Archive for internet

Facebook is Dysfunctional

Posted in Commercial Corporations, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Multimedia Communication, Services, Sales or Trade, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on April 7, 2017 by Drogo

It isn’t just people with problems, the design of Facebook is dysfunctional. 

Facebook is a clever concept, and works ok to connect people from around the World. However there are always many glitches in the programming, unnecessary updates that confuse more than help users, and few options for user control over the format. Many of the important utility icons are stupidly tiny, disproportionate with their function. The feed-streams and advertising are needlessly over animated, which creates loading glitches and mistakes. Facebook is poorly designed and has problems.

Rather than helping artists to make money, they ban the accounts of anyone pushing socially-acceptable boundaries. The best part of Facebook besides the basic operations, might be the easy way in which money transfers work. However there should be more ways for people to make money online, if only the 1% would create some jobs that we could do for them on Facebook (not holding breath). It is very difficult to get attention for personal independent advertising, even when you pay for it; and it is rare to get paying clients through Facebook (in my experience).

Worst of all about the design is that there are many ways to cause problems with other people’s accounts, like accusing them of ‘copyright’ or ‘nudity’ violations; both of which favor mega-corporations rather than individuals; AND no good way to defend the accused against the claims, while the accused are immediately judged and punished without trial (banned from posting, items deleted, threatened that account will be removed, and/or account disabled).

Facebook, as much as any media bound by laws, plays a role in censoring society because so many people use it. Facebook (FB) has chosen to punish people on their own pages for artistic expression, while the company reaps profit from ads. FB is part of the authoritative narrative that maintains that female nipples are obscene, and all human bodies in their natural state should be shamed. Human genitals that are responsible for giving us LIFE itself, are banned; as FB encourages society to continue to consider our sacred parts rude, offensive, and inappropriate for public knowledge or art.

The women of Pussy Riot and Femen are protesting in Europe more shockingly than in America, ironically because they have less freedom and less legal rights. Women in America have become complacent because they have largely bought into the commercial corporate male model of society. Those European martyrs are exposing their vulnerable bodies, shouting with their fragile voices, and putting their spirits in danger because we live in authoritarian state-run societies. Societies (as a whole) in Civilization evolve as cultures change through-out Time, and are influenced by those willing to defy traditions or conventions; often at the expense of their own safety.

The small text size in pop-up screens makes it very difficult to write significant messages to people. FB works best as a simple superficial message sharing commercial service, but it is barely adequate in message functionality, and fails to allow free expression by the user on their own pages. Artists have a difficult enough time in society, without being told they cannot show their own work on their own virtual page if FB or anyone else disapproves of it.

In protest of these problems I am going to start using other platforms more. Perhaps another form of social-media will help citizens to communicate better and share their lives and work without as much commercial intervention. Slowly society will grow and progress towards harmony with Nature and our own natural nudity. Diaspora and blogs seem to be a better way for free expression.  Democracy Cannot be Corporate.

Wowven Breasts

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Internet Nasty Comments

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization with tags , , , , , , , on December 27, 2012 by Drogo

Negative Comments Online

Negative comments are like pieces of shit, they stink and most people are capable of producing them regularly; so we should treat them as such and bury them, or flush them down the toilet of our minds. It is also good to be self-reflective, and if the evidence is over-whelming that we deserve the negative comments, then perhaps there is some use to make sure the waste becomes compost. If you already have compost, and rich enough soil, you do not need to worry about the negative feedback.

It is easy to say “do not let it get to you” or “dont worry about it”. It is harder for me to take that advice. I will attempt to explain why, although i admit it may be a waste of my time, when i could be sleeping and it is 3 AM as usual.

I have gotten some random nasty comments when i publish online, and i think i make to much of them, but then again i make to much of everything i guess. I cannot simple ignore insults, even when it is clear the person does not care about me. Perhaps it is precisely that they do not care, that gives it almost as much significance as those that do care. Such insults are false because they are hollow, insubstantial. Yet it is the void that wounds me, or rather that i wound myself with. When they tell me “get a life” i think about it, and start to argue “i think i have a life, actually”. Perhaps it is also because it is the only comment i get on something, and often no one but that asshole cared enough to write anything, at the time i checked in (be it when everyone else is sleeping and i cannot). I am not sure.

I have not taken the time to address such negative comments at any length (until now), as i am not sure how much attention should be given to people that want to harm others that are not harming them or anyone else. My usual way of handling offensive comments, or at least my first impulse as a fighter, is to lash out at them, and try to hurt them worse than they hurt me (or at least as much). Naturally, this is what they want, as they are self-destructive in their offensive arrogance (asking for a fight). I think i could write a book on the subject, in attempts to come to terms with it, perhaps then it would not bother me so much. Nah.

I will just try to shut them out, and focus my own energy.

– Drogo Empedocles on idiots

 

 

 

 

 

SCOD related links

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 17, 2012 by Drogo

These internet links often have nothing to do with SCOD officially, but are related by subject matter and common interest.

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Greenhouse Effect, the definition

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenhouse_effect

People 4 Social Sustainability (P.S.S.), Where do we stand?

http://www.sustainablecoop.org/westand.html

Homesteading and Survivalism Store

http://homesteadingsurvivalism.myshopify.com/

Natural Remedies

http://www.naturalremedies.org/

Circle Sanctuary

http://www.circlesanctuary.org/ministries/interfaith/

Claymont Society, Property, and Community

http://www.claymontseminars.com/

Earth Architecture

http://www.eartharchitecture.org/index.php?%2Fcategories%2F52-United-States%2FP2.html

Earth First!

http://www.earthfirst.org/

Rainbow Gatherings

http://welcomehome.org/rainbow/

Bushcraft USA  http://bushcraftusa.com/forum/forum.php

Society for Creative Anachronism

http://www.sca.org/

Witch’s Bookshop

http://witchbookstore.blogspot.com/

Green Guide

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SCOD Fallout 2020 Film

http://sites.google.com/site/stowellgalleries/scodgreenhouse/scodfallout

SCOD Members

http://sites.google.com/site/stowellgalleries/scodmembers

 

SCOD Greenhood videos

http://www.youtube.com/user/SCODgreenhood

SCOD Virtual Vault

http://sites.google.com/site/stowellgalleries/libraryvault

SCOD Architecture Thesis

http://sites.google.com/site/stowellgalleries/thesisintro

SCOD Homepage

http://www.scodpub.com

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more will be added later…. ongoing collection….

Environmental Websites

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Environmentalism, SCOD Thesis with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 11, 2011 by Drogo

Green Architecture and related Eco-theme sites

Inhabitat Blog Magazine

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(article ongoing)

 

 

 

Buddhists Online

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Critical Commentary of Civilization with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 11, 2010 by Drogo

Published article by Laura Busch

Iran, Burma & Global Cybersanga by Laura Busch

Socially engaged Buddhism has gone online. Or rather, we have gone online as socially engaged Buddhists. Yet, there are those who may cringe at the idea. One can easily find on the Internet rampant materialism, and new methods of communicating human anger and ignorance such as cyberbullying, flaming and spamming. So is the Internet truly a beneficial technology for promoting social justice and activism? And if so, how do we use this technology to benefit sentient beings?

Iran: Internet democracy or repression?

Scholars studying social activism and the Internet have offered many answers to these types of questions. While the Internet can be effectively used for social justice, it can equally be a tool of surveillance and censorship. This duality was apparent during the 2009 election in Iran, where angry citizen used Twitter to organize protests against the government. Protester cell phones captured and posted videos of these events, which eventually made their way to news agencies like BBC and CNN. At the same time, the Iranian government used the very same technology to seek out, arrest, and torture protesters. As we can see, the Internet can be as much of a liberating technology as a technology of control.

The Digital Divide

Furthermore, other factors can inhibit the Internet’s effectiveness as a tool for alleviating suffering. One of these factors is the “digital divide”: a disparity of internet access within and between countries. These disparities are generally based upon differences in geography, income, age and education, often resulting in a lack of internet access amongst impoverished populations. This lack of access can also result in perpetuating social inequality.

Yet, despite these important issues, the Internet does appear to have greater potential as an effective tool for activism than previous communication technologies like television. The Internet is a unique in that it allows people to instantly connect to other like-minded individuals, find information, and make their voices heard. It can be a platform where local marginalized voices, that have previously been silenced, can reach the global public and express their needs.

Constructing Global Cybersanga

So how can we effectively use this technology to educate and promote social justice in an increasingly connected global world? First, we must not view ourselves as solitary web users, but as members of an online community of concerned Buddhist practitioners. Therefore, I posit the following, seemingly simplistic statement: messages matter. The stories we tell online about belonging to a global socially engaged Buddhist community, are a central first step to creating and sustaining positive, real world, social changes. These stories provide our individual lives with a sense of shared community concerns and goals and we can use Web sites, discussion forums, and social networking sites like Facebook as spaces where these stories can flourish and develop.

One powerful story of online global Buddhist community is the cybersangha. Cybersanghas appear in many forms: from Web sites like Buddhanet and the Buddhist Channel, to discussion forums like E-sangha. These sites, and many others, share a vision of a global, socially engaged Buddhist community: a community of spiritual friends that share certain systems of belief, practices and religious stories with the purpose of benefitting all sentient beings.

Cybersangha Mobilizes for Burma

Cybersanghas can have far-reaching, real world implications in terms of helping sentient beings. When we see ourselves as a part of a global sangha, we identify with others in our sangha, their hopes, dreams, trials, and tribulations. We care when members of our global sangha are suffering and we become motivated to act when our community demands action. This power of community stories was evident during the 2007 protests in Burma. In one global Buddhist discussion forum, many members identified the monks as spiritual brothers in the community. While there were some debates about whether monks should be protesting, the majority of forum members shared online news and expressed their support and desire to help, often saying to one another, “I need to do something. What can I do?”

And it is this crucial moment, when we see ourselves as part of a community and see our community’s values as necessitating certain forms of social engagement that we become motivated to act. When members of the message board asked, “What can I do”, others responded with links to online petitions, Web sites that supported democracy in Burma, and lists of rallies, protests and vigils taking place around the world. The Internet provided a space where these opportunities could be shared and discussed: where the community mobilized others to act. And those online who were concerned with Burma, mobilized quickly, collaborated with other groups, and events in Burma were known around the world.

Conclusion

While messages and technology go hand in hand to produce effective social engagement, we must also use the Internet to form partnerships with those outside of our community. Our actions are most effective when we collaborate with other religious communities, non-profits, universities and any other organization or community that shares the same goals. This is also what makes the internet a powerful tool for successful engagement: we can quickly find and contact others who align with our values and ideals. We can use the Web to build partnerships, and through these partnerships, the results of our compassionate actions are amplified.

Despite the digital divide and government attempts to control the Internet, digital technologies are becoming more accessible in the world and with it, greater opportunities are available to connect and collaborate with other socially engaged Buddhists. The internet has become central to how we connect our local concerns to the global world. Yet, it is important to remember that in the end, it is the people who use the Internet that must move from thinking of oneself as a socially engaged Buddhist, to acting upon the opportunities we encounter online to be socially engaged: to use the Internet with compassion rather than indifference.