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West Virginia Coal Mine Wars

Posted in Economics, History, Military, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on April 5, 2017 by Drogo

Chronology of the WV Coal Mine Wars

1912 – West Virginia Miners strike in Paint Creek and Cabin Creek, and are evicted from their houses; tent colonies are set up.

1913 – The Blue Moose Special train passes through the encampment of Cabin Creek and opens fire on the unarmed inhabitants. A reconciliation between the coal operators and the miners leads to the right to organize in Cabin Creek and Paint Creek.

1919 – An armed march by some 5,000 miners is organized on Lens Creek with the intention of overtaking Logan county and establishing a union. The march was abandoned some days later when the miners learned that federal troops would be sent in.

1920 – Seven Baldwin-Felts detectives, two miners and the Mayor Testerman are killed in the Matewan Massacre. Sid Hatfield, the Chief of Police of Matewan who was involved in the shooting, is charged with the deaths of the detectives.

1921 – Matewan Chief murdered in public. Sid Hatfield and Ed Chambers are gunned down on the steps of the McDowell County courthouse by C.E. Lively, a Baldwin-Felts (Pinkerton) detective. Lively is never convicted of the crime.

Though tensions had been simmering for years, the immediate catalyst for the uprising was the unpunished murder of Sid Hatfield, police chief of Matewan, At a rally on August 7, Mother Jones called on the miners to march into Logan and Mingo counties and set up the union by force. Armed men began gathering at Lens Creek, near Marmet in Kanawha County on August 20, and by four days later up to 13,000 had gathered and began marching towards Logan County. Meanwhile, the reviled Sheriff of Logan County, Don Chafin, had begun to set up defenses on Blair Mountain.

The second armed march of the miners took place, with the same intent as the first; to reach Logan County, overthrow the crooked Sheriff Don Chafin and organize a union. What would become known as the Battle of Blair Mountain was composed of some 10,000-15,000 armed miners in total, marching from Lens Creek in Kanawha County, to Logan County, some sixty-five miles away.

The WV Mine Wars end at the Battle of Blair Mountain where Don Chafin and 1,500 men were waiting for the miners. There was sporadic fighting for a week with hundreds of deaths. The miners eventually disbanded when 2,000 troops, aerial forces as well as chemical warfare troops converged at Blair Mountain. The rebellion was forced to surrender, and lay down arms.

The Battle of Blair Mountain was the largest armed insurrection since the Civil War, and the largest organized armed uprising in American labor history. It led almost directly to the labor laws currently in effect in the United States of America. It was the final act in a series of violent clashes that have also (confusedly) been termed the Red Neck War, from the color of neck-scarves worn by the miners, and the likely impetus of the common usage (originally Scottish term Red-neck) in the vernacular of the United States.

*

During the American Mine Wars of the 1920s, and the period that followed, liberal Union moderates (Democrat Centrists) argued they could produce concrete benefits for workers much sooner than radical Socialists who planned to overthrow capitalism in the future. Left Wing politics began to move right towards Center, as unions negotiated with company bosses; union leaders began to get paid more as they demanded more dues from paychecks, and workers began to see less effective representation.

In the 21st Century, Mayor Kip Stowell of Harpers Ferry, WV and other local liberals and historians voted to preserve the Charles Town Jailhouse. The modern jailhouse building was used to jail General Bill Blizzard, during his trial for ‘Treason’ (armed insurrection terrorism like John Brown). It was scheduled to be demolished by the Republicans in office. The jail was saved by replacing them with Democratic County Commissioners.

In 2005, the West Virginia Archives and History Commission voted unanimously to recommend to the National Park Service that 1,600 acres of Blair Mountain be included on the National Register. Coal mining companies and nearby landowners promptly sued to overturn the nomination. The Sierra Club moved to join the suit, and in May 2006 a West Virginia judge granted the Club’s participation. That same month, the National Trust for Historic Preservation placed the Blair Mountain battlefield on its list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Places. The United Mine Workers union also came out in support of the National Register listing because of its importance to the labor movement.

(more research to come….)

Bibliography:  When Miners March, by Bill Blizzard; Thunder In The Mountains, by Lon Savage; WV Mine Wars, by David Corbin; Battle of Blair Mountain, by Robert Shogun & Howard Lee

SCOD audio reading of this Essay on Mixcloud

PBS Video Documentary of the WV Coal MINE WARS – covers much of the history

Coal Mine Wars

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SCOD Report 2015 Fall – Quest for New Cahokia

Posted in ecovillages, Organic Development, SCOD Status Update Reports with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on September 28, 2015 by Drogo

Aeyla and Drogo conducted a long-distance road-trip vacation-sabbatical from Maryland to Missouri, for the purpose of scouting various sites for case studies and potential projects. First Cahokia was visited and studied for historic perspective on environmental architecture.

Cahokia=mound

Then the Boe family farm at Schoen Ridge was visited to investigate potential for a medieval long-house and eco-village. Finally on the way back home, Mark Twain’s boyhood home was toured for literary, economic, and social wisdom. In Indiana, we visited Pat Long; who took us to  Traders Point Creamery: Organic Gardens and Green Architecture (see Barns & Restaurant in photo above). Many other adventures were had along the way, but those stories are for another time when a more detailed account can be recorded.

0924151232a

Sometimes you need to get lost to find yourself; because you can find things while being lost, or lose things when found. Found objects can be lost, and lost objects can be found. A full spectrum of lost and found. Animals have agendas like food and dominance , but are easier to handle. People are like dogs, sometimes they keep trying to bite me, regardless of how i am. Nature is not fair, but compassion is priceless.

All the most important SCOD factors are present with the Boe property. The Boe family homestead is a working farm run by the family with NO full-time paid workers; so it truly is a small family farm of apx. 80 acres and 50-70 animals (fluctuates). The largest city nearby is St. Joseph. The Boe farm is north of Savannah, south of Ravenwood (Ravensborg?), and adjacent to the village of Rosendale (whose buildings are selling for ultra low prices of $500-$1000).

Modest Proposal for Fee of Services as Architect:

We can list all our concerns over the months, and work out issues during scheduled and paid meetings, so we dont waste tons of time in endless debates. we could schedule Longhouse meetings for just before Equinoxes and Solstices, so 4x a year or when funds or needs are low only once a year. perhaps i can only charge for changes and additions, and trade the main drawings for future ability to live there for free for several months or something. Pay shows respect of commitment to a project, beyond the practical need to pay bills. paying me for each meeting, will allow client control on their budget. At $20 an hour, meetings should be reasonable to do things gradually. we can do meetings on skype, or phone, or chatting with text on facebook or email. friends that are like family, loved ones, are special clients with whom there is a trust of sharing, and options should be patiently felt out and pressure alleviated, even for final decisions when they are organically arrived at by all. my role is still the same as before the trip, i dont want to micromanage a scod project without pay or owning it, BUT i can say visiting did clarify the viability of the site and the family’s sincerity towards concept and kindness for sure. In addition, Karen’s volunteering posting in SCOD group certainly proves she believes in the concepts intellectually; but there is no funding for those of us running that social media aspect.

In the mean time; I recommend the Boe family to save money; and collect, cut, and store wood to dry on site: 2″ large flat slabs for tables and beams; 4x4s, 6x6s, 12×12″ etc at various lengths as long as possible. i think we will work things out as we have thus far, continuing to organically define our collaborative art to make everyone happy. There will always be more to do, in a world of ‘way too much’, but we can take breaks and remember to play.

African / Egyptian Origin Stories Summary

Posted in Pagan, Religions with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 22, 2013 by Drogo

The African Continent is our birth place, and oldest known homeland. In Africa the earliest humans first began worshiping spirit deities (between 7,000,000-100,000 BC). Early tribes were all hunters and gatherers, until domesticated animals and agriculture sometime after the Ice Ages (10,000 BC). It is the largest continent, with 5 major regions, and 54 countries. The earliest African written records come from Egypt in North Africa (3,300 BC). Bantu languages spread from West-Central Africa to Swahili East-South Africa (1000 BC – 500 AD). In South Africa the San tribe lived there before the Zulu. West Africa had the Akan, Edo, Yoruba and Igbo tribes. According to statistics, Abrahamic religions dominate modern Africa; yet an indigenous religious foundation remains, passed down orally for generations, to be practiced today, and forever. Tribal African mythologies are an eternal human heritage.

 

Egyptian, North Africa

Tomb hieroglyphics, images, and writings (2780–2250 BC) tell of many creator gods and various legends. The World of Egypt was created in diverse ways according to different areas. The World emerged from an infinite, lifeless Sea when the Sun rose for the first time. Different myths attributed the creation to different gods: the primordial Ogdoad Eight, the self-engendered God Atum, his offspring the contemplative Ptah, and the mysterious, transcendent God Amun.

Egyptian history begins with the first man (Phoroneus) and woman (Niobe), and after the Deluge with Deucalion and Pyrrha.

Niger River Bantu, Ivory Coast Akan, West Africa

The terracotta Nok culture (1000 BC – 200 AD), evolved into Yoruba. Olorun created human destiny (Ayanmo), and physical reality (Aye). Humans pray to their connected spirits (Ori-Orun-Inu), and reincarnate, to eventually return to Olorun’s Spirit Realm (Orun-Rere). Those who lose their way are in the ethereal Realm of Broken Pottery-Shards (Orun-Apadi). Akan traditions stress living in harmony with the Universe. Universal Harmony can be preserved by maintaining proper relationships with all beings in daily life. Akan pantheism includes a creator deity (Nyame), local spirits (abosom), and ancestor spirits (samanfo). Akan prefer to pray using fetishes (suman) to the lesser deity spirits, regarding luck. Human souls have three aspects: immortality, personality, and matrilineage.

 

Kuba (Bushongo) of Congo Zaire, Central Africa

Mother Earth and her husband, Heaven, were created by the creator deity, Mbomba. The couple used to live together, but after a terrible fight Heaven left Earth and they have been apart ever since. Goddess of Lightning caused trouble on Earth, so she was sent back to the Sky. She occasionally returns to bring fire to the Earth.

 

Kenya, East Africa

The god of the Akamba people is the Strong Lord. He is a merciful King of spirits. Strong Lord helps humans occasionally with consolation and sustenance. But he is also a god of judgment and vengeance. Distributor Asa Mwatuangi. Creator Mulungu. Fashioner Mumbi.

 

Zulu, South Africa

Zulu religion has many deities associated with animals or natural phenomena. Unkulunkulu (Greatest One) is the Creator God of humanity. He was created in the reeds of Swamp World Uhlanga, before he came to Earth. Sky Father Umvelinqangi (First One) is god of thunder and earthquakes. River-Snake Goddess Mamlambo is deadly. Nomkhumbulwane is goddess of rainbows, agriculture, rains, and ale.

Edo_ivory_mask

Organic Design by Frank Lloyd Wright

Posted in Alternative Architecture, Arts (Design & Performance), Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Individuals / Members / Monsters / Creative Writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 2, 2011 by Drogo

Essay on Frank Lloyd Wright’s Organic Architecture

Taliesin

Fallingwater

Broadacre City

 

American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, borrowed the word ‘Organic’ from his mentor Louis Sullivan. Wright began expressing his own vision of how organic nature applies to design. He tried to define ‘Organic Architecture’ in words, but the truest expression will always be in his designs and how they relate to the landscape.

 

Taliesin East & West

Frank Lloyd Wright formed the Taliesin Fellowship dedicated to organic design, education, and spiritual theory and practice. It later evolved into the FLW Foundation, and Taliesin Architects continued after Wright’s death. Wright built two small Communities based on his designs and theories. Taliesin East was built first on 600 acres in Wisconsin. Then Taliesin West was built on 600 acres in Arizona. Both developments respected the landscape by leaving much of it natural, while fitting in artistic architecture using site features. Both remained in a constant state of evolution during Wright’s lifetime.

 

Fallingwater

Fallingwater was a unique residence designed by Wright which show-cases his Organic Architecture. The natural organic landscape meets his organic designs above a waterfall. I was awarded a student residency there in high school, and every day for weeks we went down to the cold waters of Bear Run to wake up and begin our sketches and studies. Inside the house, concrete rests on stone, and the woods are seen through generous windows. That house has more of a give and take between the architecture and the landscape (including the water) than most other modern buildings in the World.

 

Broadacre City

Broadacre City was designed to show how various types of buildings should be organized in urban planning, using Organic Architecture. The hypothetical City was 4 square miles and published first in his Disappearing City, 1932 and continued to evolve until his death in 1959. One important rule was that the tallest buildings (sky-scrapers) should have enough open space around them so their shadows do not fall upon other buildings. Another factor was giving most residents one acre to build their own houses based on Usonian models. It was an effort to take the new concept of suburbs to a Utopian extreme by furthering the concept of combining rural and urban while striving to keep the best of both. Broadacre decentralized urban design, and lay grid upon rural country; advocating that the desire for suburban life be fully granted. Mass transportation would still be available at stations, but freedom was maintained through the use of individual vehicles on the roads and in the air.

 

 

West Virginia Camp Fires

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Legal / Laws, Nature Studies with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 13, 2010 by Drogo

WV State Spring Fire Laws 2010:
1. All outdoor burning is prohibited between 7 am – 4 pm.

2. All outdoor fires must have a safety strip minimum distance of 10 feet.

3. In woods, this strip must be cleared down to the mineral soil to lessen the chances of an errant spark escaping into the woods and starting a forest fire.

4. All fires must not be left unattended for any period of time, and must be totally extinguished when tending is finished.

5. Anyone caught breaking the law can be charged with a misdemeanor, fined up to $300, and held liable for costs of fighting the fire and any damage the fire may have caused to others’ property.

In April 2010, the number of forest fires and the number of acres burned increased dramatically from 108 fires and 773 acres on April 1 to 283 fires and 8,457 acres on April 9. Since the burning ban began on April 10, an additional 105 fires were reported and 3,158 acres have been burned.

For the year so far, 388 fires have burned 11,615 acres statewide.

For more information, visit the Division of Forestry’s Web site at www.wvforestry.com.