Archive for success

Snobs Cry “Don’t Punish Success”

Posted in Commercial Corporations, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Ethics & Morals, Matras Quotes Tips, Music Reviews, news, Politics, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 29, 2019 by Drogo

I have heard the cries of the successfully wealthy and powerful, “Do not punish success.”; from the brilliant actor that satirizes Trump (Alec Baldwin), to the angry metal band that cut off their long hair in the name of maturity (Metallica). As a fan of both Baldwin and Metallica, I appreciate their artistic mastery of craft, and believe that if any one earned the right to be rich by working hard I am sure that they did; however to not understand that the very art that they did was often anti-authoritarian is mystifying to me. Perhaps fame blinds many to hypocrisy, as their same angry fighting spirit that got them there, wants to cling on to “what is rightfully, not wrongfully, theirs”? 

 

When I listen to Metallica’s music, and then i hear them speak about how they do not understand ‘this new desire to rebel against authority’, i wonder how out of touch they have to be to not have learned more wisdom from their own lyrics…. “Master of Puppets is pulling your strings”. To be fair to Metallica, I first heard the cries for mercy from the lead singer of Kiss in his auto-biography; as though it were so much easier to become rich back then, and luck has nothing to do with opportunities or hard work. Talent speaks for itself, and being successful at your craft means being able to sustain yourself enough to do it. Any wealth, power, and fame that comes with successful talent is just layers of responsibility that they can accept, but must let go of eventually, even if it has to be pried from their cold skeleton hands in the grave by robbers. If an archeologist preserves their remains clinging to their assets, ok fine.

 

Money and popularity makes people into gods, so if their worshipers are jealous there is really not much law abiding citizens can do. The gods can proclaim that jealousy should be punished, but not greed; and have their will carried out in the halls of justice, in favor of divine corporations over individuals. ‘Might is right, and weakness is wrong’; did this problem of human existence eat away at Nietzsche’s mind as his body gave way to illness? Ethics may be for the weak, but Jesus did promise that the meek shall inherit the earth. Promises, promises. I see no evidence that the rich are being punished more than average people. In reality evil seems to win by brutalizing those who cannot control them, even while their corruption pollutes the planet.

 

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Successful Leadership & Selling

Posted in Economics, Sustainability with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 29, 2015 by Drogo

10 Successful Traits

– based on an article by Dan Cassidy on Lifehack

1. commit to worthy goals

2. persist until you achieve goals

3. take responsibility to keep going

4. work harder, smarter, or differently

5. emulate case studies of success

6. believe in your goals

7. care for your health

8. rest, take breaks, and play

9. make mistakes and recover

10. adapt and learn

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21 Laws of Leadership – John Maxwell

I. Law Of the Lid: determine levels of effectiveness.
II. Law of Influence: cultivate influence.
III. Law of Process: develop daily, not in a day.
IV. Law of Navigation: chart the course, not just steer.
V. Law of Addition: serve others, don’t just lead or boss.
VI. Law of Solid Ground: establish trust.
VII. Law of Respect: gain strength from those weaker.
VIII. Law of Intuition: evaluate everything.
IX. Law of Magnetism: Who you are is who you attract.
X. Law of Connection: touch hearts, not just hands.
XI. Law of the Inner Circle: close friends determine potential.
XII. Law of Empowerment: share power with others.
XIII. Law of the Picture: people do what people see.
XIV. Law of Buy-in: people buy into a person with vision.
XV. Law of Victory: team cooperation should win.
XVI. Law of the Big Mo: Momentum moves group goals.
XVII. Law of Priorities: activity is not victory.
XVIII. Law of Sacrifice: A leader must give up, to go up.
XIX. Law of Timing: know when to lead, and when to serve.
XX. Law of Explosive Growth: lead leaders, not just followers.
XXI. Law of Legacy: train people for leadership succession.

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Selling 101 – Zig Ziglar

Once you have something to sell, find someone willing to buy. Deal skillfully with reluctant potential buyers. Persuade by asking, not telling; then engage what people care about, even if it is not a reason for buying ‘yet’. Selling is based on the buyer needing; use analysis, awareness, solutions, and satisfaction factors. Conduct comfortable ‘inner-views’ using sincere interest in POGO: Person, Organization, Goals, and Obstacles; it is mostly about them. Sell solutions to problems; ask to have. KISS to close; Keep It Simple Sales-person! When people say ‘no’, empathize with objections without believing the conclusion is final. Test objections, then move on. Manage your time, so that you do what you need to do, and do what you want to do. Most of your time will be spent on activities that do not directly make sales, but support your system.

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Do What You Want To Do

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization with tags , , on April 10, 2015 by Drogo

2013-01-08-alanwatts

Artistic Success

Posted in Crafts, Economics, Philosophy with tags , , , , , , , , on January 8, 2015 by Drogo

To an artist ‘success’ is always secondary to the inner need and desire to create. Even when artists are driven by desires to be rich and famous, determining their success is always an after-thought of hind-sight. The purpose of deciding what is successful is not just to apply award praise or sad regret, but more importantly such analysis concludes sustainable functionality or repetition of similar models. Insanity can be defined as repeating the same failed efforts again and again but expecting different results. To be sane we evaluate our efforts that work to achieve goals. Achievements are real success; however the problem with prioritizing success, is that inventors often fail over and over in order to innovate. This is why a practicing artist must push aside the ambiguity and hypocrisy of past and future labels and problems; and just be and do what they want. Artistic Success is part self-evaluation, part opinion of critics, and part completion of work itself; all of which matters less than our ‘will-to-make’.

Creation is success.

Yes, You are an Artist Too! (audio recording)

How we find success and happiness

Posted in Psychology, Religions with tags , , , , , , , , , , on November 9, 2014 by Drogo

We can only truly be happy the more we take steps to become closer to our spiritual source in the Universe. The closer we go towards one-ness and unity. It can be done through the purest forms of religion, although the organized structural part of it may take us away at times. I mean, through religion people have the opportunity to connect to their personal source of consciousness whether they realize it or not. Religion can be a tool to get to more consistent achievement, satisfaction, and joy. However, once ‘there’ in our spiritual hearts, religion can become a concrete form of rigid dogmatic belief, which often has been used to create personal guilt, neighborly strife, foreign persecution, and World conflict.

We know we can go into churches, books, hearts, and minds to find success and happiness. Since we know where to go to seek happiness all the discussion is about HOW to get there. Artists reach points in their performances where they cease to be operating as an individual, and reach a higher place of being (consciously and sub-consciously) while playing their music. Athletes get to a place where they let go of their conscious efforts, and operate as if their sport is being done for them. Striving to get to this place where we feeling immense union, love, and harmony can be done through numerous ways in the human experience. The true key to happiness is to pursue a path that will be able to bring you there (rather than away). Your investment must become deeply committed.

Secondly, in our need to return to one-ness, we can be lead to oppose separate-ness, or experiences that further create individualism. Wars, fighting, violence power struggles, control all are experiences because of separation. Therefore, as a way of ‘how’ to proceed towards success and happiness is to invest your life energies into the opposite from that which sets us ‘apart’. Involvement with peace making, environmental stewardship, conflict resolution, physical, emotional and energy healing, music & all art forms are all meaningful operations that lead towards greater happiness and success.

None of us live in a vacuum, and we certainly are individuals capable of either self-awareness or selfish greed, or both; we can change our minds and act against our best interests even during the course of a day. The 3rd dimensional material world and ego-mind play out here. We all have the choice to live in suffering, or to move towards union with a source. I think we must consider shifting our lives and activities away from ego-dominated selfish pursuits or single-minded competitive aspects; but more-so to meaningful unifying humanitarian measures to further our collective existence together.

written by Sir Jeffy the Spiritual Psychologist

edited by Drogo Empedocles

Signs of Success

Posted in Spiritual with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 20, 2013 by Drogo

(Inspired by working with the Harpers Ferry Healing Arts Clinic in 1994)

* Successful Happiness *

Smiling, Snickering, or even Laughing.

Thinking and acting like a child, without being childish.

Reducing fear, anger, and conflict in general.

Enjoying as many moments as possible.

Appreciation for as much as possible.

Accepting rather than Judging.

Connectedness with Nature.

Contentment with People.

Sustainable feelings of Love.

Less worry.

(This is was written by Drogo Empedocles for Creative Commons)

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Analysis of Apostles of Success

Posted in Book Reports, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Economics, History with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 15, 2013 by Drogo

Apostles of the Self-Made Man: Changing Concepts of Success in America

1965 book by John G. Cawelti – University of Chicago Phoenix Press – 280 pages

 Success

SUMMARY

This is a book about the popular culture of success in America. It discusses natural qualities of character, education, values, and needs of individuals and society. It is a decent American history of changing concepts of success; with a focus on three main sources: historic individuals, fictional figures, and manual guides. It uses literature as a source to reference social history.

In spite of their persistent devotion to the idea of success, Americans have differed greatly in the way they defined it. That is the subject of this book. – p.3

Though the self-made man wasn’t an American invention, Americans have cherished the notion of someone rising out of poverty and, through hard work and dedication, achieving at least a moderate amount of wealth and respect. Purely American icons such as Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson each wrote about the opportunity for anyone in a fluid American class system to grow through their own power towards a particular position in society. Yet, much like Abraham Lincoln in the tumultuous ante-bellum period and the Gilded Age’s robber barons, the self-made man appeared most notably in times of rapid change and transition . – C.1

Three Strands of American Success

  1. Religious – Protestant Work Ethic and pious morality

  2. Economic – wealth = success

  3. Complex Individual and Social Ethics and Dreams, often combining the first 2 stands

American society saw three main versions of the self-made man emerge in epitomizing the ideal of success. The first focused on a Protestant notion of “piety, frugality, and diligence” in fulfilling the duties of one’s occupation. This version suggested that a static, stable social order existed in which success was the attainment of respectability in this world and led to the assurance of salvation in the world to come. As strict Protestantism gave way to other, secular notions of success, this ideal began to fade away.

The second tradition placed a premium on a more economic emphasis of success. While the first focused on religious notions of grace and propriety, the second enlisted the purely lay qualities of aggressiveness, competitiveness, and forcefulness. As industrialization swept over the United States in the Gilded Age and beyond, people prescribed to this ideal of success beyond the scope of religion. The hierarchical structure of many new corporations demanded such qualities from their employees if they hoped to “climb the ladder of success.” The third type of success, was a combination of the former two; taking ethics and humility from religious loyalty, in an existential industrial work environment.

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For more of the report, click on the link here for SCOD Gallery Report with Chapter Links!

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