Archive for poison

Covid Crisis Cover for Poisoning

Posted in Artificial Chemical Products, biology, Commercial Corporations, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Ethics & Morals, news, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on March 29, 2020 by Drogo

The COVID Virus pandemic outbreak and quarantine period is exciting because it is exposing and increasing related economic and social issues that were under corporate media radar. Yes the Covid virus is real and dangerous and has plenty of attention with statistics, but corporate corruption is real too. Environmental pollution is not just a conspiracy theory, it is quite often a result of actual corporate conspiracies. In this case industrial companies wrote to Trump begging to be allowed to pollute more, and so he complied by shutting down the EPA, rather than giving the EPA proper hazmat suits for inspections.

“The EPA has been under pressure from a number of industries, including the oil industry, to suspend enforcement of a number of environmental regulations due to the pandemic. In a 10-page letter to EPA earlier this week, the American Petroleum Institute (API) asked for a suspension of rules that require repairing leaky equipment as well as monitoring to make sure pollution doesn’t seep into nearby water. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a sweeping suspension of its enforcement of environmental laws Thursday, telling companies they would not need to meet environmental standards during the corona-virus outbreak. The temporary policy, for which EPA has set no end date, would allow any number of industries to skirt environmental laws, with the agency saying it will not “seek penalties for noncompliance with routine monitoring and reporting obligations.”” – The Hill

“The Environmental Protection Agency is planning to waive compliance requirements and deadlines for a range of industries, including oil refiners, water utilities and sewage plants, as it seeks to help businesses affected by the coronavirus pandemic, according to Trump administration officials.” – March 24, 2020 Wall Street Journal

Oil Companies will be poisoning more [Article].

Coal Companies will be poisoning more [Article].

And many other companies like Dupont and Monsanto will have more lawsuits against them for poisoning us with their chemicals.

The are also several recent books and films made about these issues [‘The Devil We Know‘, ‘Dark Waters‘, ‘Conspiracy of Fools‘]

The point being an emergency like this is time to gear up with hazmat suits for inspections, not give them a free pass to poison us. Trump is worse than other corporate politicians, but they have given similar passes before. Let us hope this is the climax for the worst, and let us take responsibility by increasing democracy and regulations that protect us.

more later…..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pokeberry Plant

Posted in Crafts, Food & Drink, Nature Studies, Organic Gardens, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 20, 2019 by Drogo

Pokeberry plant leaves are edible when young, but most toxic when mature (like rhubarb). Many people are allergic to the toxins so all parts of the plant are poisonous to them. The roots are the most toxic. The leaves are edible when young after being boiled 3x in water changes, or for those of us not allergic to poke frying in oil or butter is fine. Documented cases are common for people allergic to poke, but there are people like me who have been around poke their whole lives, handled the plants often, and squished the berries for stain and ink without any problems beyond our skin getting stained crimson for a day or two. I have heard of someone getting a skin rash from poke (like poison ivy), as they are allergic to touching it; but I am not. My mother had us paint and print with poke berry ink on water-color paper as children, with no problems.

Poke berries are not edible, but when used with vinegar and salt (and other blends) can make ink for writing pens and printing on paper. Pokeberry ink is not archival because it fades over time on paper, even when not exposed to sunlight everyday. However pokeberry ink is a interesting local organic native alternative to industrial toxic inks, but modern use is still experimental although the chemicals in it are known. In gardens they are beautiful in full maturity, with their ornate ‘goblin’ fruits.

“Indians and early settlers used the root in poultices and certain drugs for skin diseases and rheumatism.” – Michael Owen, ISU

The late 19th century herbal, the ‘King’s American Dispensatory’, describes various folk medical uses that led individuals to ingest pokeberry products. Modern commercial medical companies (big pharma) snubs remedies that are found commonly, for obvious pharmaceutical sales reasons, and so serious testing might be hard to study at length with funding for the purposes of common good, for free but cautious home use.

CAUTION:  Many people are allergic to poke toxins, so limit your exposure to the plant to reduce possible effects. There are many medical claims that eating poke roots, berries, or anything from the adult plant can kill in sufficient quantities.

Other articles: ‘Making Pokeweed Ink‘; ‘Pokeberry Ink‘;

For safer printing for all people, perhaps black-berries or mul-berries or huckle-berries are better? For long-term organic industrial printing, using a weed like poke which is not used for human food would make more sense for sustainability though. [Link Process for making any type of berry ink]

[photo from Wikipedia]

Phytolacca_pokeberries

Corporate Chemical POISONS

Posted in Artificial Chemical Products, Commercial Corporations, Legal / Laws, Medical, Science & Math, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on July 23, 2017 by Drogo

First rule regarding Corporate POISONS: #1 DO NOT TRUST THE COMPANY;

Second rule regarding Corporate POISONS (and big money influence): #2: Do not trust the ‘test results’.

My grandfather was poisoned by arsenic lead that the company said was safe for farmers to breathe in the fields. It made his lungs bleed because it actually did poison him, despite their claims. Any chemical manufactured and sold commercially should not be trusted to be ‘safe’, even if ‘scientists tested it’. The only chemicals we can truly ever trust, are natural organic chemicals that humans have worked with for hundreds or better yet thousands of years. Poisons that have negative affects on some carbon-based life-form species who have DNA, probably have some adverse affects on related carbon-based life-form species who have DNA; because Ecology and Biology tend to work like that.

FUCK MONSANTO!!! Pirate Flag X

Poison Ivy – The Worst Weed

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Nature Studies, Organic Gardens with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 26, 2010 by Drogo

Poison Ivy is the Worst Weed


From the Norris NPR interview of Dr. Lewis Ziska, plant physiologist for the USDA:

Many people are allergic to poison ivy, a vine with triple leaf clusters.

“Even if you barely brush up against it, you can get an angry, weeping, contagious, red rash that takes weeks to heal. Well, it turns out that poison ivy, along with its voracious cousins poison oak and poison sumac, is even more of a nuisance this summer. The plants are spreading faster, growing larger, showing up in new places and becoming more toxic. It’s the kind of thing that’s so scary, it almost deserves its own soundtrack.”

So why is Poison Ivy the worst weed in 2010?

“One of the things that we think is occurring is that as carbon dioxide is increasing in the atmosphere. Carbon Dioxide is a basic greenhouse gas, but it’s also plant food. And plants take that carbon, and they convert it into sugars and carbohydrates and so forth.

“But not all plants respond the same way to that resource, and we think that vines, particularly vines like poison ivy or kudzu or other noxious weeds, seem to show a much stronger response to the change in CO2 than other plant species. So on average, the poison ivy plant of 1901, can grow up to 60 percent larger as of 2010 just from the change in CO2 alone, all other things being equal.

“And as a result of that change, we see not only more growth but also a more virulent form of the oil within poison ivy. The oil is called urushiol, and it’s that oil that causes that causes that rash to occur on your skin…”

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Unfortunately, pulling poison ivy (if you are not allergic) often breaks the vine off above ground, and leaves the root system underground. This is like the Sorcerer’s Apprentice chopping the mops in half, and they multiply like a hydra head. So as much as an organic gardener hates to admit it, poisoning poison ivy is the best way to fight it. Just one problem: Poisons do not work very well either. Here are some photos of Poison Ivy after using 2 different brands of “Poison Ivy Herbicide” after 2 weeks. While dumping the herbicides on the areas will kill everything there, you can see here a few squirts of poison sometimes barely wilts the leaves, even when there is no rain.

note: Poison Ivy is the vine with 3 leaves, below on the ground is common English Ivy

Although I have mercy on most other wild plants that people call weeds, I have no mercy on poison ivy because my mother is very allergic to it. Poison Ivy threats to take over as many gardens as it can get itself into, and after years of killing it, it has remained in the same area for over 40 years. Somewhere underground, there must be a mother root of poison ivy continuously sending out branches. Crabgrass and Wisteria are the same way; there seems to be no way to stop them from coming back within a 40 foot area. If you have any success stories, please post them below!

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Top Five Worst Weeds (not useful or harmful)

1. Poison Ivy

2. Crab Grass

3. Wisteria & Kudzu (aesthetic but strong, fast growing and extremely destructive vines)

4. English Ivy, Virginia Creeper, Honey Suckle (aesthetic but damaging vines)

5. Thistles, Briers, Burrs

Top Five Best Weeds (useful as food for humans and bees)

1. Lambs Quarters

2. Dandelions

3. Clovers

4. Mints

5. Wild Spinaches, Mustards, Flowers, etc…