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Incredible Hulk Psychology

Posted in Cartoon Comics, Fictional Characters, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2019 by Drogo

Incredible_Hulk_Vol_1_273

This essay is from a SCOD video on the Marvel Hulk comic-books. Is the system working for you? Do you work for the system? Do you have a balance?? Dr. Banner worked within the nuclear science field, and was cursed with the alter-ego of the Hulk after a gamma-bomb test radiation accident. The main over-arching human theme of the ‘System vs Individuals’ originated because the military industrial complex created the Hulk, and Banner uses technology to handle his Hulk problem, but he is always chased by the military as a terrorist because the The Incredible Hulk was very aggressively anarchist libertarian (in effect by savage nature, not due to political ideology) due to his resistance to authority and desire to be left alone. In ‘Marvel: Five Fabulous Decades of the World’s Greatest Comics’Les Daniels addresses the Hulk as an embodiment of cultural fears of radiation and nuclear science. He quotes Jack Kirby: “As long as we’re experimenting with radioactivity, there’s no telling what may happen, or how much our advancements in science may cost us.” Daniels continues, “The Hulk became Marvel’s most disturbing embodiment of the perils inherent in the atomic age.”

The main character core theme for individual psychology is obviously anger (but also fear) as one part of the aggressive/passive dichotomy paradigm; because anger is the main catalyst for his change, and calmness allows the beast to sleep within him again. A third theme might be danger/safety (violence/gentleness), survival regardless of emotions. A fourth theme could be the stoic sadness of living with guilt and responsibility for problems. Humans are animals, but we seek to control our id, ego, and emotions for the sake of society and civilization. The Hulk deals with debates about man and monster, where does one personality end and the other begin??  Oddly enough, his rage doesn’t make him evil or the antagonist in the story. Can he be both a hero and an anti-hero?? Originally the Hulk transformed at night (1962), then randomly. It was not until after about the 30th comic book (1966) with Hulk in it [Tales To Astonish #80], that ANGER became his main catalyst for transformation. Hulk influenced popular culture so much, that the term ‘hulk out’ means to get enraged and rampage. “Don’t make me angry; you won’t like me when I’m angry.” – Dr. Banner (TV show)

Dr. Banner is a scientist dealing with some serious mental issues. As he evolves, so does his monstrous manifestation. The egos of the various incarnations exist within Banner, as Banner exists within them. The metaphor being that our different personality aspects and phases of life exist within us. Who we ‘really are’ does not have to be limited to just one personality, or set of emotional responses. I actually cannot think of a depiction that does not consider them within each-other as they are obviously connected, even if they are also beings in their individual ways.

The Jekyll-Hyde story is not just about literal appearance differences; also about mental disorders and addiction, physical (chemical) and mental bi-polar and border-line… all kinds of things to think about with split-personality concepts (not the diagnosis but the reality of how emotions can be overly intense with many people, making them seem like different people when they experience them).

[More will be added later to this article, like illustrations of the Evolution of Hulk; and more story plot points and descriptions.]

Youtube video:  Incredible Hulk Comics 1970-1990

Youtube video:  Incredible Hulk fan tribute collage – ‘evolution montage’

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social Anarchy Dream

Posted in Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 24, 2017 by Drogo

Poetic Essay by Drogo Empedocles

Social psychology is affected by our social subconscious, metaphorically translated from and by cultural myths, regional legends, and local lore. In Jungian terms, we have collective dreams….. The split in philosophy between science and psychology is largely ignored by the masses, due to politics and economics. Our current political-economic model of Capitalism ensures that the masses remain subjugated, and the masses are increasingly aware of that. When having a car becomes required for lower class jobs, having a car is no longer a luxury, it is a burden of responsibility. Each new mandatory requirement of society, becomes a shackle upon humanity. If some of those shackles can be removed by government, it would be possible to have real democracy. That would then bring up the need to define democracy relative to our needs; which is the question of what natural or civil rights are, and how they should be allowed to be expressed by law.

But of course some say government is always a problem, and less of it is better than more regardless of population; yet I cannot stop thinking that with more population is more government needed? Indeed perhaps every citizen should be an ambassador or counsel for council some times. One might call that social anarchy.

Future of SCOD

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Organic Development, SCOD Council, Sustainability with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 26, 2014 by Drogo

“Sometimes i think about the future of SCOD. It is very much a reality for me. i have been involved with another group of friends that originally began as a book study group based on the works of Daniel Quinn’s Ishmael and later, his other books. This evolved into a discussion group concerned with cultural collapse, environmental collapse and sustainability. This group of friends has maintained relationships with one another since 1997. Many, many people have come and gone in the group, partially due to the mobility of our culture. We had a picnic in the park today and talked about how we came into the group and what made us stay. Over the years we’ve talked about deepening our commitment through tribal ventures, community, etc. None of that has really happened on a grand scale but what has survived is the give support-get support that Quinn talks about in his books.
That brings me to SCOD. i was drawn to SCOD because of the similarities. We don’t have the luxury of physical closeness that my orignal group has (although some of us in our Ishmael group are several miles from each other) since SCODians are spread all over the country… and some outside the country. However, because of the internet we are able to share things on a daily basis. We can ask for advice, learn new things, share our own experiences and ideas. …or just be there if someone needs a friend. Developing local groups is the best way to create commitment, but not always feasible. The SCOD village and pub would make a huge difference as a place to bring all these practices into fruition. There are so many talented, active, caring, sharing people in this group and it would be awesome to get lots of them together in one place.

It is my hope that for those of you that are able, to reach out and be there for each other. As time goes by you will find it is one of the best investments you’ve made in your life. But for now i am content to have all of you people as my friends. Thank you for enriching my life so much and helping me to continue to grow.”

– Karen Boe

Heart of Darkness

Posted in Book Reports with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 29, 2009 by Drogo

Joseph Conrad’s the Heart of Darkness, takes place in a world within a world. It is a microcosm that contains dark places of the human soul (a region that Conrad vividly explores). At the ‘heart’ of this ‘planet of darkness’ is a rebel who has thrown away society as he knew it. This metaphoric ‘heart’ applies gravity to the plot. The ‘heart’ is epitomized in the character Kurtz.

 

Kurtz, the European ivory trader, has cast off his ties with the outside world, and has taken it upon himself to control and master his surroundings (including the natives). Kurtz represents man’s tendency to revert to animal instincts, and to exploit the weaker, (or ignorant) of the species. He becomes God to the natives, undoubtedly expanding his already crazed ego to the point of explosion. For most of the story, Kurtz is the unseen legend or myth.

 

I recommend this book to anyone interested in separate worlds apart from our own. It supplies (however limited) an in-depth look at an intricate sub-world of our planet. Conrad may not exhibit the intricateness of such authors as C.S. Lewis or J.R.R. Tolkien, but he definitely delves deep into the realm of creativity and human sub consciousness. Untold darkness lies within the mind of man.

 

Foot note:  The plot for the famous film set in Vietnam (“Apocalypse Now”) is based on Heart of Darkness.