Archive for morals

The Problem with Taking Religion Seriously

Posted in Ethics & Morals, Religions, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 27, 2019 by Drogo

Christianity forced itself on me when i was a boy, and it constantly tries to get me to submit and sacrifice to the authority of its Churches, so I feel that I always have a right to speak out about it. 

Christianity cannot help itself, it is designed to convert others. When I am critical of Christianity I do it not as a native repelling an alien invader, but as a Christian who wants to try to be something more than what tradition and convention dictated. I am constantly reminded of inescapable antiquated social limits that I will always be contained inside by living in current US culture. We can all agree on some basic ethics and habits (like washing and sleeping and cleaning), but needing one book or a god to tell us is a bit juvenile.

Being able to resist and deconstruct Christian authority is important because it is insipid. Christianity by design gets into all aspects of culture, from churches to schools and governments. Based on the rebel family unit, the slave religion was devastating to the Roman Empire because people were peacefully protesting authority by resisting as sacrifices unwilling to function for the Empire. Rome of course solved this by adopting the slave religion as the state religion, and therefore to resist authority became Christian heresy. The Bible has several passages not only of arrogant egocentric God-level pride, but also dictates about spreading the word to the heathens, so it is constantly on a mission of conversion. If one chooses not to be a Christian in society for the past several hundred years, they must constantly be on guard and resist by every means possible, which means not only ignoring conventions, but also at times mocking the insanity of dogma. Although the Bible says that God is too jealous to be denied his power, joking about religion is certainly a good test of its power. 

This same problem of aggressive religious authority also applies to any fundamentalist religion. The problems of power are not confined to religion, but also apply to government in the form of conservative Nationalism. The Nazis did not need Jesus to act like the Popes of the Crusades.

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Earnings & Rights

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization, Ethics & Morals, History, jobs, Legal / Laws, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 28, 2019 by Drogo

What is ‘earned’ or a ‘right’ is much more debatable than most people realize. 

Rights and even earnings rarely come free, you have to work and often fight to get them and maintain them. As different as they may seem, RIGHTS and EARNING can be switched in the main statement, and it still works as a philosophical statement to question. Rights and even earnings rarely come free, you have to work and often fight to get them and maintain them. What are rights and earnings is a sophistry question that has been left up to lawyers hired by oligarchs because ‘the common people are too stupid to decide because they are poor. Most people are poor because they are stupid, and stupid because they are poor’. This why democracy and socialism (the idea of how to apply democracy to capitalism) are not desired by leaders, even ones who lied about supporting the movements like dictators and presidents. 

Socrates himself is given by Plato as an example of why Democracy does not work (although this is rarely pointed out as an issue by classical scholars). Not only did Socrates question random people about the limits of their knowledge, and therefore question their democratic right to decide issues outside of their profession; but Socrates was finally killed by the system that he questioned.

For example “I earned everything I have.” is a bold statement that seems clear on its surface, but the opposite can also be seem 100% if they have taken from poor people that despite working harder also have grievances like losing homes or ability to work. Also civil rights must be proven by fighting for them against those who claim they are not rights, but only privileges. Rights and even earnings rarely come free, you have to work and often fight to get them and maintain them. That includes what are called ‘natural rights’ that people associate with being alive, like freedom or liberty. Some people may think that rights should be given, so when they fight for them under authorities it is only to get that which was theirs already. Most people think that the definition of earnings is that you should always have to work to get anything, because nothing is free least of all freedom. It is considered common sense to assume if you have something you do not deserve then you did not really ‘earn it’ even if it is legally part of their earned income, and only other people can determine if you have actually earned anything legitimately, even if they will argue of course that they are purely deserving. All of these logic problems have created massive reasoning issues within the philosophy of civilized ethics.

My 3 most important political issues: Income, Peace, Health.

Immanuel Kant

Posted in History, Philosophy, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on December 13, 2017 by Drogo

Immanuel Kant was one of the greatest rational philosophers of the Enlightenment, and set a categorical standard for modern reasoning. All of Kant’s years from birth to death (1724-1804), were spent in the small provincial town Konigsberg, in East Prussia. Kant’s grand-father was of Scotch lineage, but if he had kept the original spelling (Cant), the C would have been pronounced as a Z by the citizens of Konigsberg. Also Kant’s original first name was Emanuel, but he changed it to Immanuel after learning Hebrew. Both of Kant’s parents were modest financially and religiously; but spiritually nurtured by a Christian Lutheran sect called the Pietists. Being a Pietist Christian, Kant had a mixed sense of pride in religious rigor, and humility about humble limitations.

Kant was first educated at the local College; then in 1740 Kant went to the University of Konigsburg, where he studied the classics, physics, and philosophy. The master of German Philosophy at the time was Christian von Wolff; who was a dominant secretary of the Enlightenment movement, and stated that “man could be happy and good without the divine grace of revelation”. This atheist statement angered the ‘Soldier King’ of Prussia, King Frederick William I; however his condemnation only enhanced Wolff’s international fame. Immanuel Kant revered Wolff as the “most powerful representative of dogmatic rationalism, from the stand-point of pure unshaken confidence in the strength of Reason.” Kant eventually replaced Wolff as the popular national philosopher.

In Kant’s home town of Konigsburg, the city burghers were said to set their watches when Kant passed by their windows on his precisely-timed daily walks. He did not write his most famous works until he was older. When people that knew him read his work, they often agreed that it was logical and well-ordered, just like Kant himself. Kant applied his logic to a mature reflection on whether or not to marry; he decided finally to remain single. Kant’s travels did not exceed the city boundaries, his life had no remarkable adventures or political power or social connections, yet he was an immensely successful tutor, lecturer, and a charming host.

Immanuel Kant was a man of clear, critical, logical, vigorous, rigorous, and trenchant thought. In his Critique of Pure Reason he methodically divides chapters to explore ‘a priori’ metaphysical issues. ‘A priori’ is the pure form of sensuous general intuitions, that existed prior to our physical existence; archetypal knowledge from before we were born. Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason was followed by the Critique of Practical Reason (1788) and the Critique of Judgment (1790).

“Act always in such a way. that you should want your action to become a universal law.” – Immanuel Kant. This categorical imperative is one of the main recommendations of Kant’s writings. Although it centers around action, Kant also said that virtue was in the ‘Will’, and not the ‘Act’. Consciousness involves feeling, thinking, and acting. Feeling regards faith, thinking seeks epistemology, and acting involves ethics.

Ikant 1

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SCOD Economic Theory

Posted in Economics, Organic Development, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 16, 2016 by Drogo

Imagine for a minute that Capitalism was not ‘the only economic system that works’, as popular opinion believes; but instead that Capitalism is a failed system by humanitarian standards, that greedy people perpetuate so that no government can ever serve its’ citizens democratically. Most conservative capitalists would rather see church morality imposed on the masses, because that is their only response to the failings of Capitalism. When homeless get no government support, the capitalists will say “if they are too lazy to work, then they should find a church to take pity on them.” When a crazy person wants to exercise their amendment rights, rather than recommending they get help or take free medicine, the capitalists will say “they need to commit a crime so that we can put them in prison”. What if instead of trying to cover up for the failings of a selfish individualist economic system, we instead worked hard to practice an economic system that is for the common good, with its own built-in ethical code? SCOD economic theory is a combination of trade-barter and spiritual morality*. SCOD theory uses a sensible code of economic ethics* to foster transactions.

Offer only as much as you can spare, do not gamble all that you have. The higher your price is, the less you want to exchange it. Before finalizing a trade, consider how the transaction will affect the other party; if that trade will hurt them and they are ethical traders, then cut them a bonus break-deal. A bonus break-deal is when you give them MORE than they asked for, because you appreciate them as an ethical individual.

Mutual trade with ethical responsibility and humanitarian benefit.

*morality is more to do with religious dogma of reward and punishment, and ethics is more about common sense and having social respect for the good of the whole community.

Princess and Her Pets

Posted in Book Reports, Dr. Dippie, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on January 15, 2016 by Drogo

princess pets

Princess and Her Pets – a book for pet lovers

Princess loves her pets. They can do no wrong. Her pets only know peace, love, and fear; unlike bad people. Princess keeps her pets well groomed. She loves to pet them, comb them, and bathe them. She gives them treats when they are good, and they are always good. Her pets cause sneaky mischief, stinky stink-stink, and have a silly habit of killing people; but Princess loves them one and all!

5 Rule Theory on Gaming

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Psychology with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 4, 2011 by Drogo

Drogo’s Gaming Theory

Five Rules for Roleplaying, Rollplaying, and related playing of strategy and character based games…


Playing games for fun is not a phase for me. I don’t only play the latest and coolest, most trendy games. Nor have I even been in a regular group of gamers in years. However I do consider myself a Master of several games, at least in one or two capacities. One of those games I played for years with other people was Dungeons & Dragons. After 10 years of playing I was a Master Dungeon Master, proficient at a few styles of control. It was during my apprenticeship to older Dungeon Masters that I acquired my philosophy of game play.

My favorite Dungeon Masters had similar traits, although they did not know each other. Their ways of controlling was compatible with their ways of playing. Their dominant traits tended to avoid or deny gain by intentional selfishness, rudeness, greed, or cruelty. If spite bias was ever used, it was for conflict resolution. Here I will attempt to list the guidelines of my theory for running games:

1. Prepare ahead of time, so that game play will run smoothly. Preparation can minimize lost time searching through notes or the rule book. Have a few conclusions in mind, and what the psychological results might be.

2. Roll alot of dice to maintain a continuous element of Neutrality, while guiding the story.

3. Guide the story with subtle bias in favor of the characters because you care about the individual people playing.

4. Foster morality and ethics by rewarding ‘goodness’ and punishing ‘badness’. This concept is relative to Character Alignment. Good characters will be guided or controlled by Good Deities, and Bad characters will be guided or controlled by Evil Deities. The result of this is that if the player acts ‘out-of-alignment’ and refuses to correct their behavior, the DM can step in and guide or control their character by using a ‘higher power’ (like a Deity) in the game.

For example if a player wants to play a ‘good’ character, but acts ‘bad’ then an Evil Deity can take control of their character. Whether the player gets control back, depends on whether or not the player modifies the alignment to fit their behavior, or changes their actions to fit the alignment better. If a player wants to play an evil character, and they are being awful to other players or the DM, the DM may retain control of their character through the Evil Deity indefinitely. This is one way to attempt to have good game play, rather than ban players or quit the game.

5. Help everyone to have fun!!!

* not included: tips on game writing or character creating