Archive for imagination

SCOD Design and Imagination

Posted in Cooperative collaboration, dreams, ecovillages, Ethics & Morals, Futurist, Organic Architecture, Psychology, relationships, Sustainability, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 6, 2020 by Drogo

SCOD Design and Imagination – Theory Essay [recording]

Why study SCOD design? Be prepared not only for possible problems by designing better now; but also if there are systemic collapses, having a core homestead village for redesigning a new way of life will be important. People who can afford independent homesteads will have them, but those without enough money need more affordable housing now and in the future.

Some willing and able to share space will be the heart of a scod village, others will be on the fringes as independent owners or temporary visitors; but having communal space for everyone is important for social life, public events, and council meetings. If everyone could afford their own property and everything they need like rich people, then most would do that; but the reality is that currently the way our economy works is that most people cannot earn enough to afford an independent life, and so most people need shared public property but rarely get enough from our federal, state, or local governments.

SCOD focuses more on philosophy and psychology than militant or religious preppers, because the hardest test of conventional friendship or survival during an emergency is living with people. Knowing how to get basic needs met is critical, including during the most likely emergency scenarios (natural disaster, pandemic, or war); so that comes first. Once you know where to get your food, water, and shelter; the scod design method of infinite combinations will be based on access flow diagrams (see ‘SCOD Thesis’ for examples). SCOD does not encourage everyone to collect guns or have the same religion, because freedom and peace are mainly to be encouraged without force. Diversity of martial and work training, with healing arts and cultural beliefs are the core of scod negotiations, and the spices for the flavor of life.

Working and planning with all kinds of people does not need to be permanent. Diverse experience does not need to be a risky investment, it can best be achieved with limited projects with cooperative practice. The purpose of tests and exercises are to determine what works, and what does not for those involved. Dedication and trust are earned over time, and we simply cannot be dedicated to trusting everything in every way. We learn what is reasonable to expect with wisdom by trial and error, and we learn our own limits for negotiations. If there is no reason to invest in an unstable situation, it is wise to move on.   

If the factors work well they will, but there are so many possible scenarios that those who enjoy the joy of design and writing can explore possible plans without the costs of construction. We make do with what we have, and when we need more we can get it with will-power. The factors of design are as important to scod life as the basic elements they are based on, because scod design theory is a religion of architecture in that it should remind us the purpose of possessing, sharing, and maintaining structures and spaces. Exploring scod design theory is possible even if we never find the best possible factors with serious partners, and this point is the power of imagination. We can dream and be creative even if we have serious mental disabilities, physical disabilities, or are in prison or under quarantine. Enjoy yourself, scod.

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Playing With War Wisdom

Posted in Creativity / Imagination, Military, Psychology, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on September 28, 2019 by Drogo

On Playing with Toy Soldiers and Playing Army

Pretending to send others to their deaths and kill them as pawns in a game, over and over while eventually caring about them as individuals with personal dreams, made me mentally a veteran by my teens. By the time i joined the military i felt i had already thought through life and death decisions that most would never shed a tear over. So when i cried about simple authoritarian issues, despite being able to follow and give orders and act like a silly robot, most of my fellow soldiers had no way to know the depth of my thoughts about a system i could not change even if i was a general. The struggle of constant war is insane, and many wars are in vain.

Playing with toy soldiers is not as silly as the reality of war. Playing might be a silly action, but it is simply a mode of being, it does not ‘make us silly’; but the real truth is that military armies make all of human history seem silly and a waste of life, on par with slavery. Slaves and soldiers have done great things, but the paradox that they existed at all is troubling from any kind of moral or ethical position. the joy of playing war or play fighting, is similar to the crazed glee of an actual war monger; which is more ridiculous?? the power to send humans to their death willingly is a great thrill. Even more so is the feel of victory after having slaughtered others. For this reason no civilized people should keep a standing army during peace times, which should be far longer than times of war; lest they begin to create their own enemies for the sake of perpetuation.

What each of us learns from conflict is up to us; just as with real fights, battles, and war. Hitler did not learn from WW1 to stop trying to hurt people, and may have never learned the wisdom of peace. Yet some learn without having to attack anyone. [ Recording of this essay ]

 

 

 

House On The Rock – Wisconsin Architecture

Posted in Alternative Architecture, Memorials / Obituaries / Epitaphs, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 18, 2012 by Drogo

Villa Saint Francis of Deer Shelter Rock

Casa Del Roche

Little Switzerland

Castle Island In the Sky

Alex Jordan Jr. was the chief artist, architect, poet, master builder, owner, pioneer, innovator, and creative driving force behind the marvelous architectural wonder known as ‘House on the Rock’ in Wisconsin. The idea began around 1920 when his father, Alex Sr., was returning from a visit with Frank Lloyd Wright (FLW) where Wright had insulted Jordan’s designs without bothering to be polite. You see, the Jordan family had been fans of FLW since they lived near one of his houses, and Alex Sr. had been building the house of their dreams called “Villa Maria”. Alex Sr. had probably not expected someone that he respected and admired to be so personally rude to him. So Alex Sr. was understandably mad at FLW, and swore to put a house on the rocks nearby that would spitefully compete with FLW’s Taliesin, his architectural style, and perhaps most of all…his titanic and competitively selfish ego.

In 1945 Alex Jr. had been turned down for service in the US Military because of a heart condition, so he began camping, drinking, picnicking, entertaining, blasting dynamite, building, and hauling mortar and masonry up to the site for the House on Deer Shelter Rock. After 15 years of work, around 1960, Jordan was satisfied enough with the construction to formally advertise and open it to the public for tours. House on the Rock was written up in newspapers and magazines, and became a self-funded tourist attraction. As a true work of art, the house would never be ‘finished’ during Jordan Jr.’s life, and continued to grow.

During the 1960’s the Main House, Gate House, and Mill House opened and introduced collections of curiosities and antiques. In the 1970’s the buildings for ‘Streets of Yesterday’ and ‘Music of Yesterday’ opened. In the 1980’s ‘Carousel Room’, ‘Organ Room’, and ‘Infinity Room’ opened. Alex Jordan Jr. died in 1989. A year after his death, the ‘Heritage of the Sea Room’ and ‘Discovery Center’ opened in 1990.

The entire site is so immense and such a dense labyrinth, that no description can take the place of actually personally experiencing the complex. Alex Jordan Jr. may have shied away from personal fame, but by building the ‘House On The Rock’ for the public he also achieved a public immortality that few people achieve. He was a creator that never stopped building, collecting, and making art, architecture, and artifacts to share with other people. Alex Jordan Jr. may not have finished making additions to ‘House On The Rock’, but he did complete and surpass his father’s dream in the process of his life’s work.

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