Archive for scifi

12 Monkeys SCOD Review

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization, Film Reviews, History, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on May 11, 2018 by Drogo

The SCOD ‘FALLOUT 2020’ film uses critical montages of films that relate to the questioning of contemporary modern civilization, specifically the industrial capitalist way of life. Some social issues affect more than our limited individual/daily perspectives; a desire to be at constant War may have dramatic consequences on humanity and the planet Earth as we know it. The second part shows 2 kinds of holocaust survivors: surface-scraggs and under-ground-bomb-shelter-dwellers.

Contributing references are: Falling Down, Fight Club, Naquoyqatsi, Koyannisqatsi, Mad Max, Road Warrior, 12 Monkeys, the War on Terror, New World Order, 1984 George Orwell, Biohazard State of the World Address, Bad Religion, Dead Kennedys, etc

Regarding the importance of 12 Monkeys in SCOD theory, several plot points and quotes are significant for their profound post-modern meanings.

1. Historical importance has value for future events as well, because the future does become history. History has lessons, and time travel can be a state of mind.

2. The script origin ‘La Jetee’ inspired both Terminator and 12 Monkeys, and deals with time travel to stop a terrible historic event, in order to save humanity. Fate is not fixed. Technology does not solve problems for humanity without ethics.

3. Social concern for people as individuals is more important than trying to ‘save’ all of humanity through inhuman actions like war or assassination. A logical killer can be just as terrible as an emotional killer.

4. Reality and imagination are connected in ways that can easily make humans delusional, but traumatic situations can cause schizo break-downs in otherwise sober and normal people.

5. Ethical problems generally need more empathetic mystery solving, to avoid more violence later. Large environmental or social problems often make sane people do insane things.

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Dr. Peters: I think, Dr. Railly, you have given your “alarmists” a bad name. Surely there is very real and very convincing data that the planet cannot survive the excesses of the human race: proliferation of atomic devices, uncontrolled breeding habits, the rape of the environment, the pollution of land, sea, and air. In this context, isn’t it obvious that “Chicken Little” represents the sane vision and that Homo Sapiens’ motto, “Let’s go shopping!” is the cry of the true lunatic?

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Poet: Yet among the myriad microwaves, the infra-red messages, the gigabytes of ones and zeroes, we find words, byte-sized now, tinier even than science lurking in some vague electricity, but if we but listen we can hear the solitary voice of that poet telling us, “Yesterday This Day’s Madness did prepare; Tomorrow’s Silence, Triumph or Despair: Drink! for you know not whence you came, nor why: Drink! for you know not why you go, nor where.”

  • Cassandra in Greek legend, you recall, was condemned to know the future but to be disbelieved when she foretold it. Hence the agony of foreknowledge combined with the impotence to do anything about it.

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L.J. WASHINGTON: I don’t really come from outer space. It’s a condition of mental divergence. I find myself on the planet Ogo. Part of an intellectual elite preparing to subjugate the barbarian hordes on Pluto. But even though this is a totally convincing reality for me in every way, nevertheless, Ogo is actually a construct of my psyche. I am mentally divergent in that I am escaping certain unnamed realities that plague my life here. When I stop going there, I will be well. Are you also divergent, friend?

Divergent reality is a theme of the film. Is Cole mentally divergent? Is the future of 2035 his Planet Ogo? And if so, what “unnamed realities” have plagued Cole’s life so he would invent such a reality? We don’t get any answers to these questions, and the film offers us enough evidence to craft multiple, conflicting readings. Washington appears to plant that seed of doubt, which makes the multi-layered plot more interesting.

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James Cole: Look at them. They’re just asking for it. Maybe the human race deserves to be wiped out.

Jeffrey Goines: Wiping out the human race? That’s a great idea. That’s great. But more of a long-term thing. I mean, first we have to focus on more immediate goals.

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I’ve never seen La Jetee. If I do something based on something else I make it a principle not to read or see the original: I’ll be intimidated by it, or I’ll feel an awesome sense of responsibility. So I avoid that problem. There was something about the idea that people putting layer upon layer to protect themselves from a potential infection, end up in a sense isolating themselves from one another. And I became obsessed with that. The locations I’ve used were old disused power stations around Philadelphia and Baltimore. Nuclear plants, factories, power stations: “cathedrals of technological progress.” I’ve always had a problem with the belief that technology was going to solve all of our problems; so I’m drawn to shooting in those places, particularly for this film, which is about decay and about nostalgia. These great spaces were considered to be providing the solution to all of our problems, yet now they’re just wasted, lying there, rotting. And that seemed very much what a lot of the film was about. About putting your faith in the wrong things. Television seems to be ubiquitous in “Twelve Monkeys”. Every scene has got a television screen in it doing something. It’s because I think television is this awful mirror that we all look into every day, but it distorts the reflection and I hate it. It trivializes life. Rather than really enlightening us, it ends up just dragging us down to the lowest, into the boring and the tedious. And however much you try to resist it, you begin to believe the world really is that way. “There’s the television. It’s all right there — all right there. Look, listen, kneel, pray!” So we’ve included it in the film. And it shows commercials that are doing strange things, and cartoons, which works very nicely as a juxtaposition to some of the scenes that are going on. – Terry Gilliam, Director

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Drogo’s Favorite Books

Posted in Book Reports, Fictional Stories, Philosophy with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 6, 2010 by Drogo

Popular Classics: Travel Fantasy & SciFi-Horror Genres

Plato:  Atlantis, The Republic

Sir Thomas More:  Utopia

Swift:  Gulliver’s Travels

Jules Verne:  Journey to the Center of the Earth, Around the World in 80 Days, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

HG Wells:  Time Machine, War of the Worlds,

George Orwell:  1984, Animal Farm

Aldous Huxley:  Brave New World, Doors of Perception, & Island

Check out a book in which Huxley compares his own book, Brave New World with Orwell’s 1984; and argues why control through reward is more sustainable than control through fear. Brave New World Revisited is 1984 vs. Brave New World. Also Ape and Essence is a planet of apes  (written ironically in 1948).

Ray Bradbury:  Fahrenheit 451,

Philip K. Dick:  Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Blade Runner), Rollerball, Man In High Castle

Stephen King:  Dark House, Running Man

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NON-FICTION: Political, Philosophical, Historical, & Biographical

Assault On Reason  – Al Gore 2007

The Revolution: A Manifesto
Dr. Ron Paul

Give Me Liberty – Naomi Wolf 2008

Harper’s Ferry: Strange Stories & Legends
Joseph Barry

8 Pillars of Greek Wisdom – by Stephen Bertman

Blackberry Cove Herbal – by Linda Rago

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FICTION: Fantasy, Mystery, Thriller & Horror

Lord of the Rings & The Hobbit
JRR Tolkien

Suicide Surprise
Noel Tavano

Doubtful Guest, Dwindling Party, Gashlycrumb Tinies, Haunted Tea-Cosy
Edward Gorey