Archive for hiking

Overnight Backpack Camping Gear

Posted in Hikes, Trips, Walks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2014 by Drogo

Hiking Two Days / Camping One Night / Warm Weather

Backpack Camping Gear for Hiking to a Camping Spot and Back

Notes: I prefer to camp during the Summer (70-90 temps). Having hiked and camped almost every year of my life, i do not wear rain gear. Since im only a leisure hiker, i prefer to hike without rain; if  it rains I stop, set up a tarp, and prepare a small fire pit under the edge of the tarp to dry any wet clothing or gear until it stops. I keep the fire small so the heat does not go high enough to burn the tarp. More gear is needed for colder weather (below 70 degrees F). This list is only for nice, warm days and nights.

(this is Drogo’s opinion based on his American hiking experiences)

I divide the backpack gear into 3 categories (they are all related though):  Shelter, Cooking, and Personal Items

Shelter:  sleeping bag, straps, long cord, 2 tarps (minimum 7’x7′), tent / hammock (lighter weight for smaller people), sheet (blanket if chilly), flashlight

Cooking:  cook-pot (durable with secure lid), food (keep safe in cook-pot), water containers (minimum 2 liters), bowl / cup (durable), utensils (spoon, knife), fire items (scrap paper, matches, lighter)

Personal:  clothes (pants, shirt, 2 underwears, 2 sock pairs, head cover), Off, odorizer (deodorant, scented oil, lotion), medicine (prescriptions, spiritual, relaxant, celebration), medical kit (anti-bacterial, bandages),  tooth-brush & paste; small musical device (ipod, harmonica, flute), cell phone / camera, small book, writing tools (paper, pencils, pens, markers), towel / washcloth, walking stick…

* Drogo’s Common Backpack (personal preference)

backpack

pack inventoryTents

* see also:  Survival Inventory List

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Tofu Lizard Memoir 01

Posted in Fictional Characters, Fictional Stories, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 18, 2012 by Drogo

Tofu Lizard SCOD Journal Entry 1

*

Prelude

I first learned about SCOD while I was working at my office job in DC. One day I was surfing the net, and came across the SCOD website. I read some articles, watched some videos, and I was hooked. I realized that the Sustainable Cooperative for Organic Development (SCOD) was just the type of concept I had been unconsciously formulating in my own mind for years. My parents were hippies, I had heard about communes, and my friends and I had researched alternative energy as a hobby for many years. It was becoming very difficult for me to justify my modern conventional lifestyle with the scientific theories that I was learning about; you know the usual liberal theories like Climate Change, Sustainable Architecture, and Environmental Pollution. Combine knowledge of science with history, throw in a dose of ethics or spirituality, and something like SCOD is an unavoidable conclusion for someone like me. Sorry, but it just is.

The following memoir I had written is a record of my participation in SCOD, and bits of my biography pre-SCOD to give you context and perhaps allow average readers to understand that I was pretty normal, despite the fact that I made a gradual (albeit huge) change in my life that was very different at the time. My story follows the events of me leaving my office job, hiking the Appalachian Trail, and finding SCOD.

… [continued in Entry 2]

u can do anything, here’s how i did

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing, Trips with tags , , , , , , , , on March 24, 2012 by growing togehter

here’s how i ….
traveled-  my mom drove my sis and i from FL to CT, we took a train to NYC and that’s how i stood on the tallest building there.
my two friends split the cost of gas to CA and back, so i drove my car from coast to coast.  i stopped at the Grand Canyon on the way back, cause it was on the map.  for 25$ and a few nights of sleeping in my car.  i saw a deer jump off the edge and when i looked over i saw a circle of rocks, so i jumped too.  that’s how i came to jump off the Grand Canyon and rock climb about 50ft straight back up.  that was the scariest thing i’d ever done till i found myself walking on the side of a snow covered volcano in New Zealand.
i got to NZ because i gave up on getting my AA and was told that at 25yo i should move out of my mothers house.  i took the rest of my student loan, sold my truck and most of my stuff, got a bit of $ from my family.  i got my passport and looked up online how to get the 12month working holiday visa  and took a plane to NZ.  little over 4,000USD.  i got off the plane and found the information booth which helped me get a phone card/discount card for hostels.  then i got on to a bus to the city of Auckland.  after walking less than a block from the bus stop and into a hostel where i booked a room for 2 nights, i realized that i had way too much stuff.  i gave about half away after sleeping for over a day.  it was that easy.  a passport, visa (i got online for free) and a plane ticket!
the rest was talking to people.  other travelers tell you more than you need or ever care to know.  the locals tell you things you would have never thought to ask.  the best part is no matter where your from, what you do or don’t know, we can all communicate!  i met germans that knew less english then i know german, spanish kids who knew only spanish, french guys who only know french and some spanish, and we all expressed ourselves and understood the basics.  lots of hand movements and pointing and drawing pics and showing on the map or online.  one kid had an app on his cell that translated what he typed.
i spent all my $ in about 4 months and never got a job there.  i traveled for free much of the time.  couchsurfing.org  WWOOF (google it) and standing on the side of the road with a sign got me all over two islands!

traveling can be free.
most of it’s just about asking.  i asked the internet for a New Zealand visa and after a few clicks found it.  i asked my friends about going to CA and OH and then we went, sometimes sharing gas cost other times not.  i said that it’d be cool to see this or that and next thing i knew i was there.  many times i got asked if i’d like to… and it was as easy as saying yes, or even pointing out that i would love to if it’s cheap or free.

“it never hurts to ask!  what’s the worst that happens?  you get told no, well if you never ask it’s as good as a no.”

and i’d add, just keep asking, ask different ways and to as many people as you meet.  tell the world what you desire to see, do, or have!  the worst that could happen is you have to make or do it yourself.  likely tho you’ll end up asking the right person at some point and they will the ones to help you get it.

so that’s how i’ve seen America, Jamica, New Zealand, Camon Island’s, Mexico and it’s how i’ve climbed volcanoes, jumped out of a plane, camped in the forest and in a city, seem water falls, sat in how water rivers drinking wine by moon light, canoed for a week, swam in the oceans, went to a ren-fair in NZ and a few in the states, and that’s how i plane to see the rest of the world!

so… anyone going to Europe?  tibet?  china?  how about WA?  ok, maybe just around FL, i want to get out to tampa and back up to st. augustine, or just a canoe trip or camping weekend?

p.s. megabus is cheap for the east coast of USA, train passes are the cheapest for europe and hitching is best in NZ and AUS

safe traveling, be smart, think

Climbing the Hill

Posted in Loudoun Heights Hike with tags , , , , , on August 9, 2011 by Drogo

Moss Rock Falls, Outpost Hill

The new bridge construction (a few years back), improved the entry to Loudoun Heights. As I crossed under the bridge, I saw the familiar huge tree stump down by the river, still sitting there like a picnic table. Nettles and raspberry bush thorns plague the massive stone steps up to the plateau. New trees were planted on the plateau, but most have died so it is dominated by meadow plants; and of course big-leaf burr plants line the path so their seeds pods can cling to passing hikers.

A massive stone marks the beginning of Loudoun Heights Trail, like a strange transformer robot in hibernation. The dark grey limestone boulder has horizontal striation, in a suspicious pattern. Next up the trail are fern-topped rocks, moss covered stones, and a cliff of both with a small water-fall mountain stream crossing the path. It once flowed clear, but now it barely flows at a trickle.

After a couple of switch-backs, the trail arrives at a small clearing near the top of Outpost Hill, sometimes used as a campsite. Faeries live on and in this hill, with hidden treasures. Just beyond, along the trail are large trees, and a huge fallen pine log across a brook.

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