according to Rutger Bregman, and other humanists.  [ Poverty stats ]

Mass incarceration does not help. Even if blacks are proportionately in prison more, we have more of our whole population in jail than any other country. Between 1980 and 2015, the number of people incarcerated in America increased from roughly 500,000 to over 2 million. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that 35% of state prisoners are white, 38% are black, and 21% are Hispanic. Our national population of poverty is enforced with taxes that pay for the prisons, police, and military. [ Stats of mass incarceration: NAACP ‘Criminal Justice Facts‘;  Sentencing Project;  USA has the largest ‘Prison Population‘ in the World (click on the chart to sort = 2,121,600) ]

Yes meth and heroin are largely a white people problem. ‘Christian White Men’ are more likely to use those hard drugs in poverty today. [ Stats for drug addiction: AAC; MH Race Stats for Drug Addiction; NIH ‘Drug Treatment Facts‘; NCBI Race & Gender Studies

Our average life span has been reduced according to critical studies. Men already died younger on average than women, but now whites in general are living shorter lives, despite medical advances. [ NPR ‘Deaths of Despair’ ]

Poverty causes many to join the Military, where we still feel suicidal despite guaranteed pay and benefits; because the ‘War On Terror’ is perpetual and demoralizing (see MIC). Never forget all the soldier suicides during the endless war on terror. Since 2001 apx 22 die a day (144,000+) RIP. Women are more likely to report mental fatigue, so that needs to be accounted for in the raw data; because men are more likely to act out rather than report themselves for problems (‘macho pride’ social stereo-type issue). [ Veteran Suicides by State ‘Once A Soldier’; Veteran Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-8255; ‘Playing with War Wisdom‘ ]

Yes Trump is a symptom of our problem.  [ ‘REAL Reasons For Trump’s Impeachment‘ Redacted Tonight; Trump is a con-artist scamming bigoted rapist Chump ]

Yes mass shootings are symptoms of our problems. ‘Christian White Men’ are terrorists more often than Muslims or anyone else in America. [ Statistics of Mass Shootings by Race ]

Access to guns and explosives for psychotic men in every state, with no substantial health care plan for mental illness does not help.  [ Gun & Explosive stats – ATF ]

Less jobs paying a living wage, relative to the cost of living, is at the heart of our problem [Michael Moore’s films; Noam Chomsky’s ‘Requiem for the American Dream‘]. Companies prefer to use migrant workers who work for less (and automation), rather than pay middle-class wages. Capitalist corporations corrupt government against the good of the people (aka general population). Despite all these problems with our system, there is some hope for us to increase our standards of living proposed by the Next System Project (NSP), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (AOC), and Bernie Sanders with the Green New Deal.  [ NSP Democratic Investment Bank; AOC GND; Sanders’ GND ]

Speak out about the larger problems, and surprise neo-fascist racists by explaining why minorities are not to blame for big problems that affect the majority of the population (which includes minorities). Surprise! Our economic problems are not solved by race wars, although the rich elites who own corporations are fine with neo-fascists like Trump because race wars benefit them. Be smart, don’t blame race for a plutocratic system that keeps us all down. We all benefit when we come together and cooperate to make change as ‘We The People’!

[ AUDIO Recording of this essay ]

 

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GREEN NEW DEAL – Our Revolution 2019

Posted in Climate Change, Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Economics, Environmentalism, Ethics & Morals, Legal / Laws, news, Organic Development, Politics, Sustainability, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 30, 2019 by Drogo

SCOD Transcript from the Sanders for President 2020 Website

The Green New Deal (GND) concept is public domain and so there are various versions (AOC, Sanders, SCOD) as thesis theories that propose comprehensive plans. This SCOD version is published as part of the Sanders’ ‘Our Revolution’ (evolved from Occupy) movement. Shout out to Standing Rock! [Listen to the Audio Recording of the GND read by Drogo Empedocles]

 

Statement Introduction and Assumptions:

The climate crisis is the single greatest challenge facing our country, The United States of America (USA); and also our single greatest opportunity to build a more sustainable egalitarian future in America, but we must act immediately. Climate change is a global emergency. The Amazon rainforest is burning, and Greenland’s ice shelf is melting. People across the world are already experiencing the deadly consequences of climate change; as extreme weather events like heat waves, wildfires, droughts, floods, and hurricanes have disturbed or destroyed millions of lives in communities, ecosystems, and economies. Poor lower working class and homeless people have borne this burden; many of them were formerly members of the devastated middle class who lost their jobs, families, homes, and property during the Great Recession. The scientific community tells us we have about a decade to transform our energy system away from fossil fuels, towards greater energy efficiency and sustainable renewable energy. We are going to make this planet great again, and healthy and habitable for us, our children, grandchildren, and future generations. Rising temperatures and extreme weather compounded by unrestrained crony corporate political power at the highest levels in government have created health and financial emergencies, causing many Americans to be disabled or commit suicide (see military statistics for soldier suicides and lethal drug epidemics). We must guarantee health care, housing, and a good-paying job to every American, especially to those who have been historically excluded from economic security (aka the basics of modern survival).

The scope of the challenge ahead shares similarities with the crisis faced by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) in the 1940s. FDR’s ‘New Deal’ was successful at creating a larger middle class by improving the livelihoods of lower class workers. Battling World War 2 on two fronts, from East to West, the United States came together within 3 years and restructured the entire economy in order to win the war and defeat fascism (corporate government). As president, Bernie Sanders will boldly direct our nationalist patriotic power to embrace the moral imperative of addressing environmental terrorism threats. Environmental threats affect us more than other forms of terrorism due to corporations that create climate change pollution, poison natural resources, and weaponize racism (Coal Mine Wars). Over-population combined with reduction of resources and wealth for the majority of the population has led to support for hateful mass murder (public shootings). Our environment is not just natural, but also social, cultural, economic, and political (artificial). Those artificial aspects of our environment are dependent on people, so we must mobilize millions of people across the country in support of the Green New Deal (The GND depends on us). From the Oval Office to the streets, Bernie will help generate cooperative ‘Our Revolution’ spirit for changing our system (We The People). We can gather sustainable will power together for energy and transportation technology, and economic progress. Bernie Sanders has the courage, the vision, and the record to face down the greed of fossil fuel executives, and the millionaire and billionaire upper classes who have sabotaged environmental action. While being a millionaire now, President Bernie will accept his share of national responsibility (wealth taxes), and welcome the hatred of those among his upper class who refuse to sacrifice to solve crises they helped create. Bernie will lead our country in this Green New Deal movement, and bring the world together to defeat the existing threats of climate change and corporate control. Please join the GND movement with us!

President, Bernie Sanders Will Avert Climate Catastrophe and Create 20 Million Jobs

Main Proposal Plan:

As president, Bernie Sanders will launch the decade of the Green New Deal, a ten-year, nationwide mobilization centered around justice and equity during which climate change will be factored into virtually every area of policy, from immigration to trade to foreign policy and beyond. This plan outlines some of the most significant goals we have set and steps we will take during this mobilization, including (SCOD consolidated bullet points):

  1. Create 100% Renewable Energy – by expanding alternative sources for electricity and transportation by no later than 2030 and complete decarbonization by 2050; consistent with the United Nations (UN) Panel on Climate Change goals; by expanding the existing federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMA) to build new solar, wind, water, and geothermal energy infra-structure.
  1. Create 20 million new green jobs needed to solve the climate crisis. These jobs will be good paying, union jobs with strong benefits and safety standards in steel and auto manufacturing, construction, energy efficiency retrofitting, coding and server farms, and renewable power plants. We will also create millions of jobs in sustainable agriculture, engineering, a reimagined and expanded Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC), fully fund the Land and Water Conservation Corps, and preserve our public lands.
  1. Declare National Emergency for Transition – federal spending to be transferred from creating pollution, to ending pollution. Climate Change and the Great Recession are National Emergencies, so we will invest $16.3 trillion for public mobilization of resources to include more minority communities and democracy in the work-place.
  1. Transition workers from fossil fuels to renewable energy. Workers often are neglected by corporations and politicians. We will guarantee five years of a worker’s current salary, housing assistance, job training, health care, pension support, and priority job placement for any displaced worker, as well as early retirement support for those who need it.
  1. Save families money – weatherizing homes, lowering energy bills, building better public transportation, providing grants and trade-in programs for families and small businesses to purchase high-efficiency electric vehicles, and rebuilding our inefficient and crumbling infrastructure, including deploying universal, affordable high-speed internet.
  1. Supporting small family farms – by investing in ecologically regenerative and sustainable agriculture. This plan will transform our agricultural system to fight climate change with agro-ecology, provide perma-culture local foods, and break the corporate stranglehold on farmers and ranchers. [see Revitalizing Rural America plan (RRA)]
  1. Justice for frontline communities – special help for under-resourced groups, communities of color, Native Americans, people with disabilities, children and the elderly through a $40 billion Climate Justice Resiliency Fund (CJRF); providing those border or fence-line communities a just transition including real jobs, resilient infrastructure, economic development.
  1. Reduce global emissions throughout the world – by providing $200 billion to the Green Climate Fund (GCF), rejoining the Paris Agreement, and reasserting US international leadership in the global fight against climate change.
  1. US emission reductions – The United States has for over a century spewed carbon pollution emissions into the atmosphere in order to gain economic standing in the world. Therefore, we have an outsized obligation to help less industrialized nations meet their targets while improving quality of life. We will reduce domestic emissions by at least 71 percent by 2030 and reduce emissions among less industrialized nations by 36 percent by 2030; the total equivalent of reducing our domestic emissions by 161%.
  1. Massive investments in research and development. We will invest in public research to drastically reduce the cost of energy storage, electric vehicles, and make our plastic more sustainable through advanced chemistry. [see free Community College plan]
  1. This GND plan pays for itself over 15 years. – by Making the fossil fuel industry pay for their pollution, through litigation, fees, and taxes, and eliminating federal fossil fuel subsidies; by Generating revenue from the wholesale of energy produced by the regional Power Marketing Authorities. Revenues will be collected from 2023-2035, and after 2035 electricity will be virtually free, aside from operations and maintenance costs.; by Scaling back military spending on maintaining global oil dependence.; by Collecting new income tax revenue from the 20 million new jobs created by the plan.; by Reduced need for federal and state safety net spending due to the creation of millions of good-paying, unionized jobs – Making the wealthy and large corporations pay their fair share. The cost of inaction is unacceptable. Economists estimate that if we do not take action, we will lose $34.5 trillion in economic activity by the end of the century. And the benefits are enormous:  by taking bold and decisive action, we will save $2.9 trillion over 10 years, $21 trillion over 30 years, and $70.4 trillion over 80 years. Also the ecological value of preserving living green resources should be calculated into our current economy.
  1. Environmental Economy vs Corporate Greed – We cannot accomplish any of these goals without taking on the fossil fuel billionaires whose greed lies at the very heart of the climate crisis. These executives have spent hundreds of millions of dollars protecting their profits at the expense of our future, and they will do whatever it takes to squeeze every last penny out of the Earth. Bernie promises to go further than any other presidential candidate in history to end the fossil fuel industry’s greed, including by making the industry pay for its pollution and prosecuting it for the damage it has caused. Most importantly, we must build an unprecedented grassroots movement that is powerful enough to take them on, and win. Young people, advocates, tribes, cities and states all over this country have already begun this important work, and we will continue to follow their lead. Regional Economic Development – Provide targeted regional economic development. Communities especially in need of assistance during our transition to a clean energy economy will be eligible for an additional funding for economic development investments through regional commissions and authorities. Our federal regional commissions make targeted economic development investments in rural America. These commissions have funded projects that enhance workforce competitiveness, build and repair infrastructure, and increase community capacity like broadband projects, clean drinking water, organic farming, and energy efficiency.

Funding will be distributed Regionally as follows:

  • $2.53 billion for the Appalachian Regional Commission
  • $506.4 million for the Delta Regional Authority
  • $304 million for the Denali Commission
  • $405 million for the Northern Border Regional Commission
  • $94 million for the Southeast Crescent Regional Commission 
  • $2.02 billion for Economic Development Assistance Programs
  • Infrastructure investments for impacted communities. We will provide $130 billion for counties impacted by climate change with funding for water, broadband, and electric grid infrastructure investments.
  • Connect consumers with local farms and healthy foods. Establish a victory lawns and gardens initiative through a $36 billion investment to help urban, rural, and suburban Americans transform their lawns into food-producing or reforested spaces that sequester carbon and save water. Lawns account for 40 million acres in America, and we spend tens of billions of dollars each year taking care of them each year. Let’s reinvest that money in climate smart practices that encourage everyone to be a part of the solution.
  • Invest $14.7 billion in cooperatively owned grocery stores. Local groceries and co-ops are more likely to buy local products, which will help grow markets for farmers to sell their goods. We will also use these funds to bring grocery stores to food deserts ensuring all people have access to healthy, local food. 
  • Incentivize schools to procure locally produced foods. Institutional purchasing can be a huge boost to local producers and build local farm economies. We will give a meal incentive for schools that acquire at least 30 percent of their food from local sources. Invest $31 billion in local food processing, including slaughter and dairy processing. Rampant consolidation in processing has led to a lack of facilities for small-scale, local producers. Investing in local facilities will help smaller producers to compete with the Tyson Foods of the world. Allow meat slaughtered at state inspected facilities to be sold across state lines, to compete with imported meat.

 

* END SCOD Summary of the GND *

Why Would an Artist Architect write a book on Economics & Politics??

Posted in Alternative Architecture, Economics, Environmentalism, Organic Development, Philosophy, Politics, Sustainability, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on May 15, 2017 by Drogo

Wealth inequality is on the rise.

What does that mean for regular people?

Rising wealth inequality nationally means the rich are getting richer, more drastically than before; and the poor are getting poorer, which means they will soon have the rights of displaced Native Americans from 100 years ago. Imagine how that might affect minorities like many blacks and natives who already have the poverty of third-world countries, but are required to pay the fees of first-world plutocrats and corporate cronies?

Most of us are still feeling the Great Recession in our daily lives. The national economic ‘growth’ data that popular economists use, shows that after the corporate bail-outs sectors of our economy grew. Can you guess what percentage of the population benefited from that growth? About 1%.

Many of us middle-class people are losing our wealth when we try to sell our homes because of banker-real-estate fraud on the buyer’s behalf, devaluing old homes in areas of slow growth and using tax money to build new developments which makes a few rich while we get poorer without as many jobs, because money has been drained from the middle to go to the top.

I remember when I first noticed corporate take-over locally in the 1990’s when Walmarts began ‘out-competing’ all the mom-and-pop small family owned stores, and almost monopolized the market even for large franchise chains. Cable-companies made fortunes stringing wires around the country, into rural areas, competing with ‘WV state-flowers’ and antenna TV. Larger companies replaced smaller ones, every-where.

It is time to change the system, but it is not all or nothing. There are elements of alternative systems every-where in history, and around us in America today. If we do not have a right to live, our leaders do not have a right to rule, because they enforce the laws that make us unable to provide for ourselves, laws which we need to take responsibility to change.

Power for the people, and by the people is a constant struggle. ‘Power to the people’! We have to take the power back, from the plutocrats. Economics and politics are combined in America as a corrupt form of crony ‘State Capitalism’. No conspiracy or theory is needed to explain the reality of how corporations function, it is notoriously blatant and commonly accepted as ‘just the way things are’; so without defining every popular economic term that Madoff and Greenspan advocated, I will try to high-light the problems that affect most of us and propose solutions.

“People Power!!!” – AMM (Appalachian Mountain Militia)

I do not expect people to take my word as total truth. I want average people to get interested in how our system works, by helping them to feel that they can make a difference simply by beginning to question the establishment in intelligent ways. I am not a professional economist, I am studying finance as a hobby. For this book I am able to put forth theories by other economists, scientists, and philosophers; by rewording or quoting them. There are millions of people that disagree with my opinions, and I will not include all the information that a basic or advanced economic book would; but I will do my best to interpret and phrase jargon with references as best I can.

I designed and published SCOD Thesis in 1999 to address alternative ways to live. I was mocked by some students and professors for wanting to build a ‘commune’. It was considered absurd to be interested in village design that was not able to be financed by rich clients or the government, for ‘profit’.

I accepted the responsibility that I was a radical rebel, and system out-cast in college when I began to learn more about adult subjects, and got a clearer impression how the business world worked. My experience as a college graduate trying to ‘earn a living’ by selling myself to anyone willing to pay me, was even more discouraging and depressing.

As a drafting assistant, design partner, professor of architecture, and architectural adviser I was so in debt that any money I made had to go directly to pay debt bills, and did not allow me to save for the basics of middle-class property and personal benefit expectations that were promised to come to everyone that played by the rules of the system (higher education = more income). I found those platitudes to be hollow, even for many like me who wanted to find a life-long career within ‘good’ firms. Well it was clear the world for practicing architects was changing from what it had been. I did work with my father for years, and as partners we completed many designs and built many projects; however we made very little profit.

My father and I were successful designers, but that success did not transfer financially. Part of the reason capitalism did not work for us, was that many clients were poor, and even the rich wanted to save money. My father out of the kindness of his heart and joy to serve others, and enthusiasm for his craft, would charge fees that may have gone further during the 1970s. Combine low pay with the rise in cost of living, inflation, and this is why my mother had to support our family by working commercial retail at Walmart and teaching at schools; both jobs luckily she enjoyed as best she could. I worked many other jobs besides architecture, sometimes 5 jobs a month, and always actively found back-up jobs and projects that kept me busy. Despite only having one family car and very few luxuries for middle-class, we saw our wealth diminish no matter how hard we worked, and no matter how many clients we had.

I lived within my means, on the budget of a lower-class individual, while striving to serve the public as a middle-class citizen educated by ‘higher institutions of education’. I did not ‘drop-out’ of the system, the system was not interested in using me for the purpose that my education, psychology, and skill-set allowed. I still continue to live in this way, which I feel is the best I can do with what I have available to me.

I do not say these things to complain that my family suffered more than lower-class people, or disabled people (who can easily be disenfranchised by society and the system). I am not comparing how we lived to how other classes live, the point of being honest about my middle-class family experience is to show why I believe that alternative economic systems are important. I have always been interested in the definition of economics, and silly questions like “why do we say ‘trade & barter’ if those terms are synonyms?”. My favorite question as a child was “what makes a unit of something worth anything?”; or more humorously “can we just start using bottle caps or shells as money?”. I still think those types of questions are good.

Professionals whose public speeches, books, and conversations I have studied include Dr. Dean Baker, Prof. Noam Chomsky, Prof. Mark Blyth, Prof. Michael Hudson, politicians Bernie Sanders, Jill Stein, Jeremy Corbyn, and many others.

Regardless I think it is always good to hear that other people suffer from a type of economic exchange we could call the ‘oops I should have asked for more” syndrome. So I will try to include a few of those stories too for you. Enjoy the most boring theories you never thought might affect you, and keep on keepin’ on.

If I understand some economists correctly, they are saying we are living in a period like the 1920s when all growth was in the stock market; it was considered ‘capital gain’ but was really ‘striping assets’; which resulted in the Stock Market Crash and Great Depression. No pressure people.

Jeremy Corbyn in the Labor (Labour) Party in England, makes Bernie Sanders look like a centrist about public policies.

“For the many, not the few.” – Corbyn Labour party platform

“Our challenge to a rigged system, is bound to meet hostility. Change always involves taking on vested interests. The stakes are very high.” – Jeremy Corbyn, British Labour Party 2017

Great experimentation with individual and social action must take place now! I have been writing and publishing essays on Teaching, Colleges, Jobs, and systemic economic problems and solutions. In 2017 I am producing a series of recordings and essays on ‘SCOD Economics’. This Economic series includes interviews and biographies across disciplines, and intends to address both present injustices and futurist hopes.

We will discuss injustice within our educational and political system, that adversely affects people with alternative thoughts or theories that are not accepted by the conventional establishment corporate ideology frame-work that contains and controls most of the World. We are given their propaganda that “we can all have any job we want, so long as we try hard and get good grades”. Our reality based on my experience is more like “most of us can have at least a minimum-wage job with few benefits, for a limited amount of time, without job security, pathetic interest for savings accounts, the job we find may be against our own interests, and those who cannot get good grades or are bad at following orders get nothing and will probably end up in jail or homeless”. Despite these problems which I have personally witnessed and experienced, the final goal of the series is to plan for a better more sustainable tomorrow for future generations; even if the series conclusions are largely ignored within our life-times. Historic record has some worth.

From the book – SCOD Economics: Alternative Economic Theories

Economics affects everyone, even those that do not want to be concerned with money or finances. This book is a summary of alternative economic commentaries that emphasize democratic ethics. The Sustainable Cooperative for Organic Development believes in valuing human lives as responsible environmental stewards for our biosphere called Earth, and seeks ways to allow for biodiversity in civilization as well as the ecosystem. We believe in less monopolies, less corporate crony politics, less corruption in government, and more ways to support various ways of life and provide future generations with the ability to provide for themselves. Please let’s work together to leave something for the children that is worth inheriting.

 – Drogo Empedocles

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SCOD Economic Theory Series

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Economics, Multimedia Communication, Organic Development, Philosophy, Politics, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 3, 2017 by Drogo

Essays on Educational, Employment, and Systemic Economic Problems and Solutions

by Drogo Empedocles; May 2017

In 2017 I am producing a series of recordings and essays on ‘SCOD Economics’. This Economic series includes interviews and biographies across disciplines, and intends to address both present injustices and futurist hopes. We will discuss injustice within our educational and political system, that adversely affects people with alternative thoughts or theories that are not accepted by the conventional establishment corporate ideology frame-work that contains and controls most of the World. We are given their propaganda that “we can all have any job we want, so long as we try hard and get good grades”. Our reality based on my experience is more like “most of us can have at least a minimum-wage job with few benefits, for a limited amount of time, without job security, pathetic interest for savings accounts, the job we find may be against our own interests, and those who cannot get good grades or are bad at following orders get nothing and will probably end up in jail or homeless”. Despite these problems which I have personally witnessed and experienced, the final goal of the series is to plan for a better more sustainable tomorrow for future generations; even if the series conclusions are largely ignored within our life-times.

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SCOD Economic Permaculture & Futurist Interviews:

Tom the Data Scientist, Libertarian

Cheri M. the Permaculturalist

Beamer the Scientist, Liberal

Aeyla the Care Giver, Independent

Scorpion the Homeless, Independent

Drogo the Architect, Green

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SCOD Economic Commentaries:

My Favorite Job Was Teaching

How Crony-Capitalism Affects Education

Homeless Ways of Life

Public Art and Street Teaching

Alternative Economic Education

Graduate School Politics in Colleges & University

Permaculture in Economics, Business, & Politics

Quest For Consciousness

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References:

Economics Professor Mark Blyth

Economics Professor Wolff

MIT Professor Noam Chomsky

(Page Under Construction – links and more will be added soon)

Quest for Consciousness

Posted in Economics, Politics, Science & Math, Spiritual, Sustainability, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 30, 2017 by Drogo

Over the years I have toured many college campuses and made appointments to meet with staff members in their architecture departments. As friendly as some of the professors may have been, they told me candidly there were no job opportunities for me as part of their faculty, and of course none of them were paid to help me, and therefore they did not. I did lecture them on SCOD thesis, and they verified that college politics was not in my favor; despite ‘sustainability’ being a popular theory.

While exploring the Maryland University campus again in 2017 for open-house Maryland Day, among my various conversations, I did have a fortunate discussion with quantum physics graduate students and a business school professor, outside of the Science Department. We were talking about particle-wave theory, the split-test experiment, and the question of what observer consciousness, or whether they turned the lights on or off had to do with it.

I congratulated the business professor for being concerned about whether science could account for consciousness; as we have a cross-disciplinary problem of not being able to quantitatively value life-forms and the Eco-system in direct ways that protect our existence from predatory capitalism. He recognized that this problem did indeed exist, and that he “only went into business to make money”, but he was very concerned about getting the scientific establishment to acknowledge that consciousness exists. I defended the students who had volunteered to answer public questions, by telling the business professor that he was “pushing the limits of their knowledge, because science is about conducting quantitative verifiable experiments; and I wish that spirit had a residue that we could measure, but there does not appear to be much evidence that conscious exists apart from biology.”

Our two quests are linked, because monetary currency is mutually agreed upon around the globe, but life and environmental science are often ignored for profits that do not take their worth into account as variables that have economic value. If consciousness cannot be verified, given quantitative worth, and supported in monetary terms, then how can we ever develop Economic Consciousness for Life-forms? Perhaps we can begin with Bio-diversity preservation theories that do not depend on ‘consciousness’. Climate Science is getting ignored currently also, so perhaps corrupt politics or predatory instincts are to blame. On a positive note, I went to the Art Department and explained this problem during another conversation about the value of art and artist income.

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American Dream Fallout

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization, Economics, POB Audio, Politics, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 11, 2016 by Drogo

In the Wake of the Great Recession the American Dream Dies

“The American Dream is a crucial thread in this country’s tapestry, woven through politics, music and culture. Though the phrase has different meanings to different people, it suggests an underlying belief that hard work pays off and that the next generation will have a better life than the previous generation. But three years after the worst recession in almost a century, the American Dream now feels in jeopardy to many…” “Economic statistics validate those feelings. According to the Census Bureau, an average man working full time made 10 percent less money last year than he did a decade ago.” [Read full story at NPR – American Dream Faces Harsh New Reality]

“New economic research shows Americans are no longer as likely to make more than their parents did at the same age…The American dream is harder to attain than it used to be. People may have felt that for a long time. Now there’s a body of research to back that up. One definition of the American dream is that your children will make more money than you did. Now economists have charted the percentage of people who make more than their parents did at the same age, and the picture is striking…” (adjusted for inflation) If you were born in 1940, you had a 92% chance that you would make more money than your parents did, because of national economic growth. For those born in 1980 it has fallen to 50%. Besides changes in educational and industrial labor, the main economic reason most people are not out-earning their parents is that corporate productivity gains go disproportionately to the few people at the top. Income inequality between the poor and the rich is the main problem. [Read full story at NPR – Economists Chart ‘Index Of The American Dream‘]

“Income Inequality Impairs The American Dream of Upward Mobility.” [Read and Listen to the full story at NPR – Debate: Does Income Inequality Impair The American Dream?]

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Like a phoenix we can rise from the ashes and co-create a new American Dream!

 

95 Million Americans Not Employed

Posted in jobs, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2016 by Drogo

95,055,000 Americans have no employer-job income in 2016!

For some reason, the public media ‘Unemployment Reports’ from the US Department of Labor are not listing the largest and most important number. According to their own data charts (which do not copy well as a direct link for specific info, perhaps on purpose) the Bureau of Labor Statistics ‘Household Data’ Table A-1; in November 2016 there were over 95 Million Americans ‘not employed’ total. To clarify, over 95,000,000 adults have no ‘outside-the-family-home’ income (using the ‘not in the labor force’ chart). Many adult workers have no formal income in America. Over 38 million men and almost 57 million women, of those jobless are adults over the age of 16 (using the seasonally adjusted charts).

Here is an article link that explains the ‘Real Unemployment Rate‘.

The total population of the USA is 324,954,000. The US civilian population of adult citizens between the ages of 15-65 is apx. 206,189,000 (male + female) [Wikipedia]; of those 152 million are ’employed’ (includes over 7 million unemployed), and 95 million are not included. About 152 million employees are having to support 95 million other adults of all ages AND all the 62 million children. Although we have men and women working formal or informal paying or volunteer jobs, the ratio of income is perhaps about the same as before Equal Rights (152/157). Worse yet the economy shows no signs of improving, and based on the facts appears to be getting worse every year (accounting for inflation ratios).

There is a pattern trend in relation to the number of years (from 1975-2016) and the unemployed numbers (58 million to 95 million). In 1975 the total ‘jobless population’ was 58,627,000 (over 16 years of age). So since 1975 the ratio of population to non-employed has at least doubled. Our total population has grown in that time (1975-2016) only a little over 100 million more; therefore the disproportionate numbers means that although the total population only grew by 1/3, the jobless population grew by 1/2. ‘Fact-checkers’ claim numbers not included (people in school or elderly over 65) reduce 95 million to 20 million, but I am not convinced and have not yet verified their numbers [Politifact]. I believe counting students over 16 as potential PAID labor force is fair (as they should not be slaves), so if we subtract 40 million elders (population over 65 not verified) that still leaves 55 million adults with no official income that should be getting a living wage if we believe that people have a right to life.

This data makes a parabola chart showing perpetual rapid job loss by the millions within decades. In one generation the masses could all be slaves to corporate plutocracy, with no ability to vote on anything except American Idol, will own less and less property, and will become more impoverished with each generation. One conclusion could be that we are indeed long overdue for major reform, we have been misled by our leaders, and real revolution is needed. The Green Party, SCOD, and others are by necessity already exploring alternative grass-roots economies. We could also break up the Federal government into smaller sections of states (by time-zones), each with democratic directly elected presidential councils; but most agree we should make more democratic changes however we can. The current corporate system trend resembles a Plutocracy that keeps the masses enslaved only to benefit the wealthy elites. If we all will it to change, we can democratize corporations from within by controlling them as the ‘body mass’.

jobless-chart-copy