Archive for USA

95 Million Americans Not Employed

Posted in jobs, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2016 by Drogo

95,055,000 Americans have no employer-job income in 2016!

For some reason, the public media ‘Unemployment Reports’ from the US Department of Labor are not listing the largest and most important number. According to their own data charts (which do not copy well as a direct link for specific info, perhaps on purpose) the Bureau of Labor Statistics ‘Household Data’ Table A-1; in November 2016 there were over 95 Million Americans ‘not employed’ total. To clarify, over 95,000,000 adults have no ‘outside-the-family-home’ income (using the ‘not in the labor force’ chart). Many adult workers have no formal income in America. Over 38 million men and almost 57 million women, of those jobless are adults over the age of 16 (using the seasonally adjusted charts).

Here is an article link that explains the ‘Real Unemployment Rate‘.

The total population of the USA is 324,954,000. The US civilian population of adult citizens between the ages of 15-65 is apx. 206,189,000 (male + female) [Wikipedia]; of those 152 million are ’employed’ (includes over 7 million unemployed), and 95 million are not included. About 152 million employees are having to support 95 million other adults of all ages AND all the 62 million children. Although we have men and women working formal or informal paying or volunteer jobs, the ratio of income is perhaps about the same as before Equal Rights (152/157). Worse yet the economy shows no signs of improving, and based on the facts appears to be getting worse every year (accounting for inflation ratios).

There is a pattern trend in relation to the number of years (from 1975-2016) and the unemployed numbers (58 million to 95 million). In 1975 the total ‘jobless population’ was 58,627,000 (over 16 years of age). So since 1975 the ratio of population to non-employed has at least doubled. Our total population has grown in that time (1975-2016) only a little over 100 million more; therefore the disproportionate numbers means that although the total population only grew by 1/3, the jobless population grew by 1/2. ‘Fact-checkers’ claim numbers not included (people in school or elderly over 65) reduce 95 million to 20 million, but I am not convinced and have not yet verified their numbers [Politifact]. I believe counting students over 16 as potential PAID labor force is fair (as they should not be slaves), so if we subtract 40 million elders (population over 65 not verified) that still leaves 55 million adults with no official income that should be getting a living wage if we believe that people have a right to life.

This data makes a parabola chart showing perpetual rapid job loss by the millions within decades. In one generation the masses could all be slaves to corporate plutocracy, with no ability to vote on anything except American Idol, will own less and less property, and will become more impoverished with each generation. One conclusion could be that we are indeed long overdue for major reform, we have been misled by our leaders, and real revolution is needed. The Green Party, SCOD, and others are by necessity already exploring alternative grass-roots economies. We should also break up the Federal government into smaller sections of states (by time-zones), each with democratic directly elected presidential councils. The system trend resembles a Plutocracy that keeps the masses enslaved only to benefit the wealthy elites.

jobless-chart-copy

Congratulations President Obama

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization, Politics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 22, 2013 by Drogo

I write this tribute to our first African-American President on the day of his 2nd Term Inauguration. I proudly voted for him this time. Last time I proudly voted for my Green Party Candidate Cynthia McKinney, who would have been our first Black and first Woman President. Before that I was Kucinich all the way. Many whites forget that it was not long ago that our culture treated blacks as property, because they were our slaves. Not only are we mostly ignorant about this history, it is almost impossible for most of us to feel their suffering, never mind trying to understand that we should celebrate the fact that we have a kind, intelligent black representative leading us now. It is true we can argue that maybe Obama is actually more white socially, but he is a decent negotiator between the two cultures.

Finally I feel the USA is back on track with social liberties, picking up from the 1990s and all the damage that was done in between, regarding racial, ethical, and cultural freedoms in general. Considering what a president has to deal with, I like Barack just fine.

Sure there are policies I disagree with. For example I do not threaten people with nukes or guns. So I am not as conservative as Obama on many issues; and perhaps I would have not bailed out all the banks and auto companies, but I remember the political pressure that was put on him by all those that believe in Wall Street and all that shit, and I am sure there is some bribery going on there to make it all function. I do not gamble like that, but obviously those rich people do. The worst things about Obama (and JFK) is that for all their kindness, they tend to go along with whatever the military wants, so I question everything from Drone Strikes to the regular military shit.

Ok I would also legalize Pot.

Besides those issues, I agree with Obama on Gun Restrictions, Gun Rights, Gay Rights, Equal Rights, Ethics, etc… and most of all Environmental Protection, Alternative Fuels, and Renewable Energy in that we need more of these things. I think we need more radical change faster, but fast change can have worse side effects sometimes than slow change, in a culture where almost half of the voters do not want those changes. So there you have it.

– Drogo

“A decade of War is now ending. Peace need not be maintained by constant War.”     – Obama.

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u can do anything, here’s how i did

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing, Trips with tags , , , , , , , , on March 24, 2012 by growing togehter

here’s how i ….
traveled-  my mom drove my sis and i from FL to CT, we took a train to NYC and that’s how i stood on the tallest building there.
my two friends split the cost of gas to CA and back, so i drove my car from coast to coast.  i stopped at the Grand Canyon on the way back, cause it was on the map.  for 25$ and a few nights of sleeping in my car.  i saw a deer jump off the edge and when i looked over i saw a circle of rocks, so i jumped too.  that’s how i came to jump off the Grand Canyon and rock climb about 50ft straight back up.  that was the scariest thing i’d ever done till i found myself walking on the side of a snow covered volcano in New Zealand.
i got to NZ because i gave up on getting my AA and was told that at 25yo i should move out of my mothers house.  i took the rest of my student loan, sold my truck and most of my stuff, got a bit of $ from my family.  i got my passport and looked up online how to get the 12month working holiday visa  and took a plane to NZ.  little over 4,000USD.  i got off the plane and found the information booth which helped me get a phone card/discount card for hostels.  then i got on to a bus to the city of Auckland.  after walking less than a block from the bus stop and into a hostel where i booked a room for 2 nights, i realized that i had way too much stuff.  i gave about half away after sleeping for over a day.  it was that easy.  a passport, visa (i got online for free) and a plane ticket!
the rest was talking to people.  other travelers tell you more than you need or ever care to know.  the locals tell you things you would have never thought to ask.  the best part is no matter where your from, what you do or don’t know, we can all communicate!  i met germans that knew less english then i know german, spanish kids who knew only spanish, french guys who only know french and some spanish, and we all expressed ourselves and understood the basics.  lots of hand movements and pointing and drawing pics and showing on the map or online.  one kid had an app on his cell that translated what he typed.
i spent all my $ in about 4 months and never got a job there.  i traveled for free much of the time.  couchsurfing.org  WWOOF (google it) and standing on the side of the road with a sign got me all over two islands!

traveling can be free.
most of it’s just about asking.  i asked the internet for a New Zealand visa and after a few clicks found it.  i asked my friends about going to CA and OH and then we went, sometimes sharing gas cost other times not.  i said that it’d be cool to see this or that and next thing i knew i was there.  many times i got asked if i’d like to… and it was as easy as saying yes, or even pointing out that i would love to if it’s cheap or free.

“it never hurts to ask!  what’s the worst that happens?  you get told no, well if you never ask it’s as good as a no.”

and i’d add, just keep asking, ask different ways and to as many people as you meet.  tell the world what you desire to see, do, or have!  the worst that could happen is you have to make or do it yourself.  likely tho you’ll end up asking the right person at some point and they will the ones to help you get it.

so that’s how i’ve seen America, Jamica, New Zealand, Camon Island’s, Mexico and it’s how i’ve climbed volcanoes, jumped out of a plane, camped in the forest and in a city, seem water falls, sat in how water rivers drinking wine by moon light, canoed for a week, swam in the oceans, went to a ren-fair in NZ and a few in the states, and that’s how i plane to see the rest of the world!

so… anyone going to Europe?  tibet?  china?  how about WA?  ok, maybe just around FL, i want to get out to tampa and back up to st. augustine, or just a canoe trip or camping weekend?

p.s. megabus is cheap for the east coast of USA, train passes are the cheapest for europe and hitching is best in NZ and AUS

safe traveling, be smart, think

CAHOKIA: North America’s Largest Woodhenge & Temple Mound

Posted in Historic Architecture, Pagan with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 11, 2010 by Drogo

CAHOKIA MOUNDS PARK

Cahokia Mounds is currently a State Historic Site. Cahokia is the area of an ancient city built around 600–1400 CE. It is near present day Collinsville, Illinois across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, Missouri.

The Cahokia Mounds were named after a clan of historic Illiniwek people living in the area when the first French explorers arrived in the 17th century. As this was centuries after Cahokia was abandoned by its original inhabitants, the Cahokia were not necessarily descendants of the original Mississippian people. The city’s original name is unknown.

The 2,200 acre site originally included 120 man-made earthwork mounds over an area of six square miles, although only 80 survive. Cahokia Mounds is the largest archaeological site related to the Mississippian Late Woodland culture, which developed advanced societies in North America, centuries before the arrival of Europeans.

It is a National Historic Landmark and designated site for state protection. In addition, it is one of only twenty UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the territory of the United States. It is the largest American Indian earthen construction in the Americas north of Mexico.

They used woven baskets to move most of the earth to build the mounds and plazas. In every culture there are usual social, political, spiritual, and defense reasons to place buildings on raised bases. In the case of Cahokia, there is an added reason: the site is on a flood plain near the Mississippi River.

Monks Mound

Monks Mound is the largest structure and central focus of the city. It is a massive mound with four terraces, 10 stories tall, and the largest man-made earthen mound north of Mexico. Facing south, it is 92 feet high, 951 feet long and 836 feet wide.

Excavation on the top of Monks Mound has revealed evidence of a large building, likely a temple used by the Chief and shaman for residence and public functions. This building was about 105 feet long and 48 feet wide, and could have been as much as 50 feet high. It was about 5,000 square feet.

Cahokia Woodhenge

This woodhenge, like others found in Europe, was a circle of posts used for cosmic alignments relevant to agriculture. It stood to the west of Monk’s Mound. Archaeologists discovered Woodhenge during excavation, and noted that the placement of posts marked solstices and equinoxes. Woodhenge was rebuilt several times during the urban center’s roughly 300-year history. There were probably other woodhenges in America over the centuries, as one was discovered near Mound 72, south of Monks Mound.

A beaker found in a pit near the winter solstice post bore a circle and cross symbol that for many Native Americans symbolizes the Earth and the four cardinal directions. Radiating lines probably symbolized the sun, as they have in countless other civilizations. During excavation of Mound 72, archaeologists found a birdman burial for a leader, and 250 other skeletons from around 1000 CE. Other mounds had workshops for copper smiting and trading.

Star Gazer ‘Keep Looking Up!’

Posted in Memorials / Obituaries / Epitaphs, Nature Studies with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 3, 2010 by Drogo

Jack Horkheimer, The ‘Star Gazer’ Remembered….


Jack Foley Horkheimer, died on August 20, 2010. He will be missed by millions, yet remembered in the night sky. This is a memorial essay on the immortal ‘Star Gazer’ (‘Star Hustler’).

Jack Horkheimer was the most recognized public figure to enthusiastically advocate amateur observation of the night sky, for generations. His 5 minute television show began on Florida PBS stations in 1976. In 1985 his show became a national PBS phenomenon, usually aired before station sign-off. It was originally called ‘Star Hustler’, but was changed to ‘Star Gazer’ in 1997.

This is how each show began:

Some people hustle pool,
Some people hustle cars,
But have you ever heard about
The man who hustles stars?

The show’s theme music is Isao Tomita’s electronic rendition of Claude Debussy’s Arabesque No. 1, from Tomita’s album Snowflakes Are Dancing. After the introduction, Jack would say “Greetings, greetings, fellow star gazers!” and end the show with his signature closing line, “Keep looking up!”

Jack was Executive Director of the Miami Museum of Science and Space Transit Planetarium, in Florida for over 35 years. Horkheimer was the foremost commentator on all astronomy related happenings nationwide, affecting millions of viewers with enthusiasm for the cosmos, and passion for our relationship to the Universe. He was truly one of a kind.

Generously his shows are available online, so his national contributions need not fade with time. He truly is among the great advocates of public astronomy, like Stephen Hawking and Neil deGrasse Tyson. At the time of his death at 72 years old, Jack had made thousands of shows, and inspired many people to “keep looking up”. There was no other weekly show on TV that preformed the same function as ‘Star Gazer’, and it remains unique.

2003 BP Solarex Tour

Posted in Alternative Architecture, Sustainability with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 29, 2010 by Drogo

The BP Solarex Facility Tour in Frederick,  MD

November 2003 – These are the notes.

Jefferson County, WV residents toured the BP Solarex facility in Frederick, Maryland. In attendance were John Henry Dale, Michael Shor, and Walton Stowell Jr. & Sr.. The following information is based on notes taken during the tour and official Solarex publications. Special thanks to Public Relations representative Debby Burgon. They did not allow photographs inside.

Although Solarex is now owned by British Petroleum, the Solarex plant was owned by Amoco & Enron in the 1980’s.  Now BP Solar boasts that their “Projects Group designed and supplied over 50,000 systems (totaling 70MW) and managed over 25,000 installations (nearly 15MW).”, and “completed installations in more than 150 countries (a record unmatched by any other company in the industry)”.

First on the tour was the Casting Room and the Sizing Room.  Michael asked what Silicon cost per # . The ‘crystalline operations’ and ‘tech center’ contained blocks of ingot, crystalex controllers, and a large cutting room  1=> 25 bricks / casting station vats.  An ‘ingot crusher’ machine cranked away as a loud speaker echoed in the docking bay.  Terms such as ‘silicon powder’ and ‘top-cut’ were discussed and cylinders were cleaned with corrosive chemical bath.  Next was the ‘hot form block melting room’.

The ‘wafer cutting room’ contained many purple, pink, orange ear plugs; white suits, grey slop gloves goo, and blue slippers.  This is where ‘template calibration’ for the solar cells took place also.

Next an Airlock leads into a blue floor, where wafer separation, cleaning, and setting begin.  Automated cleaning and etching stations occurred in glass tanks.  (SiN) Silicon Nitride  240 microns = 3-4 sheets thickness.  A violet / dark blue wafer coating with “silver paste” was then baked in aluminum.  These would go to a drying furnace in front and back lines with automated tooling systems.

multi- & mono- solar cells  (multi-cells are darker, absorb more sun, more efficient)  “silicon is dangerous”

A large final room housed machine plates that mounted bar stripes (bus bar) with tabbing ribbons, and negative / positive copper wire with silver coating.  Then there were assembly-soldering operations for the complete solar panels; which were then laminated, and ‘cassettes’ were loaded into a matrix machine with roller knobs.  Contained in soldered back-matting is dios wiring and label black caulking buettle. Current / voltage testing / reading SPI sun Simulator BP 380U. The panels are cleaned, flashed, and boxed in argon @ 23.8 degrees.  NRE National Renewable Energy

The cost of a solar system is directly proportional to how much energy you require.  Small cabin systems start at a few 1000 dollars.  A typical household system could cost anywhere from $10,000 to $40,000. “Clean Power Estimator” = evaluates $ saved contact section to discuss design with a distributor. Array combo – Inverter – Utility kw/h meter.

Currently prices are still not economically feasible or comparable with grid power in most states. Illinois has a very limited subsidy program for homeowner, like in Japan and Germany. Skylight connector modules have (leads) silicon-nitride covering over wafers.

Some questions remain:

“What percentage of energy used to produce solar panels in the plant, is provided by solar energy?”

“Why is taking so long to open more plants?” and “Why do you now have a barbed wire fence?”

“Why did you cut over half of your workforce in 2010?” (update)

2010 BP Solarex Job Cuts

Oil Company cuts jobs at Solarex, BP “Big Plans” for the Future!

Posted in Sustainability with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 29, 2010 by Drogo

Oil Company cuts only Solar Panel manufacturing plant it has on the East Coast by 2/3 in 2010

Blame it on poor economic bubbles created by giants of industry and banking.

Blame it on anything you want, but the facts are sad regarding our plans to improve ourselves in the 21st Century. Besides all the economic and political problems we have been facing in housing, banking, health care, insurance, and jobs; forget about issues of War in the Middle East, Education and Terrorism; one industrial plant stood alone on the entire East Coast of the United States of America. That was BP Solar. It had been restructured and growing in the past decade. Now that hope is diminished by more than 2 thirds.

SCOD was proudly given a tour through the plant years ago, with some hope for the future of alternative energy and good American jobs. Now we are being thrown back to the Reagan years, where it was popular to make fun of Jimmy Carter’s environmental energy policies and tax cuts for solar panels. Who needs alternatives when America is addicted to Oil and stubbornly proud of it?

BP Solarex justifies cutting 320 workers because labor is cheaper in India and China. About 110 workers will remain as sales distribution and engineering staff. Maryland State Government had already dedicated over ten million in stimulus credits last year, but BP said it was not enough based on current market problems. They have already shut down plants in Australia and Spain.

This reinforces my opinion that alternative energy plants need to be run by more public utility companies, and not fossil fuel companies. Rules should be put in place to enforce companies to fire CEO’s and managers when “unforeseen economic problems” arise and cannot be handled, rather than lay-off workers.

Is there no rehab for Oil Addiction? Step One is admitting we have a problem. What is Step Two?

Other Solar Panel Links:

SCOD Tour of BP Solarex (2003 notes)

SCOD Tour of BP Solarex (video slideshow with narration)

Frederick News Post Article

BP Solar Website