Archive for ethics

SCOD Economic Theory

Posted in Economics, Organic Development, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 16, 2016 by Drogo

Imagine for a minute that Capitalism was not ‘the only economic system that works’, as popular opinion believes; but instead that Capitalism is a failed system by humanitarian standards, that greedy people perpetuate so that no government can ever serve its’ citizens democratically. Most conservative capitalists would rather see church morality imposed on the masses, because that is their only response to the failings of Capitalism. When homeless get no government support, the capitalists will say “if they are too lazy to work, then they should find a church to take pity on them.” When a crazy person wants to exercise their amendment rights, rather than recommending they get help or take free medicine, the capitalists will say “they need to commit a crime so that we can put them in prison”. What if instead of trying to cover up for the failings of a selfish individualist economic system, we instead worked hard to practice an economic system that is for the common good, with its own built-in ethical code? SCOD economic theory is a combination of trade-barter and spiritual morality*. SCOD theory uses a sensible code of economic ethics* to foster transactions.

Offer only as much as you can spare, do not gamble all that you have. The higher your price is, the less you want to exchange it. Before finalizing a trade, consider how the transaction will affect the other party; if that trade will hurt them and they are ethical traders, then cut them a bonus break-deal. A bonus break-deal is when you give them MORE than they asked for, because you appreciate them as an ethical individual.

Mutual trade with ethical responsibility and humanitarian benefit.

*morality is more to do with religious dogma of reward and punishment, and ethics is more about common sense and having social respect for the good of the whole community.

Princess and Her Pets

Posted in Book Reports, Dr. Dippie, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on January 15, 2016 by Drogo

princess pets

Princess and Her Pets – a book for pet lovers

Princess loves her pets. They can do no wrong. Her pets only know peace, love, and fear; unlike bad people. Princess keeps her pets well groomed. She loves to pet them, comb them, and bathe them. She gives them treats when they are good, and they are always good. Her pets cause sneaky mischief, stinky stink-stink, and have a silly habit of killing people; but Princess loves them one and all!

Analysis of Apostles of Success

Posted in Book Reports, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Economics, History with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 15, 2013 by Drogo

Apostles of the Self-Made Man: Changing Concepts of Success in America

1965 book by John G. Cawelti – University of Chicago Phoenix Press – 280 pages

 Success

SUMMARY

This is a book about the popular culture of success in America. It discusses natural qualities of character, education, values, and needs of individuals and society. It is a decent American history of changing concepts of success; with a focus on three main sources: historic individuals, fictional figures, and manual guides. It uses literature as a source to reference social history.

In spite of their persistent devotion to the idea of success, Americans have differed greatly in the way they defined it. That is the subject of this book. – p.3

Though the self-made man wasn’t an American invention, Americans have cherished the notion of someone rising out of poverty and, through hard work and dedication, achieving at least a moderate amount of wealth and respect. Purely American icons such as Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson each wrote about the opportunity for anyone in a fluid American class system to grow through their own power towards a particular position in society. Yet, much like Abraham Lincoln in the tumultuous ante-bellum period and the Gilded Age’s robber barons, the self-made man appeared most notably in times of rapid change and transition . – C.1

Three Strands of American Success

  1. Religious – Protestant Work Ethic and pious morality

  2. Economic – wealth = success

  3. Complex Individual and Social Ethics and Dreams, often combining the first 2 stands

American society saw three main versions of the self-made man emerge in epitomizing the ideal of success. The first focused on a Protestant notion of “piety, frugality, and diligence” in fulfilling the duties of one’s occupation. This version suggested that a static, stable social order existed in which success was the attainment of respectability in this world and led to the assurance of salvation in the world to come. As strict Protestantism gave way to other, secular notions of success, this ideal began to fade away.

The second tradition placed a premium on a more economic emphasis of success. While the first focused on religious notions of grace and propriety, the second enlisted the purely lay qualities of aggressiveness, competitiveness, and forcefulness. As industrialization swept over the United States in the Gilded Age and beyond, people prescribed to this ideal of success beyond the scope of religion. The hierarchical structure of many new corporations demanded such qualities from their employees if they hoped to “climb the ladder of success.” The third type of success, was a combination of the former two; taking ethics and humility from religious loyalty, in an existential industrial work environment.

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For more of the report, click on the link here for SCOD Gallery Report with Chapter Links!

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5 Rule Theory on Gaming

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Psychology with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 4, 2011 by Drogo

Drogo’s Gaming Theory

Five Rules for Roleplaying, Rollplaying, and related playing of strategy and character based games…


Playing games for fun is not a phase for me. I don’t only play the latest and coolest, most trendy games. Nor have I even been in a regular group of gamers in years. However I do consider myself a Master of several games, at least in one or two capacities. One of those games I played for years with other people was Dungeons & Dragons. After 10 years of playing I was a Master Dungeon Master, proficient at a few styles of control. It was during my apprenticeship to older Dungeon Masters that I acquired my philosophy of game play.

My favorite Dungeon Masters had similar traits, although they did not know each other. Their ways of controlling was compatible with their ways of playing. Their dominant traits tended to avoid or deny gain by intentional selfishness, rudeness, greed, or cruelty. If spite bias was ever used, it was for conflict resolution. Here I will attempt to list the guidelines of my theory for running games:

1. Prepare ahead of time, so that game play will run smoothly. Preparation can minimize lost time searching through notes or the rule book. Have a few conclusions in mind, and what the psychological results might be.

2. Roll alot of dice to maintain a continuous element of Neutrality, while guiding the story.

3. Guide the story with subtle bias in favor of the characters because you care about the individual people playing.

4. Foster morality and ethics by rewarding ‘goodness’ and punishing ‘badness’. This concept is relative to Character Alignment. Good characters will be guided or controlled by Good Deities, and Bad characters will be guided or controlled by Evil Deities. The result of this is that if the player acts ‘out-of-alignment’ and refuses to correct their behavior, the DM can step in and guide or control their character by using a ‘higher power’ (like a Deity) in the game.

For example if a player wants to play a ‘good’ character, but acts ‘bad’ then an Evil Deity can take control of their character. Whether the player gets control back, depends on whether or not the player modifies the alignment to fit their behavior, or changes their actions to fit the alignment better. If a player wants to play an evil character, and they are being awful to other players or the DM, the DM may retain control of their character through the Evil Deity indefinitely. This is one way to attempt to have good game play, rather than ban players or quit the game.

5. Help everyone to have fun!!!

* not included: tips on game writing or character creating