Archive for ecovillage

WEME Village

Posted in Cartoon Comics, ecovillages, Fictional Characters, Homesteading, Uncategorized with tags , , , on February 17, 2017 by Drogo

SCOD Ecovillage Short Story

The woman and man planned and ran their own dream village of fwends.

Twin spirit kindred flames, like mirror twinsies; except one was more fire and one was more water, and both were rooted in earth and speaking signs in aether air.

He would say “isnt it so sister?”, and she would say “yes brother, it is so.” and then she would say “isnt it so brother?” and he would say “yes sister, it is so, and you are also correct about that.” and they would wind the gears, and dust the chairs, and sweep the floors and patch the roofs, and mend the windows, polish the wood, and explore the woods. They sing French songs together that she taught him. They kiss and hugs like good brothers and sisters do, in honor of Hermes and Hathor; and they invite all to do the same, if they do choose.

to be continued….

elf-village-color-5

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SUNSHIRE – SCOD Ecovillage Game

Posted in ecovillages, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on December 5, 2015 by Drogo

Cooperative Communal Winning!!!

Goal: Win by working together to build and maintain a thriving eco-village. Make the village within 12 years (turns), and keep it for another 12. Survive 24 years of life-changing events and start a legacy of stewardship for the Earth!

Sunshire Game Board

Start: Pick a color building to start with. Blue Long-house; Red Brick-house, Black Herb-House. Blue has 1 savings & 3 income, Red has 3 savings & 2 income, Black has 3 savings & 1 income to start with.

Play: The game is played by keeping a ‘character record sheet’, rolling 2 (6-sided) die each turn, reading the results on the ‘result table’ aloud, and following what it says. Mark each turn on the ‘character record sheet’ to keep track of how many turns have been taken. The result roll will determine your actions each turn. IMPORTANT: At any time any player can give any other player savings from their account, or make any transaction that is mutually agreed upon; this allows cooperation by those with excess savings to alleviate the suffering of others. Trade, Gifts, or Building Dwellings can take place once per turn.

Character Record Sheet: Must be maintained each turn.

Player name & Start color:

Turns taken (game ends in 24):

Savings (start color #):

Income-bill Ratio (start color #):

Dwellings (as you place them):

Income-bill Ratio = Net Profit added each turn to your savings (gross-bills)

Savings = monetary or resource amount you have in storage reserves

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Result Table (this takes the place of using cards)

mark a turn after each roll, and add your income/bill ratio rate to your savings each turn.

2 = Share a Harvest [+1 savings, and +1 savings also given to a friend]

3 = Harvest natural resources [+2 income, +1 savings]

4 = Discount Dwelling using all free materials [-3 savings, place any dwelling]

5 = Commute to Volunteer Job [-1 savings, -1 income]

6 = Lucky Harvest [+3  savings, and +1 income]

7 = Renovate property for maintenance [-3 savings]

8 = Commute to Job [-2 savings, +3 income]

9 = Pay medical Bills [-5 savings]

10 = Guests!!! Pay extra special Bills [-3 savings]

11 = DAMAGE on your property!!! [lose all income for this turn, & -5 savings]

12 = Long-house has an event that raises +5 in total savings (share).

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Place a Dwelling: when the result table tells you to ‘place a dwelling’, pick from the dwelling icons and place it on a yellow circle on the map. Also mark on your character sheet that you have a dwelling and how much resources or bills it adds to your sheet.

7 Dwellings to Build & Rent: A-Frame, Tree-Pole, Dome-Shingle, Glass-Metal, Yurt-Teepee, Adobe-Cob, Under-Earth

Yurt-Teepee House = canvas tents and hides on frames [-4 savings, +1 rent income]

Adobe-Cob House = clay brick & stucco straw-bale [-5 savings, +2 rent income]

Under-Earth House = hill-side walls & sod roof [-6 savings, +2 rent income]

A-Frame House = cedar gable log-cabin [-7 savings, +3 income]

Tree-Pole House = up in trees on stilts and wedge beams [-8 savings, +3 rent income]

Dome-Shingle House = below the trees with decks [-9 savings, +4 rent income]

Glass-Metal House = geodesic, clear and colored glass [-10 savings, +5 rent income]

7 dwellings

  • That’s it!

List of Alternative Intentional Communities

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 1, 2011 by Drogo

List of Alternative Intentional Communities

Other Websites Listing Alternative Intentional Communities:

Ecotopia (not to be confused with the Book or the Game) EcoSystems Inc. based in California

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Eco-Villages

* Natural Bridges in Santa Cruz, CA

* Baggins End Pod Village UC Davis, CA 1972

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* Loudoun County, VA

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(this page is under construction)

Garden Cities by Ebenezer Howard

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Book Reports, Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Critical Commentary of Civilization, ecovillages, Sustainability with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 1, 2011 by Drogo

From the book Garden Cities of To-morrow by Ebenezer Howard 1898, 1902

Ebenezer Howard was a shop keeper’s assistant, farmer, writer, sociologist, and statesman. Howard valued good living conditions, democracy, nature, human rights, and personalities. Howard lived in England and America (London, Nebraska, and Chicago). Osburn and Mumford added notes that introduce, critique, review, and praise Howard. JH Osburn claims Howard may have been influenced by Bellamy’s book Looking Backward. According to Lewis Mumford, Howard was also inspired by Spense, Buckingham, Wakefield, George, Kropotkin, and Howard’s wife Elizabeth Ann Bills of Nuneaton (who loved intellect and country-side). Howard’s narrow building lots were handed down from medieval English dimensions (20 x 130 ft).

Garden Cities of To-morrow begins by describing the “Three Magnets”: Town, Country, and Town-Country. Howard explains why we are attracted to the best of both Town and Country aspects. Town-Country benefits have cooperation, beauty, nature, green fields, green parks, good utilities, good commerce, social opportunity, high wages, low rents, low price rates, and low pollution!

In most chapters, Howard proposes how Garden Cities would function with diagrams. He describes inter-connected urban nodes. Central City is shown with a constellation of satellite micro-cities (garden cities, towns, villages, developments). Garden Cities at their heart have a central garden, with rings of dwellings, shops, roads, industry, fields, and farms. The ordered layout is meant to improve biological, social, economic, and personal life for everyone.

Howard considered some difficulties with analytic self-criticism. He saw the weak points in his plans, and how they might fail. This foresight can allow us to prepare for the worst problems, to better shape designs for the future. He maintained that human ideals are worth trying; quoting Darwin “Selfish and contentious men will not cohere, and without coherence nothing can be accomplished,”. Howard believed that Socialism and Individualism must come together in the future to realize a true, vital organic society and state.

Ebenezer Howard felt that Garden Cities would work, because the plans were based on understanding human nature. He indicated that Urban or Communal failures are a result of the ‘Duality Principle’ (Janus). Ignorance of the Duality Principle allows kindred mistakes, by regarding one principle action to the exclusion of others. Howard believed we are all communists to some degree, even those that shudder at being told this, because we believe in roads, parks, and libraries. Individualism is no less excellent, in his mind, as he compares good society to an orchestra that plays together, but practice separately. Expense, however, always tends to get in the way of progress.

Sir Raymond Unwin worked with Howard. In 1903 they designed and established the first Garden City in England, named ‘Letchworth’. Letchworth proved a success, and in 1919 the second Garden City ‘Welwyn’ was founded. By 1950 the cities had a combined population of over 40,000. The account of their success is given in Purdom’s Building of Satellite Towns. Some key points regarding the study of Garden Cities are: how urban and rural districts connect, health and sanitation, zoning limitations of density and sprawl allowing light, gardens, and leisure, harmony rather than standardization, communications, ownership and cooperative leasing, public freedom and choice of enterprise.

Contemporary critics dismissed “Garden Cities” as more akin to the fantasy of H.G. Wells, than to the realities of urban planning. Despite the critics, Garden Cities of To-morrow is cited in countless planning bibliographies, and provides an organic alternative to bleak industrial future city-scapes. So what happened? Our suburbs in America do not follow his models, although some are better than others. Howard wanted to keep the city, town, and country distinct from each other, unlike amorphous suburban sprawl. He wanted more green around and in cities, by confining and condensing urban development, to keep the country rural, pastoral, and agrarian; yet integrating their foundations for healthy and function living.

“The pathway of any experiment worth achieving, is strewn with failures. Success is, for the most part, built on failure.”  – Ebenezer Howard

“Creative work always arises by the synthesis in one’s mind of material from otherwise unrelated sources…”  – J.H. Osburn

Related Article:  Garden City Chapters

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