Archive for man

Incredible Hulk Psychology

Posted in Cartoon Comics, Fictional Characters, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2019 by Drogo

Incredible_Hulk_Vol_1_273

This essay is from a SCOD video on the Marvel Hulk comic-books. Is the system working for you? Do you work for the system? Do you have a balance?? Dr. Banner worked within the nuclear science field, and was cursed with the alter-ego of the Hulk after a gamma-bomb test radiation accident. The main over-arching human theme of the ‘System vs Individuals’ originated because the military industrial complex created the Hulk, and Banner uses technology to handle his Hulk problem, but he is always chased by the military as a terrorist because the The Incredible Hulk was very aggressively anarchist libertarian (in effect by savage nature, not due to political ideology) due to his resistance to authority and desire to be left alone. In ‘Marvel: Five Fabulous Decades of the World’s Greatest Comics’Les Daniels addresses the Hulk as an embodiment of cultural fears of radiation and nuclear science. He quotes Jack Kirby: “As long as we’re experimenting with radioactivity, there’s no telling what may happen, or how much our advancements in science may cost us.” Daniels continues, “The Hulk became Marvel’s most disturbing embodiment of the perils inherent in the atomic age.”

The main character core theme for individual psychology is obviously anger (but also fear) as one part of the aggressive/passive dichotomy paradigm; because anger is the main catalyst for his change, and calmness allows the beast to sleep within him again. A third theme might be danger/safety (violence/gentleness), survival regardless of emotions. A fourth theme could be the stoic sadness of living with guilt and responsibility for problems. Humans are animals, but we seek to control our id, ego, and emotions for the sake of society and civilization. The Hulk deals with debates about man and monster, where does one personality end and the other begin??  Oddly enough, his rage doesn’t make him evil or the antagonist in the story. Can he be both a hero and an anti-hero?? Originally the Hulk transformed at night (1962), then randomly. It was not until after about the 30th comic book (1966) with Hulk in it [Tales To Astonish #80], that ANGER became his main catalyst for transformation. Hulk influenced popular culture so much, that the term ‘hulk out’ means to get enraged and rampage. “Don’t make me angry; you won’t like me when I’m angry.” – Dr. Banner (TV show)

Dr. Banner is a scientist dealing with some serious mental issues. As he evolves, so does his monstrous manifestation. The egos of the various incarnations exist within Banner, as Banner exists within them. The metaphor being that our different personality aspects and phases of life exist within us. Who we ‘really are’ does not have to be limited to just one personality, or set of emotional responses. I actually cannot think of a depiction that does not consider them within each-other as they are obviously connected, even if they are also beings in their individual ways.

The Jekyll-Hyde story is not just about literal appearance differences; also about mental disorders and addiction, physical (chemical) and mental bi-polar and border-line… all kinds of things to think about with split-personality concepts (not the diagnosis but the reality of how emotions can be overly intense with many people, making them seem like different people when they experience them).

[More will be added later to this article, like illustrations of the Evolution of Hulk; and more story plot points and descriptions.]

Youtube video:  Incredible Hulk Comics 1970-1990

Youtube video:  Incredible Hulk fan tribute collage – ‘evolution montage’

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analysis of Apostles of Success

Posted in Book Reports, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Economics, History with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 15, 2013 by Drogo

Apostles of the Self-Made Man: Changing Concepts of Success in America

1965 book by John G. Cawelti – University of Chicago Phoenix Press – 280 pages

 Success

SUMMARY

This is a book about the popular culture of success in America. It discusses natural qualities of character, education, values, and needs of individuals and society. It is a decent American history of changing concepts of success; with a focus on three main sources: historic individuals, fictional figures, and manual guides. It uses literature as a source to reference social history.

In spite of their persistent devotion to the idea of success, Americans have differed greatly in the way they defined it. That is the subject of this book. – p.3

Though the self-made man wasn’t an American invention, Americans have cherished the notion of someone rising out of poverty and, through hard work and dedication, achieving at least a moderate amount of wealth and respect. Purely American icons such as Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson each wrote about the opportunity for anyone in a fluid American class system to grow through their own power towards a particular position in society. Yet, much like Abraham Lincoln in the tumultuous ante-bellum period and the Gilded Age’s robber barons, the self-made man appeared most notably in times of rapid change and transition . – C.1

Three Strands of American Success

  1. Religious – Protestant Work Ethic and pious morality

  2. Economic – wealth = success

  3. Complex Individual and Social Ethics and Dreams, often combining the first 2 stands

American society saw three main versions of the self-made man emerge in epitomizing the ideal of success. The first focused on a Protestant notion of “piety, frugality, and diligence” in fulfilling the duties of one’s occupation. This version suggested that a static, stable social order existed in which success was the attainment of respectability in this world and led to the assurance of salvation in the world to come. As strict Protestantism gave way to other, secular notions of success, this ideal began to fade away.

The second tradition placed a premium on a more economic emphasis of success. While the first focused on religious notions of grace and propriety, the second enlisted the purely lay qualities of aggressiveness, competitiveness, and forcefulness. As industrialization swept over the United States in the Gilded Age and beyond, people prescribed to this ideal of success beyond the scope of religion. The hierarchical structure of many new corporations demanded such qualities from their employees if they hoped to “climb the ladder of success.” The third type of success, was a combination of the former two; taking ethics and humility from religious loyalty, in an existential industrial work environment.

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For more of the report, click on the link here for SCOD Gallery Report with Chapter Links!

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Humans, Learning, and Art

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Philosophy with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 6, 2012 by Drogo

Humans

 

We are endowed with reason, memory, and imagination.

 

We express ourselves in more ways than other creatures.

 

We are driven by an urge to become a creator.

 

We are able to value and believe.

 

We explore, experiment, and discover solutions.

 

We use symbols more than other creatures.

 

Inherent in our nature is the need for happiness, harmony, comfort, love, and freedom.

 

To be happy we must become interesting to ourselves, and expressively act on it.

 

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Learning

 

We learn through senses, the more the better.

 

We learn when we feel our past / present actions are inadequate.

 

We learn when we believe that goals are worthy achievements.

 

Learning is aided by care, concern, respect, and compassion.

 

We do not all learn the same ways.

 

Two approaches to learning:  Pro-Active / Re-Active

 

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Art

 

Art will always have unique meaning to every individual.

 

Art is not only done by humans, but we would like to think it is exclusive to us.

 

Art can be a meaningful arrangement of symbols with materials.

 

Art can be creative, inventive, original, systematic, organic, and constructive.

 

Artistic meaning and values can be applied and used in many ways.

 

Artistic quality is subjective, and beauty is in the eye-of-the-beholder.

 

Art should be stimulating or calming.

 

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