Archive for education

SCOD Economic Theory Series

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Economics, Multimedia Communication, Organic Development, Philosophy, Politics, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 3, 2017 by Drogo

Essays on Educational, Employment, and Systemic Economic Problems and Solutions

by Drogo Empedocles; May 2017

In 2017 I am producing a series of recordings and essays on ‘SCOD Economics’. This Economic series includes interviews and biographies across disciplines, and intends to address both present injustices and futurist hopes. We will discuss injustice within our educational and political system, that adversely affects people with alternative thoughts or theories that are not accepted by the conventional establishment corporate ideology frame-work that contains and controls most of the World. We are given their propaganda that “we can all have any job we want, so long as we try hard and get good grades”. Our reality based on my experience is more like “most of us can have at least a minimum-wage job with few benefits, for a limited amount of time, without job security, pathetic interest for savings accounts, the job we find may be against our own interests, and those who cannot get good grades or are bad at following orders get nothing and will probably end up in jail or homeless”. Despite these problems which I have personally witnessed and experienced, the final goal of the series is to plan for a better more sustainable tomorrow for future generations; even if the series conclusions are largely ignored within our life-times.

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SCOD Economic Permaculture & Futurist Interviews:

Tom the Data Scientist, Libertarian

Cheri M. the Permaculturalist

Beamer the Scientist, Liberal

Aeyla the Care Giver, Independent

Scorpion the Homeless, Independent

Drogo the Architect, Green

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SCOD Economic Commentaries:

My Favorite Job Was Teaching

How Crony-Capitalism Affects Education

Homeless Ways of Life

Public Art and Street Teaching

Alternative Economic Education

Graduate School Politics in Colleges & University

Permaculture in Economics, Business, & Politics

Quest For Consciousness

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References:

Economics Professor Mark Blyth

Economics Professor Wolff

MIT Professor Noam Chomsky

(Page Under Construction – links and more will be added soon)

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The Secret of Childhood by Maria Montessori

Posted in Education / Schools, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 4, 2016 by Drogo

Book report on The Secret of Childhood by Maria Montessori (1966 version)

Learning how to enjoy learning by asking questions, and liking what you do; not just doing what you want or are told to do.

Content Summary

Childhood: A Social Problem

Era of the Child; Psycho-analysis secret

Newborn Child – Alien Environment, Natural Instincts, Spirit Incarnation

Psychic Development – sensitive periods, observations

Order – Inner / Outer

Intelligence, Growth, Sleep, Walking, Rhythm, Movement, Comprehension, Love

Montessori Method Origins

Normalization

Deviation – pampering, fugues, barriers, cures, attachment, possessive, power, fear, truth

Conflict – adult vs child

Instinct to Work

Guiding, Teaching, Rights, Mission

Conventional ‘direct teaching’ impedes child learning, based on the erroneous assumption that teaching molds young minds. The will-power of the child to create their own skills (walking, talking, eating, etc), is how children learn. Children have the power to change their own behavior, and are more successful when it is self motivated. The key is to determine where teaching and self-motivation meet in each case.

Children will notice with frustration, that they are considered unreliable and weak compared to less fragile adults. This dissociative relationship between the helpless child and their environment causes children to think of themselves as hopelessly inferior, and combined with social competition makes them desperate for attention and constant continuing dissatisfaction as they grow. In many ways this conditions people to be fighters and survivalists, which are certainly strong roles; and is naturally similar to resistant forces that cause a tree to grow denser and shorter if there are high winds, or thin and tall with little wind. However there is a problem with children viewing themselves as less valuable than the objects they are forbidden to touch, as without self worth, they have nothing to lose by hurting themselves or others.

If a child is to develop their own interior life, they must be allowed to touch things, and work rationally; as this can help them early on to develop considerate habits of acting. They must develop ethics by their own free-will, although we can guide them. Establishing sustainable successions of working actions, based on rational play, is successful education.

Good Sex Means Loving Sex

Posted in Health & Fitness, Pagan, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on September 27, 2016 by Drogo

“The Goddess loves good sex. Good sex is not separate from love, compassion, passion, healing, caring, and sensuality; it IS all of those things and more when we are able to achieve orgasm. Orgasms are physical and spiritual ecstasy combined. Orgasms are called climaxes because they are the highest our physical bodies can take our minds, by transcending consciousness through love on the material plane. Our minds of course really experience the bliss, as with intense exercise or other more mental spiritual connections. Many people have tried to discredit the sacred acts of sexual love over the years, but it is a mistake to abuse the gift of loving sexual contact, just as it is a mistake to abuse drugs. Sex and medicine should always be used for helping ourselves or others, and not to harm. Healthy and moderate masturbation is a form of good sex. Bad sex involves physical abuse, mental abuse, callus emotions, addiction, or rape; which often makes victims hate even the word ‘sex’. Good sex once a day can keep the demons at bay.

Sex is not for everyone. Besides babies and children that do not know enough about the adult world to have mature relations with others; there are asexual (non-sexual) people that are either opposed or ambivalent about sex, for various reasons. This is why it is important to be able to talk about sex. The statistics of rape and abuse are still shockingly horrible. Oberlin College recommended that students have healthy dialogue about sex, before engaging in it, to avoid misunderstanding or regrets. Some people refuse to talk about sex, and even if they love having sex, their inability to communicate (if they are mute they can use sign language or letters) can be an indication that they may not know how they feel about sex, which as with mixed signs, means ‘be careful’.

Even victims of bad sex handle their recovery and healing and coping differently. Women can have very different attitudes about sex, perhaps more than men. Some women have orgasms while giving oral sex! Some women do not like to masturbate, but love sex with strangers. There are infinite combinations of preferences regarding sex. Pursue what pleases you, but not at the cost of others. If a person is not interested in having sex with you, and it has been made clear to you that they are aggressively afraid of you and hateful of your advances; then avoid them as much as possible.

Having good sex means being able to enjoy it, so find what works for you; with or without partners. If you have sex with a partner, try to do what you can to please them and check to make sure they are pleased as best you can. This is how reciprocal love works. If you can be loving and enjoy sex, then sex is good. Good sex is not just performance of an act, it is feeling good inside, while helping and being helped by thoughts and (if we are lucky enough) touch from another.”

– The Witch Goddess, Loving Sex by Miss Arta

michelle4

Absorbent Mind, by Maria Montessori

Posted in Book Reports, Education / Schools, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on August 17, 2016 by Drogo

1949 Book – by the author and founder of Montessori Method

  • translation 1958, 1967 edition

Children play a part in World Reconstruction – humanity is still immature; it has a long way to go to become a peaceful utopia. Philosophers must take control, and begin teaching our youngest children early, so they may grow up and contribute to the greatness of humanity. Our human greatness begins at birth, new children are the makers of men.

Education is for Life. The psychic mind of each child, is simply their psychology of the soul. We learn by absorbing knowledge and experience. Gandhi said that education must be coextensive with life, and the central point of teaching must be to affirm and defend life. This good education feeds peaceful revolution.

Phases of growth can be considered as periods of time as the child grows older. Period 1: child ages 0-3, period 2: child ages 3-6, Period 3: child ages 6-12

Creation is a miracle. Modern biology is turning in a new direction towards children. Good parenting can produce better citizens, because good parenting makes the adult and the child more humane. Even in the wild, savage lions are tender with their cubs. Children are not just copies of their parents, they teach willing parents by bringing out their best sides. The instinct to defend our young, is often more powerful than our instinct to run away from danger; this is evidence of the intense power that children have over many parents. Cell division in the genesis of becoming being, is a natural miracle of microscopic multiplication. Babies evolve into adults, much like mammals have evolved from reptiles; and even between species, embryos look very similar.

Independence, Language, and Obstacles – discovering independence is naturally thrilling for children, our brains are set up to reward the work of learning. Environmental experience gives children language and obstacles to challenge and shape them. Eyes are camera obscuras that allow us to see objects, but it is our minds that process what we see. Without language, we would have no civilization.

Intelligence and the Hand – in the development of appendages, the legs are clearly more important for mobility; and our hands are for everything else, including cooking, feeding, craft, and social complexity. Our dexterous prehensile abilities give us tool making advantages over other animals. Our brains enable us to use our hands for communication, as well as our mouths.

Development and Imitation – practice of skills is vital for complex and successful imitation

Unconscious creators can become conscious workers, and vice versa.

Culture and Imagination – one person’s boring stagnation is another person’s enjoyable comfort zone; in between perpetual entropy and growth. We are like volcanoes, that erupt with changes naturally, through-out our lives.

Character during childhood is a personal achievement, but can obstruct learning in school.

Social contributions, unit cohesion, and normalizing – knowing when to concentrate and when to move on to something new, could be considered in ‘normalcy levels’.

Correction and Obedience (3 levels)

Obedience is seen as something which develops in the child in much the same way as other aspects of his character. At first it is dictated purely by the vital impulses, then it rises to the level of consciousness, and thereafter it goes on developing, stage by stage, till it comes under the control of the conscious will. – The Absorbent Mind.

Montessori Three Obedience Levels:

1. Partial Obedience

2. Blind Obedience

3. Compassionate Obedience

The First Level of Obedience

“What we call the first level of obedience is that in which the child can obey, but not always. It is a period in which obedience and disobedience seem to be combined.” (Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, 1964)

In order to obey one must not only to wish but also be able to obey. To carry out an order one must already possess some degree of maturity and a measure of the special skill that it many need.  Hence we first have to know whether the child’s obedience is practically possible at the level of development the child has reached…If the child is not yet master of his actions, if he cannot obey even his own will, so much the less can he obey the will of someone else. – The Absorbent Mind.

The Second Level of Obedience

A period when the child can always obey, when there are no obstacles deriving from his lack of control. His powers are now consolidated and can be directed not only by his own will, but by the will of another. The child can absorb another person’s wishes and express them in his own behaviour. – The Absorbent Mind.

 “The second level is when the child can always obey, or rather, when there are no longer any obstacles deriving from his lack of control. His powers are now consolidated and can be directed not only by his own will, but by the will of another.” (Montessori, The Absorbent Mind, 1964) This may appear to be the highest level of obedience; however, because it is dependent on outside variables (adults or authority figures), this is not true obedience. The child is merely satisfying someone else’s wishes, not his own.

The Third Level of Obedience

The third level of obedience is when the child gets joy and pleasure from unquestionably obeying someone superior, no matter the request, such as obeying a respected and much loved teacher without question.

The child “responds promptly and with enthusiasm and as he perfects himself in the exercise, he finds happiness in being able to obey.” (Montessori, The Discovery of the Child, 1967) This is the stage of true self-discipline.

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Discipline and Love – “Work is love made visible.” – Gibran (The Prophet 1948)

END

Reference – Minding “On The Dot” by M.V O’Shea in Montessori Talks to Parents (Series One, Volume Two) The Road to Discipline NAMTA 1979. 

Montessori Revolution In Education

Posted in Book Reports, Education / Schools, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on March 25, 2016 by Drogo

E. M. Standing 1962

“The child is father of the man.” – Wordsworth

“In children lies the seed corn of the future.” – Froebel

“Who touches the child, touches the most sensitive point of a whole being, which has roots in the most distant past and climbs toward the infinite future.” – Montessori

Revolution in education, Montessori is a self-conscious modern zeitgeist. This book talks about Montessori fundamental principles, infants classes, brooms, binomial theorems, under fives, Lilliput, the movement in America, the Whitby School joy of learning, the Santa Monica Sophia School, and 12 method points.

Children can learn on their own in many ways, if we can consciously create a safe and liberal environment for them to explore tools, and in the process, them-selves. Learning the Montessori method requires practical experience being involved in it, to understand the abstract theories. Montessori method is not a closed system, it can change and adapt with modern technology and cultural beliefs. The main Montessori principle might be summed up as ‘guided sensorial self-education’. Children go through a literal physical metamorphosis, and their brains or minds are part of that process. The way children learn, is more unconscious, than conscious. All children are responsible for their own learning in Montessori method; in relation to their sensory, motor, and creative abilities. Spontaneous activity can fuel cultural learning that are true experiments to the child. It takes imagination for an adult teacher to comprehend the amount of work this takes for a child.

“The Universe is nothing but a big, buzzing, booming confusion,” to the new-born infant (William James). Out of this bewildering chaos of impressions, which pour upon the senses of children, the tiny one has a challenge of building an orderly mental structure of their cosmos. Every child is born an explorer, as they wonder at the mysteries around them. The World can open to the child, if they are given full play in school for their spirit to roam as it feels comfortable or confident enough to do, with time. Montessori materials are ordered in order to facilitate abstract order in the mind; tools to structure the young mind. This is why the correct use of materials as teaching tools is emphasized.

Cylinder psychology – 3.5 years old. Language, words, abstract concepts (like ‘muchness’) formed from experiencing objects with those assigned values. Sensorial materials are effective because they isolate the stimulus (length, magnitude, color, or pitch etc). Prepared paths lead to more order. Inspirations of learning are called ‘Montessori explosions’. Math abstracted into physical volumes can be more easily understood, (Table of Pythagoras) and forms a basis for advanced concepts later. In Montessori ‘mental hooks’ are used to connect children with materials; the hooks are built into the designs and psychological instructions. The success of this education relies on getting children to obey authority, self govern, and problem solve as young as possible.

Deviations from normal mental development certainly remain debatable regarding definition and response. Many people think it is natural for children to be loud, rowdy, and boisterous; yet Montessori believes that it is disobedient rebellion, tantrums, and lying that is deviant behavior (based on the norms of society). In this way strong immersive imagination can even be considered deviant. Montessori uses disciplined freedom, to train minds to navigate the vastness of reality.

Montessori graduates become ‘new children’, because they enlightened and awakened to a new way of higher civilized learning and living. A school is a children’s house, where they can feel at home. Sound shakers, color tablets, bells, primary shapes, spelling, number rods, pink tower, cylinders, broad stairs, math beads and volumes, these tools are all keys to the Montessori method.

Montessori Notes

Posted in Education / Schools, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 22, 2016 by Drogo

My mother was my Montessori teacher. In addition to these notes, i have reported on these books: Montessori Revolution,  Absorbent Mind, and  Secret of Childhood. – Drogo

American Montessori Society Bulletin  1979 – vol.17, No.1

Piaget and Montessori In The Classroom – by David Elkind, Tufts University

“Classroom practice, of whatever variety, presupposes a particular conception of the child. In this chapter, four components of Piaget’s and Montessori’s conception of the child are described, together with examples of the sort of educational practice that follows from them.”

Elkind goes on to explain 2 different methods of teaching, by referencing 2 different classrooms where children were using the ‘pink tower’ blocks incorrectly. In one case the teacher corrected the children, and in the other they allowed the play. In theory, he said, both are justified.

Child as capable of self-regulation – learning materials tap mental potential

Child as a cognitive alien – they think different than adults, like foreigners

Child as a logical thinker – young people use logic to make decisions

Child as emotional countryman – they have adult emotions that affect behavior

Summary

The first task of the teacher is to observe children, then let that inform how you teach them. It is the teacher’s conception of the child, which in the end, determines the nature of the teacher-child affective interaction using specific methods and techniques. Do not assume what children know or understand, because everyone is different in their awareness, development, and rationality. Respect for children is important, so that they can begin to emulate respect for teachers, others, and themselves. Teaching should be guided by these factors.

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Children Learn in Different Ways

Proceedings, American Montessori Society

1975, Granby Colorado

Learning As Creation, by John Bremer

Child Development, by J.M. Hunt

Montessori Day Care Panel

Kephart Development Model, by Nancy Miles

Gellner Rationale of Learning Disabilities, by Ward and Haise

Organizations Serving Young Children

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Learning As Creation, by John Bremer

Dr. John Bremer founded ‘School-Without-Walls’, Parkway Program, Cambridge

Bremer starts off with a joke about how he once stood up in front of people, and his pants did not. He says “as long as you’ll remember my pajama bottoms all the way through, then I guess I won’t feel too embarrassed about what I say.” Then he proposes a role for the student, as an artist. The artist should understand ‘three essential elements’: material, ideal, and skill. Bremer says that ‘temporal arts’ have a strong presence in time. Songs, music, and dance are temporal arts; you do not “see it before yours eyes as a totally finished thing. You experience it through time.” Temporal arts are more of a ‘process’, than they are an complete object. Bremer says that human beings are more dancers than sculptors, in how they live their lives. “Everything is a rehearsal, and yet everything is the only performance we will ever give. In that way it is incredibly beautiful and also incredibly frightening.” Students should be considered with the humane respect that we might give an adult artist; they are people. He considers the term ‘student’ to be almost equal to ‘artist’. Student = Artist. Teaching means introducing the student to materials, ideals, and skills. School is an activity, not a place; but the structure of a building does matter, as architecture affects learning. Psychological disposition is inherent in education, we all have our own ways or styles of teaching and learning. The student should ‘recreate the wheel’ to be the master of technology, rather that its slave. Also moral responsibility should be introduced by the teacher, so they do not create a ‘Frankenstein’ situation. One way of introducing morality, is to create community, as a bridge between society and individuals. Community to him meant people coming together and cooperatively carrying out common purposes. “We will never all be dancing, we will never all be still.” We dance with others to share love and friendship.

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Child Development, by J.M. Hunt

Dr. Hunt, Professor Emeritus of Psychology from University of Illinois

Plasticity is important in early psychological development. Intelligence should no longer be limited by predetermined training, but be allowed to expand and flourish with imaginative experiences. Education is important in the process of learning rules, and but to also think beyond the ‘box’. Piaget described the sensory motory phase as a kind of ‘shell game’. The child develops in progressive sequences, or steps.

Hunt goes on to address Head Start, IQ, vocab, and verbal tests and ages. IQ is not fixed, it fluctuates through-out a person’s life-time. 7 ordinal scales: object construction, strategy means (schemes), imitation gesture (physical), vocal imitation (tonal), operational causality, object relations, object relation. Branches of learning can develop at different rates, this is natural; in accordance with genetics and circumstances like environmental nurturing, social effects, and local area situations. The problem of ‘the match’ is how an equilibrium between stages of development can be key to complex phases of child education. When cognition is lacking, motivation is necessary; as found in The Secret of Childhood, by Montessori. Like the Pavlovian ‘What is it?’ reflex; change of habituated input, recognitive familiarity, and the challenge of ‘old-vs-new’ attraction stimuli all matter greatly. Observe, create, and make sure you are free to adapt your methods in order to teach better.

Maria Montessori: Her Life and Work

Montessori Mother, by Dorothy Fisher

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Montessori Day Care Panel

reported by Janice Sullivan

Children’s House, Broomfield, Colorado

Integrating Montessori into Public Education – existing materials, introduce practical life area, order Montessori materials, regroup into groups of 30 children (max), maintain order, demonstrate activities. Varies local services were addressed. A ratio of non-Montessori staff and aides are allowed.

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Kephart Developmental Model

Nancy Miles, NC KGH Achievement Center, Fort Collin, CO

Systems and Structures – The total environmental concept: the home, school, community, peer group; all play a part in shaping a child’s behavior, through demands for response or interaction. Kephart Child Development Theory of Stages of Learning: motor, motor-perceptual, perceptual-motor, perceptual, perceptual-conceptual, conceptual-perceptual. Audition, Vision, and Kinesthesia should be integrated.

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Gellner Rationale of Learning Disabilities, by Ward and Haise

This article criticizes the Gellner approach, but talks about how it is compatible with other systems. It is a neuro-psychological concept of mental retardation, which includes some useful tools for training students that may not be able to fully understand conventional topics. Gellner said that children who are classed as retarded, mainly have brain impairments of either a structural or bio-chemical character. These impairments prevented normal integration of impulses coming from various parts of the body. Senses play a very important part in our learning. Gellner came up with 4 sensory neural systems: 2 involve vision, and 2 involve audition. Mentally retarded children cannot learn in the same ‘normal’ ways, because they suffer from sensory deprivation.

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Organizations Serving Young Children

Reported by Jim Hennes

The panel concluded that the session had been important in pulling together these representatives, and that future efforts should be made to share some time together among organizations.

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Montessori Quotes

“Education demands only this: the utilization of the inner powers of the child for his own instruction.”

“The essence of the independence is to be able to do something for one’s self.”

“A child’s work is to create the person they will become. An adult works to perfect the environment, but a child works to perfect them-self.”

“Development comes from environmental experience.”

To have learned something is, for a child, only a point of departure. What is necessary after that is a period of digestion or maturation, a period of intense and prolonged mental activity.”

“The more fully the needs of one period are met, the greater will be the success of the next.”

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“Teacher, teacher look at me now,

my days are light, my time is right

because you showed me how.

Teacher teacher look what I can do

my lines are straight, they are perfect mates

across the paper blue.

and if you’ll hold my hand

I’ll skip the land and gather flowers new –

hey teacher, teacher, look at me now

just look what I can do.”

– Anon

 

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Organic Education

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization, Education / Schools, SCOD Online School, Services, Sales or Trade, Sustainability with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 3, 2014 by Drogo

Independent Scholar Vouchers

Hear me all those with a college diploma, ye who think thou art superior to those without a college diploma.

Hear me all those without a college diploma, who think that bosses will only realize your worth if you get a college diploma.

I have a Masters Degree in Architecture from Savannah College of Art & Design. Yes I think I earned it. Yes I am proud of it. Yes the paper diploma, the school documents, and the thousands of dollars of loans do not mean that I am smarter, more intelligent, or wiser than if I had been taught many of the same things by other means.

Sure I value many of my college experiences. Yes I retain much of the knowledge I received from the 6 years. Yes I value the friends and teachers I had. Yes many of classes I took were of little value after I graduated for the types of jobs that I had. Yes many of the classes I took are largely obsolete in my life today, because of who I am. Who I am includes life changes, life choices, phases of various interests, and realizing how I want to define myself as an adult. When I was in college I was a teenager, becoming the adult I thought I wanted to be; which was in contrast to becoming the adult I thought was expected to be by other adults. Now I am a grey-haired adult, becoming the adult I think I now want to be; which is not entirely the same adult that I became previously.

Now, let us talk about self-education, independent tutoring, and community learning. Self-education can be reading a book, talking to someone, or learning that a person experiences or realizes during or after a variety of hobbies, social events, or work periods. Independent tutoring means self-education by means of personal tutors, or Master-Apprentice relationships. Community learning means groups of individuals learning from mutual shared experiences and interactions; this can include civic or work place social works. I believe these are all part of mainstream public and private education through schooling; but they are also important alternatives to mainstream schooling.

I personally have always learned best by studying subjects by my own standards, and on my own time schedule. I have always loved learning in general; but just as I prefer good teachers, nice bosses, and generous loved ones; I also prefer learning in fun and free ways best. So why do we have standard schooling, besides the fact that it is a tradition? My answer is that the bell system of classes is based on factory efficiency, and not on organic quality education. Organic quality education can occur through self-education, tutoring, and community learning by themselves; without factory standard schools.

I do think if the only type of education for the masses that the government will fund is standard public schooling, than it is good that at least one type of education is provided for by our tax money. I would rather organic personal learning be funded by our government at whatever scale, but what we have is probably better than nothing. One alternative cultural situation could be that organic education be so popular and mainstream that no taxes at all would need to be collected for education of any kind, because people would want to spend all of their money on education as soon as they earn it; as though it were a commercial or drug trend like sports, cars, or alcohol.

I propose a theory of organic education using the 3 organic methods as previously stated; that would be verified by an Independent Scholar Voucher (ISV) system. I, as an independent scholar, can vouch for another independent scholar that I have witnessed, taught, or worked with enough to defend their claim of educational learning to a certain ‘degree’. In this way I am willing to defend such Voucher titles, to the point of publicly challenging any opposition to the claim. Do you know of any public or private institution that would be willing to wrestle or fight a person that did not value your educational ‘degree’ that you earned from them? Fuck no. Would I fight for your right to express your personal organic education, if I could vouch for it with confidence? Fuck yes!

fourways temple