Archive for travel

SCOD as a Way of Life

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Interviews, SCOD Status Update Reports, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2019 by Drogo

Why SCOD works for me  – SCOD is not one specific place, it can be anywhere that fits it; more importantly SCOD is a way of life or thinking and being. I spent most of my life helping other people with their visions, mainly bosses, clients, or my parents where we had a property that combined our creations, but now that we sold our property im finally getting a chance to express my own thoughts with my work, so im content so long as i can do that. I like documenting the good work of others in communities for SCOD, and while i do it i see what fits with me. SCOD gives me a chance to investigate places without too much pressure to give up everything to join them, being a guest for a limited time seems sensible with low risk. My dedication is to my work, sometimes in cooperation with other partners in SCOD, or my own place again, if i find what fits me. SCOD villages of the future would be adaptable enough for all kinds of personalities and social situations, to allow places for permanent and transient flux sustainability. Until more potential for renewable energy with guaranteed basic living rights is realized in more places (in part thanks to more scod collabs); a safe bed-room, transport, and communication is all i need to live my adventure. – Drogo 2019

“Go out there and find the ones who have not given up on dreaming of a better tomorrow.” – Tomorrow Land

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u can do anything, here’s how i did

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing, Trips with tags , , , , , , , , on March 24, 2012 by growing togehter

here’s how i ….
traveled-  my mom drove my sis and i from FL to CT, we took a train to NYC and that’s how i stood on the tallest building there.
my two friends split the cost of gas to CA and back, so i drove my car from coast to coast.  i stopped at the Grand Canyon on the way back, cause it was on the map.  for 25$ and a few nights of sleeping in my car.  i saw a deer jump off the edge and when i looked over i saw a circle of rocks, so i jumped too.  that’s how i came to jump off the Grand Canyon and rock climb about 50ft straight back up.  that was the scariest thing i’d ever done till i found myself walking on the side of a snow covered volcano in New Zealand.
i got to NZ because i gave up on getting my AA and was told that at 25yo i should move out of my mothers house.  i took the rest of my student loan, sold my truck and most of my stuff, got a bit of $ from my family.  i got my passport and looked up online how to get the 12month working holiday visa  and took a plane to NZ.  little over 4,000USD.  i got off the plane and found the information booth which helped me get a phone card/discount card for hostels.  then i got on to a bus to the city of Auckland.  after walking less than a block from the bus stop and into a hostel where i booked a room for 2 nights, i realized that i had way too much stuff.  i gave about half away after sleeping for over a day.  it was that easy.  a passport, visa (i got online for free) and a plane ticket!
the rest was talking to people.  other travelers tell you more than you need or ever care to know.  the locals tell you things you would have never thought to ask.  the best part is no matter where your from, what you do or don’t know, we can all communicate!  i met germans that knew less english then i know german, spanish kids who knew only spanish, french guys who only know french and some spanish, and we all expressed ourselves and understood the basics.  lots of hand movements and pointing and drawing pics and showing on the map or online.  one kid had an app on his cell that translated what he typed.
i spent all my $ in about 4 months and never got a job there.  i traveled for free much of the time.  couchsurfing.org  WWOOF (google it) and standing on the side of the road with a sign got me all over two islands!

traveling can be free.
most of it’s just about asking.  i asked the internet for a New Zealand visa and after a few clicks found it.  i asked my friends about going to CA and OH and then we went, sometimes sharing gas cost other times not.  i said that it’d be cool to see this or that and next thing i knew i was there.  many times i got asked if i’d like to… and it was as easy as saying yes, or even pointing out that i would love to if it’s cheap or free.

“it never hurts to ask!  what’s the worst that happens?  you get told no, well if you never ask it’s as good as a no.”

and i’d add, just keep asking, ask different ways and to as many people as you meet.  tell the world what you desire to see, do, or have!  the worst that could happen is you have to make or do it yourself.  likely tho you’ll end up asking the right person at some point and they will the ones to help you get it.

so that’s how i’ve seen America, Jamica, New Zealand, Camon Island’s, Mexico and it’s how i’ve climbed volcanoes, jumped out of a plane, camped in the forest and in a city, seem water falls, sat in how water rivers drinking wine by moon light, canoed for a week, swam in the oceans, went to a ren-fair in NZ and a few in the states, and that’s how i plane to see the rest of the world!

so… anyone going to Europe?  tibet?  china?  how about WA?  ok, maybe just around FL, i want to get out to tampa and back up to st. augustine, or just a canoe trip or camping weekend?

p.s. megabus is cheap for the east coast of USA, train passes are the cheapest for europe and hitching is best in NZ and AUS

safe traveling, be smart, think

Tourists

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Critical Commentary of Civilization with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 6, 2010 by Drogo

Tourist – annoying visitor that has often travelled great distances, often wearing non-conforming clothing, and carrying cameras and recording equipment to document their adventures and tours. Also an important contributor towards the local economies they visit.

Although tourists are civilian, members of the military qualify as tourists when they are not wearing their uniforms during “off-duty” leave. Even if the military member is stationed at a nearby base, they when they visit a civilian location as civilians they are therefore tourists, although they are subject to military law. Therefore if I were going to be a tourist in a friendly Country, I would rather go as a civilian. But if I am visiting a dangerous Country, I would rather be under the protection of my own military. LOL

Hippies

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Environmentalism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 21, 2010 by Drogo

Hippies

Hippies are people too. Sometimes we forget because the hippie movement fell out of favor only a decade after it began. Why? Because hippies were different, hippies are made fun of, and often financially powerless because by definition they gave up desire for those social and political constructs and aspirations. Also it is popular to say they “stink” because they often smell different due to bathing and patchouli practices. It is popular to make fun of astrology, and “new age” alchemical spiritual beliefs. It is the natural tendency to make fun of people that are different than normal standards, by birth or by choice, and to be biased against them.

So “hippy” has become a derogatory label.  There was a decade when many believed and felt they were part of larger revolution, and not just a fashion taboo. Others will always believe that their idealism was flawed, and they were always just criminal bums. Those people are usually called different names by those they call hippies, to be fair.

The popular Hippie Movement during the 1960s, had evolved from the 1950s counter-culture of hipster beatniks, and embraced a revolutionary return to naturalist folk traditions. Peace was a major motivating factor for many people to become a hippy. Environmentalism, drug use, and alternative lifestyle freedoms were also very dominant aspects of the movement.

The peace symbol was developed in the UK as a logo for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, and was embraced by U.S. anti-war protestors during the 1960s. Originally the “V” finger sign stood for Victory (a return to peace) in WWII, but ironically was adopted by hippies to remind people about the joys of peace. Hippies were mostly pacifists and many participated in non-violent political protests, such as marches and demonstrations for civil rights, liberties, and peace.

The degree of political involvement varied widely among hippies, from those who were active in non-violent demonstrations, to the more anti-authority street aggression of the Yippies (the most politically active hippie sub-group). The active yippy political rebels led to underground resistance groups like “The Weathermen”, and often operated violently as anarchists. Pacifist hippies tend to disagree with hateful tactics.

The Hippie Movement continues to the present day, but began to decline in the 1970s with the emergence of new popular movements like Disco, and later was rejected by Hip-hop breakdance, Goth, Punk, and Yuppism in the 1980s under the hyper-inflation of Reaganomics. The economic bubble of the 1980s (which revived the 1950s industrial enthusiasm) had a lot to do with the cultural supremacy of Cocaine.

The multi-culturalism of the 1990s was a peaceful integration of many colorful hippy values like celebrating ethnic diversity and environmentalism, with modern technology and the enthusiasm of the commercial 1980s. Improvements in transportation allowed these benefits of travel, including the popularity of tattoos. However, this positive zeitgeist was smothered by the Military Industrial Complex under Bush II.