Archive for owners

Self-Publishing Paradox

Posted in Book Reports, Commercial Corporations, Crafts, Critical Commentary of Civilization, jobs, Languages, Pub Library, Services, Sales or Trade, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 27, 2018 by Drogo

How DC area book stores handle major publishers vs. local authors in 2018.

Book stores are still stuck in the old mentality with major publishers, rather than allow the flooded local markets to flourish with support. Retail profits largely hinge on perceived ‘popularity’ of brands, which is largely self-perpetuating based on reduced whole sale rates, and exaggerated sales advertising to push the merchandise on customers. Book mongers still have a very snobbish attitude towards local authors, even more so now that printed books are in competition with ebooks. Book mongers, like other capitalists will often declare that “there is a DEMAND’ for what they are selling, just as housing developers do when they create a artificial demand by making the supply and cornering the market with advertising and debt based commercial production.

Here is how one book store describes their consignment process on their website:

“Our consignment program helps us accommodate the overwhelming number of requests from local authors who wish to sell their books and host events at Curious Iguana. If, after reading all the information here, you have any questions, email. Please do not stop by or call the store with questions about our consignment program. Click here to download our Consignment Policies and Consignment Form for Author. Note that we do not read review copies, and we do not accept any books without a completed consignment form and FEE. About events – We receive numerous event requests from local authors every week. Only authors whose books have strong consignment sales and broad reader appeal will be considered for an event on a case-by-case basis. Authors should not expect that consigning books will result in an event.”

Consignment usually forces the local author to be in debt to the local store, rather than provide them with any net income. Local authors tend to purchase more books at stores from commercial authors in one visit, than their books may sell all year; so even local authors are more likely to spend more on international authors than their own book sales will make in years. After a few years of their books not being advertised, but often hidden, the author must then contact the store and ask what has sold, and then pick up their check if any have sold. Now that there are more local authors, they are even asked to pick up their remaining books to make room for others. In essence local authors are treated like cattle, and told they are not worthy to make money, and they should be lucky to have a consignment deal before getting kicked out. Quality differences in the contents of books, whether self published or not, have very little to do with these market issues; as mistakes can be found with many mass produced products. Even National Geographic published the wrong image of a sparrow in a major commercial release; not just typos but the very information that is the focus of the ‘best selling’ book can be factually wrong.

Perhaps some day there will be a book store just for local and self-published authors, and their books will be PURCHASED just like the major brand names are now, rather than relegated to forgotten shelves and treated as though they are not worth the paper they are printed on. Perhaps some day we will invest more in our local economies, rather than giving all profits to a few rich fat cats that could barely care less.

So in this area there are basically 2 stores that accept local authors, but due to demands by local authors that they have a place to sell their books, it is increasingly rare that the small portion of the store dedicated to local authors will have room for everyone in the flooded self-published book market. It seems that self-published is a niche market that is not being allowed space due to corporate monopolist priorities. The competitive cut-throat capitalist monopoly model of economics, stands in contrast to the sharing and networking pluralist (multiplicity) more free-market model. Some business workers pride themselves for being very morally patient with customers, clients, bosses, employees, co-workers, and partners; in that they value them as fellow humans and are very generous to the point of pleasantly accepting financial loss as sacrifice for more happiness. That moral model is considered a bad business model for serious capitalists however, because survival success of business is based on financial capital, not ethical capital. There is a strong historic argument to be made that more financial wealth can be made quicker and greater by meaner people that take huge risks, rather than generous people who tend to give away and share more (studies show these people are often considered ‘poor’).

Self-published authors can be economically vital, if local stores open to showcase them as the main product. Some regional examples may soon show that people will travel from around the world to visit unique collections that support populations directly with financing. Rather than stores asking you pay to maybe keep your book there temporarily, and refusing to talk to authors in person or on the phone about the issue of slavish consignment; an alternative option will be to support stores that support self-published authors, which would make independent authors the best meaning (and most fitting use) of the word ‘common’. Possibly current store owners don’t want to be harming the local economy by practicing their old business models, but supply and demand and advertising have very real aspects that corporations do not want commoners to discuss.

The self-publishing paradox is that although the book market is flooded by grassroots citizens writing and publishing books, the means to support them are not part of conventional business models. Even alternative efforts are suppressed due to social, economic, and linguistic self-destructive elitism. Most people that write books do it because they love it or are best at it, not because of the economic incentives because it is generally well known that artists, musicians, and writers are not given living wages. The attitude that the voice of the people is not worth hearing, has never been considered wise or good.

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Princess and Her Pets

Posted in Book Reports, Dr. Dippie, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on January 15, 2016 by Drogo

princess pets

Princess and Her Pets – a book for pet lovers

Princess loves her pets. They can do no wrong. Her pets only know peace, love, and fear; unlike bad people. Princess keeps her pets well groomed. She loves to pet them, comb them, and bathe them. She gives them treats when they are good, and they are always good. Her pets cause sneaky mischief, stinky stink-stink, and have a silly habit of killing people; but Princess loves them one and all!

ON DOGS AND OWNERS

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Legal / Laws, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on November 28, 2015 by Drogo

SCOD Community Theory regarding pets, owners, and justice laws.

Dogs have more simplistic brains than humans, but they can be mischievous, unpredictable, and dangerous in similar ways. There should be less dog owners, as most owners are irresponsible. If there cannot be less dog owners, than we need better owners. I am not sure that either can be achieved legally, unless new laws are made restricting the ownership of dogs in urban areas. In wild or rural settings, less civilized situations should be expected.

Problems with Bad Owners and Dogs

We must admit that there are both bad owners and bad dogs. Dog owners tend to let their dogs act however they want, and either cannot or do not control them. Bad dogs and their bad owners are a menace to society, as often one cannot be distinguished from the other. Bad dogs and owners act together in ways that put other citizens in danger of being threatened and bitten, if not severely mauled or killed. Saying that there are ‘no bad dogs, only bad owners’ is a false statement; as there most certainly are bad dogs, just as any mammal that is able to kill and eat other beings, can act more or less harmful to others in subjectively bad ways. Some ‘bad’ dogs are bad most of the time; some dogs may be good some of the time with their owners, and bad some of the time with strangers; and some dogs may be good most of the time, and bad some of the time. Animals can be ‘dicks’ just like humans. Im not sure why people think that animals are supernatural angels; when clearly dogs may attack and try to kill many other types of animals, not just humans. I think we have a desire to own a magical unicorn that will only give us unconditional love and have no other motives; but this is not the reality of Nature. Mammals one and all, have emotions and desires which motivate their behaviors; some are more loving and some are more hating, and I do not believe it is only one species that is capable of being ‘good’ or ‘bad’, that would be truly racist, since humans are considered a ‘race of species’ (the human race). there are WAY TOO MANY DOGS walking irresponsible owners around the sub-urbs, and many owners that should not have dogs in public. The problem is not a case of some of us ‘not liking dogs’, since plenty of dogs are easily loved, petted, snuggled, and played with by people that do not like bad dogs or bad owners. Also the problem is also not about dogs ‘sensing emotions’, as many people who are bitten by dogs were happy minding their own business, or calm and content before they get engaged and attacked by dogs that do not want to behave or listen to humans.

Solutions to Bad Owners and Dogs

Both bad owners and bad dogs should be held accountable for their behavior and actions. Leashes and walls are important to control dogs. When dogs are not restrained by walls or leash, and are out-of-control, anyone that witnesses them should call upon the owners by yelling “LEASH!”, to get the owners to secure the dog by body and collar, and apply the leash. Owners cannot be trusted by saying ‘my dog does not bite’, because dogs can go many years before biting, until they bite someone. Dogs, like humans, can change their behavior not just from sickness, but also threats to their security; such as a new dog or person that they feel competes for their attention from and influence over their owner.

First ‘problem incidents’ are identified; such as dogs aggressively threatening people that do not deserve it, or dogs barking or acting chaotically without civil control. Next it should be determined how severe the situations are, on a scale of 1-10; 1 being perhaps a one-time non-repeating minor annoyance, and 10 being the dog killed or mangled a person or animal that has some value (we might not call a dog bad for attacking Hitler). Then punishments should be determined for various levels of severity. 1-5 could be considered more resolvable, and requirements to make amends or fix the problems should be demanded with time limits. 5-10 could be considered less resolvable and will require the removal of either the dog or both the dog and the owner; if the problem was too harmful or clearly will continue despite efforts. Finally it is the responsibility of those in control of the SCOD community to deal with these issues, remove those that need to be removed, and follow up to ensure the safety of the shire.

Severity of Problem / Examples / Solutions

1 dog barking too much – muzzle the dog

2 dog chasing or barking – keep the dog contained

3 dog chasing, barking, or jumping on – muzzle the dog, keep the dog contained

4 dog allowed by owner to act chaotically – muzzle, keep contained, and mandate training of both

5 dog threatening to bite – muzzle, confine, and mandate training of both; countdown to eviction

6 dog nips or scratches – muzzle, confine, and mandate training of both; countdown to eviction; fine $25

7 dog bites, scratches, and barks – muzzle, confine, and mandate training of both; countdown to eviction; fine $50

8 dog maims another pet – muzzle, confine, and mandate training of both; possible eviction; fine $75

9 dog maims a human – muzzle, confine, Evict; fine $100

10 dog kills – muzzle, confine, Evict; fine $500; call police if needed

 

  • Human’s should be held to similar legal standards