Archive for kids

To The Children of the Future

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization, Environmentalism, Organic Development, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on March 27, 2017 by Drogo

I am sorry that we of Generation X have not done more to preserve our Nature Environment. Yes we participated in protests, and various activist roles, but we have been largely apathetic as a whole, and the grip that the Baby-Boomer Generation has had on government has not lessened. Their corporate corruption certainly set the stage for Trump and his ilk. There was even talk among our revolutionaries of assassinating all the demagogues, but that did not seem reasonable to do on a weekend.

Instead of acting on our angst and over-throwing the system in order to replace with with real democracy, we instead spent our money (what little we could make in a diminishing economy) on movies and video games, preparing the way for the autism of Millennials. Ass-bergers is not to blame for the pollution of our water, land, and air; no the fault belongs to apathy and ignorance. I honestly thought that Rambo and Commando would solve all our problems through the kicking the ass of every enemy. Well we certainly helped accomplish global destruction of nature, as well as humans, through our aggression and belligerence. The shells of wasted ammo pile high, and the smog from spent fuel hangs heavy in the air. The smell of burning oil wells is our generation’s new ‘napalm in the morning’.

Cities have poisoned their own water supplies, corporations have waged wars on workers, and yet we still allow terrible, evil people to control our lives and ruin your future. I am sorry my children, I would have liked to have more green spaces for you to enjoy for quality of life, and technology for you to use for renewable energy. And yet we are developing every square foot of our country by paving over it, and building wasteful architecture. I have quite serving that system, to the best of my ability, and I fight against it, peacefully as much as I can. For you and me, I pledge I will never stop the struggle to allow us to thrive with nature, responsibly, and most of all for you because I love you.

– Drogo Empedocles

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The Secret of Childhood by Maria Montessori

Posted in Education / Schools, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 4, 2016 by Drogo

Book report on The Secret of Childhood by Maria Montessori (1966 version)

Learning how to enjoy learning by asking questions, and liking what you do; not just doing what you want or are told to do.

Content Summary

Childhood: A Social Problem

Era of the Child; Psycho-analysis secret

Newborn Child – Alien Environment, Natural Instincts, Spirit Incarnation

Psychic Development – sensitive periods, observations

Order – Inner / Outer

Intelligence, Growth, Sleep, Walking, Rhythm, Movement, Comprehension, Love

Montessori Method Origins

Normalization

Deviation – pampering, fugues, barriers, cures, attachment, possessive, power, fear, truth

Conflict – adult vs child

Instinct to Work

Guiding, Teaching, Rights, Mission

Conventional ‘direct teaching’ impedes child learning, based on the erroneous assumption that teaching molds young minds. The will-power of the child to create their own skills (walking, talking, eating, etc), is how children learn. Children have the power to change their own behavior, and are more successful when it is self motivated. The key is to determine where teaching and self-motivation meet in each case.

Children will notice with frustration, that they are considered unreliable and weak compared to less fragile adults. This dissociative relationship between the helpless child and their environment causes children to think of themselves as hopelessly inferior, and combined with social competition makes them desperate for attention and constant continuing dissatisfaction as they grow. In many ways this conditions people to be fighters and survivalists, which are certainly strong roles; and is naturally similar to resistant forces that cause a tree to grow denser and shorter if there are high winds, or thin and tall with little wind. However there is a problem with children viewing themselves as less valuable than the objects they are forbidden to touch, as without self worth, they have nothing to lose by hurting themselves or others.

If a child is to develop their own interior life, they must be allowed to touch things, and work rationally; as this can help them early on to develop considerate habits of acting. They must develop ethics by their own free-will, although we can guide them. Establishing sustainable successions of working actions, based on rational play, is successful education.

Montessori Notes

Posted in Education / Schools, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 22, 2016 by Drogo

My mother was my Montessori teacher. In addition to these notes, i have reported on these books: Montessori Revolution,  Absorbent Mind, and  Secret of Childhood. – Drogo

American Montessori Society Bulletin  1979 – vol.17, No.1

Piaget and Montessori In The Classroom – by David Elkind, Tufts University

“Classroom practice, of whatever variety, presupposes a particular conception of the child. In this chapter, four components of Piaget’s and Montessori’s conception of the child are described, together with examples of the sort of educational practice that follows from them.”

Elkind goes on to explain 2 different methods of teaching, by referencing 2 different classrooms where children were using the ‘pink tower’ blocks incorrectly. In one case the teacher corrected the children, and in the other they allowed the play. In theory, he said, both are justified.

Child as capable of self-regulation – learning materials tap mental potential

Child as a cognitive alien – they think different than adults, like foreigners

Child as a logical thinker – young people use logic to make decisions

Child as emotional countryman – they have adult emotions that affect behavior

Summary

The first task of the teacher is to observe children, then let that inform how you teach them. It is the teacher’s conception of the child, which in the end, determines the nature of the teacher-child affective interaction using specific methods and techniques. Do not assume what children know or understand, because everyone is different in their awareness, development, and rationality. Respect for children is important, so that they can begin to emulate respect for teachers, others, and themselves. Teaching should be guided by these factors.

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Children Learn in Different Ways

Proceedings, American Montessori Society

1975, Granby Colorado

Learning As Creation, by John Bremer

Child Development, by J.M. Hunt

Montessori Day Care Panel

Kephart Development Model, by Nancy Miles

Gellner Rationale of Learning Disabilities, by Ward and Haise

Organizations Serving Young Children

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Learning As Creation, by John Bremer

Dr. John Bremer founded ‘School-Without-Walls’, Parkway Program, Cambridge

Bremer starts off with a joke about how he once stood up in front of people, and his pants did not. He says “as long as you’ll remember my pajama bottoms all the way through, then I guess I won’t feel too embarrassed about what I say.” Then he proposes a role for the student, as an artist. The artist should understand ‘three essential elements’: material, ideal, and skill. Bremer says that ‘temporal arts’ have a strong presence in time. Songs, music, and dance are temporal arts; you do not “see it before yours eyes as a totally finished thing. You experience it through time.” Temporal arts are more of a ‘process’, than they are an complete object. Bremer says that human beings are more dancers than sculptors, in how they live their lives. “Everything is a rehearsal, and yet everything is the only performance we will ever give. In that way it is incredibly beautiful and also incredibly frightening.” Students should be considered with the humane respect that we might give an adult artist; they are people. He considers the term ‘student’ to be almost equal to ‘artist’. Student = Artist. Teaching means introducing the student to materials, ideals, and skills. School is an activity, not a place; but the structure of a building does matter, as architecture affects learning. Psychological disposition is inherent in education, we all have our own ways or styles of teaching and learning. The student should ‘recreate the wheel’ to be the master of technology, rather that its slave. Also moral responsibility should be introduced by the teacher, so they do not create a ‘Frankenstein’ situation. One way of introducing morality, is to create community, as a bridge between society and individuals. Community to him meant people coming together and cooperatively carrying out common purposes. “We will never all be dancing, we will never all be still.” We dance with others to share love and friendship.

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Child Development, by J.M. Hunt

Dr. Hunt, Professor Emeritus of Psychology from University of Illinois

Plasticity is important in early psychological development. Intelligence should no longer be limited by predetermined training, but be allowed to expand and flourish with imaginative experiences. Education is important in the process of learning rules, and but to also think beyond the ‘box’. Piaget described the sensory motory phase as a kind of ‘shell game’. The child develops in progressive sequences, or steps.

Hunt goes on to address Head Start, IQ, vocab, and verbal tests and ages. IQ is not fixed, it fluctuates through-out a person’s life-time. 7 ordinal scales: object construction, strategy means (schemes), imitation gesture (physical), vocal imitation (tonal), operational causality, object relations, object relation. Branches of learning can develop at different rates, this is natural; in accordance with genetics and circumstances like environmental nurturing, social effects, and local area situations. The problem of ‘the match’ is how an equilibrium between stages of development can be key to complex phases of child education. When cognition is lacking, motivation is necessary; as found in The Secret of Childhood, by Montessori. Like the Pavlovian ‘What is it?’ reflex; change of habituated input, recognitive familiarity, and the challenge of ‘old-vs-new’ attraction stimuli all matter greatly. Observe, create, and make sure you are free to adapt your methods in order to teach better.

Maria Montessori: Her Life and Work

Montessori Mother, by Dorothy Fisher

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Montessori Day Care Panel

reported by Janice Sullivan

Children’s House, Broomfield, Colorado

Integrating Montessori into Public Education – existing materials, introduce practical life area, order Montessori materials, regroup into groups of 30 children (max), maintain order, demonstrate activities. Varies local services were addressed. A ratio of non-Montessori staff and aides are allowed.

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Kephart Developmental Model

Nancy Miles, NC KGH Achievement Center, Fort Collin, CO

Systems and Structures – The total environmental concept: the home, school, community, peer group; all play a part in shaping a child’s behavior, through demands for response or interaction. Kephart Child Development Theory of Stages of Learning: motor, motor-perceptual, perceptual-motor, perceptual, perceptual-conceptual, conceptual-perceptual. Audition, Vision, and Kinesthesia should be integrated.

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Gellner Rationale of Learning Disabilities, by Ward and Haise

This article criticizes the Gellner approach, but talks about how it is compatible with other systems. It is a neuro-psychological concept of mental retardation, which includes some useful tools for training students that may not be able to fully understand conventional topics. Gellner said that children who are classed as retarded, mainly have brain impairments of either a structural or bio-chemical character. These impairments prevented normal integration of impulses coming from various parts of the body. Senses play a very important part in our learning. Gellner came up with 4 sensory neural systems: 2 involve vision, and 2 involve audition. Mentally retarded children cannot learn in the same ‘normal’ ways, because they suffer from sensory deprivation.

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Organizations Serving Young Children

Reported by Jim Hennes

The panel concluded that the session had been important in pulling together these representatives, and that future efforts should be made to share some time together among organizations.

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Montessori Quotes

“Education demands only this: the utilization of the inner powers of the child for his own instruction.”

“The essence of the independence is to be able to do something for one’s self.”

“A child’s work is to create the person they will become. An adult works to perfect the environment, but a child works to perfect them-self.”

“Development comes from environmental experience.”

To have learned something is, for a child, only a point of departure. What is necessary after that is a period of digestion or maturation, a period of intense and prolonged mental activity.”

“The more fully the needs of one period are met, the greater will be the success of the next.”

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“Teacher, teacher look at me now,

my days are light, my time is right

because you showed me how.

Teacher teacher look what I can do

my lines are straight, they are perfect mates

across the paper blue.

and if you’ll hold my hand

I’ll skip the land and gather flowers new –

hey teacher, teacher, look at me now

just look what I can do.”

– Anon

 

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Historic Paganism and Human Sacrifice

Posted in History, Pagan, Religions with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 5, 2013 by Drogo

Ancient writers were always accusing enemy cultures of evil deeds. This type of propaganda is still used today, as evident with main-stream news networks. While the ancients made many factual detailed accounts, there is no doubt that as humans they were just as fallible to influences as we are today. Historians today seem unable to cite any substantial archeology to defend the Greek, Roman, or Jewish claims that their enemies conducted mass human sacrifices; at least by our traditional literal definition of Satanic ritual human sacrifice. There is no conclusive evidence regarding human sacrifice in Celtic or Canaanite history, anymore than in early Greek, Roman, or Jewish history.

Rumors about enemies executing criminals, assisted suicides, or cremation of dead bodies were easily labeled simply as ‘sacrifice’ because rituals were overseen by priests. These manipulated rumors were spread by a few select literate sources to an already biased audience ignorant about barbarian culture. With no counter-culture period writings, we cannot believe the accusing texts at surface value, despite the appearance of fairness due to some compliments or rhetorical claims.

Sacrificing human lives during a war or battle certainly happened, and continues to happen in military conflicts and secular fights today. There are religious aspects to conflict sacrifices, but are more related to fighting, war, and secular killing in general. Conflict sacrifice deserves its own essay; regarding suicide, decapitation, cannibalism, and other practices before, during, and after fighting or hunting.

The Hebrew Torah references human child sacrifice in ancient Egypt, Israel, & Canaan. When the Torah mentions child sacrifice in terms of the first born sons of Israel, it is considered an acceptable metaphor, or symbolic ritual rite of passage into religious service. Curiously the Torah does not make a detailed account of Hebrew child sacrifice when Moses says “’With a mighty hand the LORD brought us out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery. When Pharaoh stubbornly refused to let us go, the LORD killed every firstborn in Egypt, both man and animal. This is why I sacrifice to the LORD the first male offspring of every womb and redeem each of my firstborn sons’.” – Exodus 13:14

I believe by the time of Moses, most cultures that practiced human sacrifice had a concept of sacrifice as a ‘tax payment’ to a higher authority. In Israel they ‘sacrificed’ their first born sons to the higher authority of the Jewish Temple Priests, in the name of God. In Canaan they ‘sacrificed’ their children to the higher authority of the Babylonian Temple Priests of Ba’al. Canaanite rituals probably included rites-of-passage where their youth passed through sacred flames (fire baptism), as existed in many other cultures from Egypt to America. First born sons were sacrificed by parents, meaning they gave them over to the priests in the service of a Temple. In Egypt the lambs’ blood on the doors meant that they had already sacrificed lambs to God, so they did not owe him their sons. This trade of sacrifice is known as Consecrated Redemption, which is described later in the Torah (Numbers 3:49).

In modern times we do use the term ‘sacrifice’ when describing military service, and patriotic parents accept this sacrificial concept of duty to the nation. We also use the word ‘sacrifice’ when following strict religious restrictions; giving up one thing for another higher blessing. My argument is that the origins of our modern definition of ‘sacrifice’ was possibly started during the time of Abraham, when God told him he could sacrifice a lamb instead of his son. By the time of Moses, sacrifice (even human sacrifice), meant trading one valuable asset to an authority, to insure the blessing of another. So when the Torah refers to sacrifice, it is referring to the established traditional ritual metaphor.

The ritual metaphor of human sacrifice relating to death, was often over-emphasized as political propaganda for their intended audience. It is much easier to reject the practices of others, if we believe them to be repulsive. Sacrificing sons (giving money to priests) may have been a tax on the parents for being able to keep their child; as with livestock God demands a sacrifice, but you can exchange one animal for another, or the monetary equivalent. In the New Testament Jesus was worth sacrificing a dove to the Temple. Jesus later became the ultimate human sacrifice when he died for our sins, so that no one needed to give sacrifices to the Temple anymore, because he said through him we can ask God directly for forgiveness, and he paid the price of sin for all. This was very popular with poor people, since they often could not afford the price of sacrifices. Also the sacrifice tax may have been intended as population control.

Another problem with biblical terms, is that Canaanites and Israelites were ethnically similar by the Second Temple period (Job 40:30, Proverbs 31:24). In archaeological and linguistic terms, the kingdoms of Israel and Judah were a subset of Canaanite culture. The disdain for Canaanites in the Torah was related to the semantic use of the word Canaanite as a synonym for merchant or trader who does business with Babylon. Clearly the Jewish Temple Priests did not like outside religious influence, as it was threatening their power and diminishing their sacrifice (tax) income.

Regarding literal historical Pagan human sacrifice by American Aztec Priests, and some Native Asian Islander cannibalism, there is more evidence that they actually did kill many humans to appease the gods or gain their powers. Despite this fact, human sacrifice is not mandated by main-stream Neo-Pagans today in any form. Human sacrifice for salvation is generally rejected by New-Age ideology, as salvation typically comes from within and is achieved through self-realization, without the need to contribute to an institution or higher authority. Most people do not like to pay taxes anyway.

christ recycles