Archive for medieval

The Ruin – Medieval Poem

Posted in History, Poems, Poems, Rhymes, Riddles, Pub Library, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on June 21, 2020 by Drogo

The Ruin” is an elegy in Old English, written by an unknown Dark Age author of the 8th or 9th century. It was published in the 10th century Exeter Book, a large collection of poems and riddles. The poem evokes the former glory of a ruined Roman city by juxtaposing the grand, lively past state with the decaying present. The section has a large diagonal burn from a kind of branding in the center of the page. The burn has rendered many parts of the script illegible. This is a possible reconstruction interpretation:

This masonry is wondrous; fates broke it
courtyard pavements were smashed; the work of giants is decaying.
Roofs are fallen, ruinous towers,
the frosty gate with frost on cement is ravaged,
chipped roofs are torn, fallen,
undermined by old age. The grasp of the earth possesses
the mighty builders, perished and fallen,
the hard grasp of earth, until a hundred generations
of people have departed. Often this wall,
lichen-grey and stained with red, experienced one reign after another,
remained standing under storms; the high wide gate has collapsed.
Still the masonry endures in winds cut down
persisted on, fiercely sharpened, fate honed
Nature she shoned and men atoned.
Thing of ancient skill worked
Thing of crusted mud fallen away
spirit mourned, put together keen-counselled
a quick design in rings, a most intelligent one bound
the wall with wire brace wondrously together.
Bright were the castle buildings, many the bathing-halls,
high the abundance of gables, great the noise of the multitude,
many a meadhall full of festivity,
until Fate the mighty changed that.
Far and wide the slain perished, days of pestilence came,
death took all the brave men away;
their places of war became deserted places,
the city decayed. The rebuilders perished,
the armies to earth. And so these buildings grow desolate,
and this red-curved roof parts from its tiles
of the ceiling-vault. The ruin has fallen to the ground
broken into mounds, where at one time many a warrior,
joyous and ornamented with gold-bright splendour,
proud and flushed with wine shone in war-trappings;
looked at treasure, at silver, at precious stones,
at wealth, at prosperity, at jewellery,
at this bright castle of a broad kingdom.
The stone buildings stood, a stream threw up heat
in wide surge; the wall enclosed all
in its bright bosom, where the baths were,
hot in the heart. That was convenient.
Then they let pour hot streams over grey stone.
under the vaulted roof and open sky,
until the ringed pool once hot,
grew weeds where the baths were.
Then is that ancient wonder gone?
Nay, here, that is a noble thing,
to the house, city, and castle ruin!

Old Saint Peter’s Basilica

Posted in Historic Architecture, Pub Library, Religions, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 1, 2020 by Drogo

The greatest case of Christian architectural evolution is the Constantinian Christian basilica of St. Peter in Rome, Italy. Roman Emperor Constantine had the original St. Peter’s Basilica built (320-360 AD) on the site of Nero’s Circus, to honor the tomb of St. Peter, respect other Christian martyrs, and honor Christianity as the new Roman religion. The adjective ‘old’ was only added after it was demolished in the Renaissance, to distinguish the current from the former building. Pagan Romans used basilicas as public meeting halls, and the architectural form began to change as Christians used it. Although St. Peter’s is still called a basilica (Pagan), it is a large church or cathedral (Christian). The Catholic Church reserves the word ‘cathedral’ for large churches held by bishops, but architecturally for the masses there is no distinction between a cathedral and a basilica. Papal (pope) coronations were held at the basilica, and in 800 AD Charlemagne was crowned emperor of the ‘Holy Roman Empire’ there. Soon after in 846 Saracens sacked and damaged the tombs and treasures.

Old St. Peter’s set an example for related cathedrals and thousands of smaller churches, which followed for hundreds of years and still continues today world-wide. It was a synthesis of assembly hall, temple, and villa. Old St. Peter’s held 4,000 worshipers inside, and thousands more outside in the atrium (akin to St. Peter’s Plaza today). The atrium was added later and had 5 doors (portas) in the gable wall leading into the nave. The atrium was called the “Garden of Paradise” during the Dark Ages. As a large colonnade courtyard plaza, the atrium served to filter  and shelter entry into the interior nave arcade. Atriums or plaza squares are similar to typical Roman villa interior courtyards with fountains or sculpture in the center; in this case a bronze pine-cone fountain and Vatican obelisk. The transition from narthex to nave matches the Roman traditional private upper-class family household altar or chapel and open atrium relationship. Early Christian domestic architecture linked worship with privacy not only because Christianity was illegal, but also because it was conventional to have religious (Pagan ancestor) shrines in homes. Pilgrims approached the atrium portico typically by the eastern stairs.

Old St. Peter’s exterior was fairly plain, and resembled what we would consider a large stucco-masonry barn, rather than a classical temple. This lack of architectural adornment reflected the decline of the Roman Empire and the simplicity of early Christianity, which would continue into the Dark Age that followed. Ironically the new St. Peter’s basilica was the first time the facade had classical pilasters, as the Renaissance revived the Pagan styles. Old St. Peter’s long nave main aisle was flanked symmetrically by four side aisles, and lit by clerestory windows. A great arch framed the entry view of the altar and vaulted apse beyond at the western end. The apse and altar combination with nave procession comes from a long line of imperial Pagan temples (Egyptian Hatshepsut Temple 1480 BC to Roman Leptis Magna Basilica 210 AD). The 100 marble columns were spolia taken from earlier pagan buildings. Old St. Peter’s was over 350 feet long, with a colored marbled transept making a T-shaped Latin cross. The gabled roof with wooden beams was 100 feet high along the ridge peak, and despite fires and thin walls lacking buttresses it lasted for over a thousand years. Old St. Peter’s design was like St. John Lateran’s Arch-basilica Cathedral, built around the same time in Rome. The Renaissance reconstructed basilica was designed by architects: Bramante, Raphael, Michelangelo, Sangallo, and Maderno. The new St. Peter’s is larger, and contains some relics of the old structure.

The nave arch had a mosaic of ‘Constantine and St. Peter’, presenting a model of the church to Christ. On the walls between windows were frescoes of Bible themes. Ghiberti and Vasari wrote that Giotto painted five frescoes which were “either destroyed or carried away from the old structure of St. Peter’s during the building of the new walls.” Some medieval relics survived reconstruction. From some descriptions and fragments, the Navicella atrium mosaic (1310) was recreated. It occupied the whole wall above the entrance arcade facing the courtyard. Matthew’s scripture (14:24) was the basis for the large medieval mosaic by Giotto. “After Peter came down out of the ship and walked on the water, he became afraid of the storm and began to sink. He called out to Jesus for help. Jesus caught him and reproved him for his lack of faith, and led him back to the ship, whereupon the storm stopped.” A standing Madonna and fragment of an Epiphany mosaic (circa 700) also survived; but many gold items, like Constantine’s Cross on the Tomb of St. Peter, were lost long ago.

Old St. Peter’s architecture is confirmed by archeology, historical written accounts, and archival drawings. The oldest depictions we have are from 4th century frescoes and 16th century architects before demolition and reconstruction. Excavations confirmed some of the writings and renderings. One of the written sources ‘Liber Pontificalis’ mentions the rumor that Constantine was urged by Bishop Silvester to build the basilica on the site of St. Peter’s grave, and make his coffin with layers of solid bronze with spiral ‘Solomonic’ columns. Its’ construction involved removing or relocating tombs and constructing an enormous foundation on an expanded hillside level-cut.

The turmoil in Rome from conversion to fall (300-500 AD) begins with the 2 main christian basilicas being built to try to appease the oppressed masses of protesters all over the empire who sympathized with the infamous Christian martyrs. It is easier to study the architectural language changes, because the politics was very culturally complex and hard to translate, other than to say it is always about power. Despite the old Roman Pagan authority being replaced from within by Christian Imperial authority, the city was sacked by Christian barbarian mercenaries and migrants (Visigoths and Vandals) for centuries (600-100). Finally even the basilicas were not safe against the last of the barbarians (Saxons, Vikings, and Saracens), until the Roman Church authority was supreme enough across European kingdoms to focus violence against the Eastern Empire and Jerusalem (again) with the Crusades (1100-1300). [dates circa nearest hundred]

 

Plan_of_Circus_Neronis_and_St._Peters1590-Alfarano_plan

Architecture in ‘The Name of the Rose’

Posted in Film Reviews, Historic Architecture, Recommendations & Tributes with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 27, 2020 by Drogo

RWU History of Architecture II – Irene Fatsea 1995

Architecture in ‘The Name of the Rose’ Film

In the movie adaptation of Umberto Eco’s novel ‘The Name of the Rose’, architecture plays an important role for the medieval tone and setting. The film director, Annaud, made every scene intense with “visual overkill”. Five scenes show the importance of architecture in relation to the plot and characters.

In the opening scene two monks are riding towards the monastery. The monastery is positioned atop a steep hill, amid deep valleys and snow capped mountains. The impressive medieval stone fortress architecture is foreboding, as the dark mass over-looks the two small travelers on the narrow path leading into the complex. The hulking gate portcullis is drawn up, and the two Franciscan monks are greeted by disturbed and grotesque Benedictine monastic residents. The resident host monks exaggerate physical and mental characteristics which are considered social defects. The two visitors are now held within the cold imposing ‘sanctuary’ enclosure of massive walls and imposing battlements. Although they should feel secure, the unsettling harsh structure creates an angst-filled atmosphere of fear.

Unity is present in the choir scene. There is an orderly placement of seats in long rows, and the acoustics allow for blissful escape from more mundane routines and problems. When the monks are not gathered in this space for spiritual singing, the harshness of real life returns. The choir seats are narrow wooden benches with ornate carvings, and the back rows are raised along both walls of the holy hall. Ribbed vaulting creates echoing acoustics. 

The scriptorium of the library is ordered like a modern office, with a system of desks like pews, all facing one direction. The desk orientation prevents conversation and directs attention to a leader. The scriptorium is filled with a multitude of books and manuscripts, and they work on them on the desks. The arrangement of desks is dictated also by rows of short, round pillars with gothic capitals. 

The catacombs are a dark reminder of the Christianity’s past. Human skulls are stacked in rows. The halls are dark and damp, with dreary decor. The heroes must make their way with torches, for no natural light enters these halls of the dead. The architecture is simple, crude, and random; with small coves in the walls to house remains of bodies.

The locked library is a labyrinth in the tower, and it is where the climax occurs. Piranesi and Escher designed scenes of similar mysterious and chaotic stairs, with seemingly impossible connections. Hexagonal rooms filled with books lead off in four directions, while the action bombards our senses. Staircases drape from the shafts of the tower, and each of them branches off into countless rooms; all of which are almost identical. There are puzzles to be solved with logic and education. The labyrinth represents the workings of the confused, twisted, and guarded medieval mind. When the library is burned, it shows how fragile and fleeting history can be, despite our attempts to preserve the past and learn from it in the present.

Romanesque and Gothic Architecture

Posted in Historic Architecture, Religions, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on November 15, 2017 by Drogo

Cathedral Architecture of the Middle Ages

Romanesque cathedrals were based on Roman basilica designs, with thick walls and high ceilings. Engineering innovations like Gothic arches, flying buttresses, and keystone vaulting allowed for higher and larger expanses. Stain-glass windows and sculptures were integral parts of Gothic style; Cathedrals had exterior demons and interior angels. Water spout sculptures were called gargoyles and grotesques were ornaments to ‘ward off evil’ in much the same way comedic caricatures and scary decoration do at traditional festivals like Halloween. By embracing cultural demons in some form, the stress of Sin has less power for some; while scaring others into obedience, lest they get captured by demons outside. The inner sanctum of the church was where God protects his followers.

Pub Business Plan

Posted in Economics, Pub Library, Victorian Tavern with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 7, 2013 by Drogo

So you want to open a Medieval, Victorian, or Fantasy Pub? So do I. Here is a step-by-step list of a typical business plan for opening a pub.

1.  Location, location, location. Town, County, State. Near a highway. Enough space, at a reasonable cost (low monthly fees: mortgage, lease, rent, utilities, etc.). Easy access Parking.

2.  Get a business license, liquor license, insurance, inspections, permit for a club, and whatever else is needed legally in that location.

3. Order enough beer, liquor, wine, and a few food items to last a month or two; always keep stocked, and sell it for more than you pay for it.

4.  Advertise locally, in print, and on-line; with proper signage.

5.  Have a reason for people to come and keep coming back; quality food & drink; affordable costs; membership dues or benefits that other places do not offer; atmosphere and special social scene.

6.  File proper income taxes; accounting for employees and sales.

7.  Deal with problems as a benevolent over-lord.

Sounds simple doesn’t it? So why has it not happened yet? The problems come with the initial start-up costs and rent. Even with a steady stream of patrons, there is no guarantee that sales will cover the cost to run the place; and that is the big gamble – the risk.

ArmoryPub5

Tofu Lizard Memoir 06

Posted in Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing with tags , , , , , on May 29, 2012 by Drogo

Journal Entry 06

Later that afternoon I met Cordite the Horse Master and Blacksmith. He had been fixing some utilities around back, in between chopping wood. The three of us played a knife throwing game, on a target board. Drogo assured me that my job working at the bar would be easy. I only had to serve basic food and drink like bread, crackers, soup, water, coffee, tea, and beer. Also there was no cash register, just a strong lock box that was chained to the bar, since tax was included in the prices, and prices were always rounded to the nearest dollar.

That night they showed me to my room in the Inn (end of the Tavern). A few other people passed through the doors, but I knew I had time later to meet everyone. Thanking Drogo and Cordite, I began unloading my pack. I felt quite safe and welcome at SCOD. There are few places in this world that I have been to where I felt so at home.

In the morning the call of the rooster woke me up. I followed the smell of breakfast back to bar at the Pub end of the Tavern. My bed at the Inn had been comfortable enough, and although my door was unlocked I knew my possessions would be safe. There were not enough strangers like me around to worry about, I mused. Things were going to be ok. I was finally reaching the conclusion that this was going to be the happiest time of my adult life, and leaving my old office job was truly the right thing for me to do after all.

*

Tofu Lizard Memoirs 05

Posted in Fictional Stories, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2012 by Drogo

Journal of SCOD Member Tofu Lizard – Entry 05

The Medieval Pub was very much like the drawings on the website. Heavy timber-frame, with mixes of half-timber infill, scale-shingle siding, and masonry. Mostly earth colors. The Pub commanded a view of the whole site from atop the hill, as the road wound up to it. I introduced myself, and the people outside told me to go on in. Every visible structure and material was hand-crafted. The heavy wooden door creaked as I opened it and went inside. There was a tavern bar on the right, tables and more public rooms on the left, and a fireplace hearth straight ahead.

“How can I help you?” the Bar Keep asked.

“Hi, im new here. My name is Tofu Lizard.” I said.

“Ah well, met. I am Drogo.” he said.

Drogo offered me a free drink of water in a goblet, with a flagon beside it, should I want more. He said that he was the architect and owner, besides acting as bar keeper. Drogo said he mostly manages the property, and other people usually work there. He generously offered me a job working at the Pub and as a field hand. SCOD would not pay me, but in exchange I got to live there for free, provided I worked my shifts, and I could still get tips and extra money on the side, if I sold my own crafts there.

*  [continued in Entry 6]

Sword Jump Wedding

Posted in Events / Celebrations, Pagan with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 1, 2012 by Drogo

Celtic Pagan Sword Leap Ceremony by Drogo Empedocles

ENTRANCE MUSIC – Procession

*

We are gathered here today to witness the wedding of _____ and _____,

and to help celebrate their marriage on this chosen day.

They have chosen to perform a sword ceremony,

where they must ‘jump the sword’.

The edge of the sword is symbolic of the possible dangers of love,

and jumping over it represents that they maintain their own ties to each-other,

during the perilous ‘leap of faith’ required for getting married.

*

I will now bless and lay the sword. Here is the sword!

Anál nathrach, orth’ bháis’s bethad, do chél dénmha

So mote it be, blessed be.

*

_____ do you take _____? _____ do you take _____?

Lord and Lady please hold hands.


For marriage you are headed!

Once over the sword,

for evermore you are wedded!

Now Leap Lord, and Jump Lady!

*

You have made the leap of faith together, and now you are married.

You may now kiss.

So mote it be, blessed be.

*

EXIT MUSIC

Eric Meulemans Interview

Posted in Interviews, Pub Library with tags , , , , , , , , , , on September 13, 2011 by Drogo

Name of Person interviewed: Sir Eric Meulemans

Reason interviewed: Pipedream Pub

1. Why did you start the Pipedream Pub:

The Pipedream Pub began – as many college-year endeavors do – as the mad hallucinations of a closely-knit group of friends, who desired to actualize their medievalist fantasies in the form of a Prancing-pony-like hangout where they would be free to eat hearty whole-grained breads, play eclectic music of all sorts at all hours, become learned beyond measure in artes arcane, use an abundance of hyphens and ellipses, and generally just hang out and be awesome with one another and perpetuate awesomeness upon the world.

Given the practical constraints of construction of such a physical reality, and, as so many such similar dreams are interrupted by that thing mortals call “life,” the Pipedream Pub lingered in a perpetual Pipedream state, waiting to be brought to fruition in its originally conceived form but over time evolving into much more. Rather than merely being a physical place, the Pipedream Pub became a virtual storehouse for the common interests and developments of its members, who seek to collect and disseminate knowledge for the betterment of those worthy of it.

2. Give some advice for anyone wanting to do what you have done:

Not to sound like a well-worn Nike slogan, but… just do it. If you desire something, pursue it. If you dream of it, build it. Too many among us look upon a mountain in the distance and think “I’d like to go there someday” and yet never take a single step towards it. Move your damn feet and you’ll get there – eventually. Remember, just like the NSA says, the impossible just takes longer.

3. How do you view “Sustainability” in what you do?

I view sustainability in the same way as many of our ideals: it is a constant goal but one rarely attained. Too often we fall prey to the ills of society and the weakness of our own will, but if we remain aware of these failings we can strive to better both through diligence. Sustainability is not just “reduce, reuse, recycle,” it is something that allows for the continued existence and well-being of ourselves and environment through minimal initial impact and long-term considerations of use.

 

4. What is your opinion of “Cooperatives”?

Sounds like some commie plot to me…

Cooperatives have a strong history and continued presence in agriculture for many of the same reasons we intone it here. That it provides for mutual benefit of members with reduced risk, bringing opportunity which could not ordinarily be attained on one’s own. Few are those with all of the skills necessary to conceptualize, design, build, maintain, and manage an organization, and those few who can likely will find it impossible to do all of these in the time they have, so working together and utilizing the strengths of one another to attain a mutual objective is almost a necessity.

5. How important is “Organic” design in your life, as opposed to simple mechanical design? For example in the food you eat, buildings you live in, and work you do…

“Organic” is certainly a bit of an overused and perhaps mis-applied term these days, but I admit a strong fondness for it anyway. Yes, I eat as much “Organic” food as possible, as I wish to limit my intake of toxins as much as possible and to support what I believe to be the proper direction of food production.

From a design standpoint, nature has already figured out how to work everything. Mimicking natural organic design is preferable to reinventing the wheel, yet we so often try to anyway. We tend to live in boxes, and this is not because they are beautiful, or efficient, or even necessarily convenient, but because the building industry told us we should. What other animals live in a box besides the ones we lock them into?

6. Do you have any other plans for future “Development” of these or any other goals?

Yes. I will attain effective immortality so that I have the time in which to meet them all.


ps – Eric Meulemans works at Albion Swords (Albion does make the swords from the Conan films, but the originals (which he is holding) were done by Jody Samson).

Drogo’s Guide to Alcohol

Posted in Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 16, 2010 by Drogo

Rubbing Alcohol – used on skin cuts and scrapes to sanitize

Grain Alcohol –  moonshine, white lightning, pure alcohol meant for the highest level of intoxicating drink; but so combustible it can be used as carbureted engine fuel, lamp oil, or as rubbing alcohol; it is the basic distillation of grains used in whiskey, gin, etc…

*

Liquors

6 Bottles & Mystery Decanter fit inside a 10″ x 10″ Cabinet

(Firewater, Kahlua, Rum, Vodka, Scotch Whiskey, Sherry, Decanter)

[ 750 ml tall & thin bottles; cheap and compact $10-$20 ]

*

Favorite Liquors (in order of preference):

1. Firewater (Cinnamon Schnapps Liqueur, hard sweet)

2. Sherry (Wine Liqueur, smooth sweet) “Fortified Wine”

3. Brandy (Wine Spirits, hard sweet) “Burnt Wine”

4. Rum (Sugar Molasses Spirits, hard sweet)

5. Kahlua (Coffee Liqueur, smooth sweet)

6. Whiskey (Grain Spirits): Scotch, Bourbon, Wisky (hard bitter)

7. Vodka (Potato or Grain Spirits, hard hard)

8. Tequila (Agave plant, hard bitter)

9. Gin (grain & juniper, spirits & citrus liqueur, hard bitter)

10.Peppermint Schnapps (Liqueur, hard sweet)

*

6 Basic Home Cabinet Liquors

1.  Rum (Sugar Molasses Spirits; hard sweet)

2.  Whiskey (Grain Spirits: Scotch, Bourbon, Wisky; hard bitter)

3.  Vodka (Potato or Grain Spirits; hard pure)

4.  Gin (grain & juniper, spirits & citrus liqueur; hard bitter)

5.  Tequila (Agave plant; hard bitter)

6.  Liqueurs (Schnapps, Sherry, Brandy; smooth sweet)

*

Note on Nicknames: The name for Whiskey comes from the Celtic “Uisge Beatha” meaning “Water of Life”. It was commonly called simply “Uske” for “Water”, which led to the pronunciation being spelled the way we do now. It was common for alcohol to be called “Water”, “Water of Life”, “Fire Water”, and “Dew”, as well as other nicknames that are not variations on ‘water’.

*

Fortified Wines include: port, sherry, madeira, marsala, and vermouth

The original reason for fortifying wine was to preserve it, since ethanol is a natural antiseptic. Also adding Liquors to Wines adds distinct flavors to the finished product, and makes the Wine stronger with a higher alcohol content, while retaining the wine flavor. Sherry is wine & brandy mixed.

***

Wines:

1.  Chablis  (sweet)

2.  Martha’s Vineyard

3.  Zinfandel (light white)

4.  Port  (heavy sweet)

5.  Cabaret Sauvignon (smooth sweet)

6.  Sangria (sweet tangy)

7.  Merlot (heavy bitter red)

8. Champaign

*

Beer, Ales, Lagers:

1.  Genius  (Stout Beer)

2.  Samuel Adams (heavy Lager)

3.  Rolling Rock  (pale beer)

4.  Irish Red Ale (heavy ale)

5.  Black & Tan (combined heavy and pale ale)

6.  Other American Piss-Water “Beers” (Natural Ice, Coors, Miller, Mich, Bud, etc…)

PDP Comic Strip

Posted in Medieval Tavern with tags , , , , , , , , on July 20, 2010 by Drogo

PDP Comic Strip

PDP #1

King Arthur

Posted in Book Reports, Film Reviews, History with tags , , , , , , , , on May 11, 2010 by Drogo

Immortal Medieval King of England

King Arthur

The historical fiction of King Arthur not only refers to the historic Dark-Age of England (circa 500 AD), but as literature his legend used cultural allegory and philosophical metaphor. As the economic and political system of the Roman Empire was collapsing, with the Empire’s treasury too depleted to pay military armies anymore, regional leaders in England were left to their own devices. The ‘Sword in the Stone’ legend combined the mythical concept that a royal orphan could by fate and the wisdom of sages, be hidden and later discovered when the people needed a hero to lead them, despite the corrupt grid-lock of the existing system. Excalibur was the symbol of divine right of champions to win popularity by force and fate.

Medieval swords were important chivalry symbols; the Celtic long sword with Spanish and Germanic influence was given a hilt, replacing the earlier Roman short sword (gladius). The ‘Round Table’ showed that rulers could use a council of ‘equals’, rather than just dictatorship. The Christian legend of the ‘Quest for the Holy Grail’ again reflected divine right, which was a common theme during the later Crusades. The history of King Arthur deals with Celtic, Roman, Pagan, Christian, and Anglo-Saxon-Jute political, cultural, and migration issues.

Barbarian & Viking

The last Pagan invasions & migrations 300-600-700-800 AD

Web List of King Arthur books and films

Brother Cadfael Mysteries

Posted in Book Reports, Fictional Stories, Film Reviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 4, 2010 by Drogo

Brother Cadfael Mysteries

Medieval Sherlock Holmes

Series I (1994):
• One Corpse Too Many (Episode 101 – Book 2)
• The Sanctuary Sparrow (Episode 102 – Book 7)
• The Leper of Saint Giles (Episode 103 – Book 5)
• Monk’s Hood (Episode 104 – Book 3)
Series II (1995-1996):
• The Virgin in the Ice (Episode 201 – Book 6)
• The Devil’s Novice (Episode 202 – Book 8)
• A Morbid Taste for Bones (Episode 203 – Book 1)
Series III (1997):
• The Rose Rent (Episode 301 – Book 13)
• Saint Peter’s Fair (Episode 302 – Book 4)
• The Raven in the Foregate (Episode 303 – Book 12)
Series IV (1998):
• The Holy Thief (Episode 401 – Book 19)
• The Potter’s Field (Episode 402 – Book 17)
• The Pilgrim of Hate (Episode 403 – Book 10)

Novels
1. A Morbid Taste for Bones (written in 1977, set in 1137)
2. One Corpse Too Many (1979, set in August 1138)
3. Monk’s Hood (1980, set in December 1138)
4. Saint Peter’s Fair (1981, set in July 1139)
5. The Leper of Saint Giles (1981, set in October 1139)
6. The Virgin in the Ice (1982, set in November 1139)
7. The Sanctuary Sparrow (1983, set in the Spring of 1140)
8. The Devil’s Novice (1983, set in September 1140)
9. Dead Man’s Ransom (1984, set in February 1141)
10. The Pilgrim of Hate (1984, set in May 1141)
11. An Excellent Mystery (1985, set in August 1141)
12. The Raven in the Foregate (1986, set in December 1141)
13. The Rose Rent (1986, set in June 1142)
14. The Hermit of Eyton Forest (1988, set in October 1142)
15. The Confession of Brother Haluin (1988, set in December 1142)
16. The Heretic’s Apprentice (1990, set in June 1143)
17. The Potter’s Field (1990, set in August 1143)
18. The Summer of the Danes (1991, set in April 1144)
19. The Holy Thief (1992, set in August 1144)
20. Brother Cadfael’s Penance (1994, set in November 1145)

Musical Blades

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance) with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 28, 2009 by coffeedude65

After watching the GO GREEN Promontage 03 video on Youtube, with the music from Cruachan, I must confess I have not been familiar with this wonderful band.  I have looked into their music and I am hooked.  So I thought I would share a probably less known, and more local band that I truly enjoy.  I wish I could see them more often than just waiting for the Ren Faire season, but they are named “The Musical Blades”.  They are far different than Cruachan and I am not sure why I connected the two in my mind, although they both move me far more than any contemporary music does these days.

The Musical blades are a pirate act that performs regularly at the Faires in the Midwest, I am not sure their entire schedule (it is available on their website http://www.musicalblades.com/ ) but I believe they have worked Faires throughout several states in the Midwest.  Some of my old vids have their music as backing, and if I can find the footage on my PC, I have some wonderful performances by them.  They truly enjoy what they are doing and they love to involve the crowd in their often ribald songs.

Some of my best Faire memories of the last couple of years, is sitting in a little pub or pavilion with a full mug of ale, singing and stomping my feet with a mighty “HUZZZAHHH”.

“When I die, I want to go to pirate heaven………..”

Tables Round

Posted in SCOD Pipedream Pub with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 18, 2009 by eposognatus

Recently, Comrade Drogo and I were discussing the Winchester Round Table, and as well various designs for tables round, and whether their centre be cut away for ease in serving, etc. The modern perception of the round table is that first echoed by Wace in Roman de Brut, written in 1155:

“On account of his noble Barons, each of whom thought himself the best and none of whom accounted himself the worst, Arthur made the Round Table, of which the Britons tell many fabulous tales. There sat his vassals, all noble and all equal; they sat equally at table and were equally served. No one of them could boast of sitting higher than his peer.”

A Round Table may also describe a gathering or tournament, often featuring motifs or outright imitation of Arthurian elements (i.e. assuming the names and arms of Arthur’s Knights). It is one thing to take these ideals and use them in symbolic play, and quite another to doggedly uphold them for the greater good. Even as we see the spirit of truth, equality, and dissemination of knowledge in both this blog and the form of the round table, others may just as willfully malign those images for their own gain, as Henry VIII contrived to do in his fabrication of the round table at Winchester.

Among my own favorite interpretations of the physical and spiritual manifestation of the Round Table is featured in the film Mazeppa, as you may view here now.