Archive for work

SCOD as a Way of Life

Posted in Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Interviews, SCOD Status Update Reports, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2019 by Drogo

Why SCOD works for me  – SCOD is not one specific place, it can be anywhere that fits it; more importantly SCOD is a way of life or thinking and being. I spent most of my life helping other people with their visions, mainly bosses, clients, or my parents where we had a property that combined our creations, but now that we sold our property im finally getting a chance to express my own thoughts with my work, so im content so long as i can do that. I like documenting the good work of others in communities for SCOD, and while i do it i see what fits with me. SCOD gives me a chance to investigate places without too much pressure to give up everything to join them, being a guest for a limited time seems sensible with low risk. My dedication is to my work, sometimes in cooperation with other partners in SCOD, or my own place again, if i find what fits me. SCOD villages of the future would be adaptable enough for all kinds of personalities and social situations, to allow places for permanent and transient flux sustainability. Until more potential for renewable energy with guaranteed basic living rights is realized in more places (in part thanks to more scod collabs); a safe bed-room, transport, and communication is all i need to live my adventure. – Drogo 2019

“Go out there and find the ones who have not given up on dreaming of a better tomorrow.” – Tomorrow Land

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Aeyla Interview

Posted in Interviews, jobs, POB Audio, Services, Sales or Trade, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on June 20, 2017 by Drogo

1 – name & title’ (ie Aeyla the Health Care Healer)

2 – what does love, or the drive to help other feel like, regardless of pay?

3 – What funds your career, and what would lead to a more Star Trek utopian future ideal for health care?

4 – How many types of disability, and to what degree of severity, do you serve?

5 – Are there equilibrium equations to calculate how many clients or pets can be cared for sustainably on various budgets?

SCOD Economic Theory Series

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Economics, Multimedia Communication, Organic Development, Philosophy, Politics, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 3, 2017 by Drogo

Essays on Educational, Employment, and Systemic Economic Problems and Solutions

by Drogo Empedocles; May 2017

In 2017 I am producing a series of recordings and essays on ‘SCOD Economics’. This Economic series includes interviews and biographies across disciplines, and intends to address both present injustices and futurist hopes. We will discuss injustice within our educational and political system, that adversely affects people with alternative thoughts or theories that are not accepted by the conventional establishment corporate ideology frame-work that contains and controls most of the World. We are given their propaganda that “we can all have any job we want, so long as we try hard and get good grades”. Our reality based on my experience is more like “most of us can have at least a minimum-wage job with few benefits, for a limited amount of time, without job security, pathetic interest for savings accounts, the job we find may be against our own interests, and those who cannot get good grades or are bad at following orders get nothing and will probably end up in jail or homeless”. Despite these problems which I have personally witnessed and experienced, the final goal of the series is to plan for a better more sustainable tomorrow for future generations; even if the series conclusions are largely ignored within our life-times.

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SCOD Economic Permaculture & Futurist Interviews:

Tom the Data Scientist, Libertarian

Cheri M. the Permaculturalist

Beamer the Scientist, Liberal

Aeyla the Care Giver, Independent

Scorpion the Homeless, Independent

Drogo the Architect, Green

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SCOD Economic Commentaries:

My Favorite Job Was Teaching

How Crony-Capitalism Affects Education

Homeless Ways of Life

Public Art and Street Teaching

Alternative Economic Education

Graduate School Politics in Colleges & University

Permaculture in Economics, Business, & Politics

Quest For Consciousness

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References:

Economics Professor Mark Blyth

Economics Professor Wolff

MIT Professor Noam Chomsky

(Page Under Construction – links and more will be added soon)

Appreciation of Art

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Crafts, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on March 15, 2017 by Drogo

It is impossible to know which people will like what, when I make a work of art. For me, I make what I want to create or provide for others, and if at least one other person values what I do enough to help me to live and keep creating, then I am as successful as I can be, on my own terms.

I can believe that my work is good using self-esteem, but experience has taught me humility with gambling on predictions that involve the ‘fickle’ human. If I have spent hours working on a project, of course I would like it to be valued by others, and at the very least my friends. However, in a society that places monetary value on some products that seem to have no quality, while neglecting most human lives as ‘worthless’, I can say with conviction that I do not know what I can make, that some one else cannot make better or cheaper in their own way. Who am I to say that they should not desire their own work or the work of someone else over mine? I am me, and all I can do is what I am able to do.

Thank you for any support you give to artists of any kind!!!

Self-Employed

Posted in Economics, jobs, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on August 26, 2016 by Drogo

Some of us do NOT fit into regular jobs, and it is the job of large companies not to be fair, or even to pick the best quality, but in fact their job is to reject most people according to their opinions; so we need people like you to help share our arts with others, as part of an organic market system.

Being self-employed it is much harder to handle difficult clients that are unappreciative and do not want to pay; regardless of whether they could or could not do a better job if they did it themselves. Some let you waste hours of time, before they say they will do it themselves or hire someone else. Often because they refuse to talk on the phone about negotiating problems, because they do not have the patience to compromise their willful egos, or they just dont care. Some people do not know what they want, but when you show them, they know they dont want what you made. Control freak clients are not always right, they are to be avoided unless they pay upfront.

If you are confident that you know your limits, insist on taking the time to explain everything to clients up front. Some will lie and say they understand, when they really do not; but you will find out later. As soon as it becomes clear time-after-time, or from a major power-play that things could end up in law-suits in the court-room with lawyers and judges, it is time to end work as fairly as possible.

So please sympathize with those of us that need to maintain our own limits, and cannot abide the authority of others, unless pay is substantial. Share our work with others, as it is the only way to by-pass the cut-throat system. Otherwise, we fall through the cracks of civilization.

 As some authors of ethical business suggest, when a potential client turns us down, imagine that they have just paid 20 bucks and warned us not to work with them. In this way, we can thank them for saving us gas money and stress in the future. It is often best to “Wish them well” (Rush), and “Carry on” (Kansas).

Bullshit Jobs

Posted in Book Reports, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 29, 2016 by Drogo

Summary of an Article on Bullshit Jobs

There is another scholar doing research on a question I have been asking for years.

Why after thousands of years of civilization, with all our modern technology and complex sociology and even despite higher educations, do most of us have less ‘free time’ than ever before? It does seem as though we are slaves to the ‘machine’ of the systems of society.

“Rather than allowing a massive reduction of working hours to free the world’s population to pursue their own projects, pleasures, visions, and ideas, we have seen the ballooning not even so much of the ‘service’ sector as of the administrative sector, up to and including the creation of whole new industries like financial services or telemarketing, or the unprecedented expansion of sectors like corporate law, academic and health administration, human resources, and public relations. And these numbers do not even reflect on all those people whose job is to provide administrative, technical, or security support for these industries, or for that matter the whole host of ancillary industries (dog-washers, all-night pizza deliverymen) that only exist because everyone else is spending so much of their time working in all the other ones. These are what I propose to call ‘bullshit jobs.’ what does it say about our society that it seems to generate an extremely limited demand for talented poet-musicians, but an apparently infinite demand for specialists in corporate law? (Answer: if 1% of the population controls most of the disposable wealth, what we call “the market” reflects what they think is useful or important, not anybody else.) in our society, there seems a general rule that, the more obviously one’s work benefits other people, the less one is likely to be paid for it. Clearly, the system was never consciously designed”; but the way things are does serve the 1%, and a simmering resentment is fostered against anyone whose work has clear and undeniable social value or appeal. “It emerged from almost a century of trial and error. But it is the only explanation for why, despite our technological capacities, we are not all working 3-4 hour days.”

– David Graeber is a Professor of Anthropology at the London School of Economics. His most recent book is, ‘The Democracy Project: A History, a Crisis, a Movement’.

Analysis of Apostles of Success

Posted in Book Reports, Critical Commentary of Civilization, Economics, History with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 15, 2013 by Drogo

Apostles of the Self-Made Man: Changing Concepts of Success in America

1965 book by John G. Cawelti – University of Chicago Phoenix Press – 280 pages

 Success

SUMMARY

This is a book about the popular culture of success in America. It discusses natural qualities of character, education, values, and needs of individuals and society. It is a decent American history of changing concepts of success; with a focus on three main sources: historic individuals, fictional figures, and manual guides. It uses literature as a source to reference social history.

In spite of their persistent devotion to the idea of success, Americans have differed greatly in the way they defined it. That is the subject of this book. – p.3

Though the self-made man wasn’t an American invention, Americans have cherished the notion of someone rising out of poverty and, through hard work and dedication, achieving at least a moderate amount of wealth and respect. Purely American icons such as Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson each wrote about the opportunity for anyone in a fluid American class system to grow through their own power towards a particular position in society. Yet, much like Abraham Lincoln in the tumultuous ante-bellum period and the Gilded Age’s robber barons, the self-made man appeared most notably in times of rapid change and transition . – C.1

Three Strands of American Success

  1. Religious – Protestant Work Ethic and pious morality

  2. Economic – wealth = success

  3. Complex Individual and Social Ethics and Dreams, often combining the first 2 stands

American society saw three main versions of the self-made man emerge in epitomizing the ideal of success. The first focused on a Protestant notion of “piety, frugality, and diligence” in fulfilling the duties of one’s occupation. This version suggested that a static, stable social order existed in which success was the attainment of respectability in this world and led to the assurance of salvation in the world to come. As strict Protestantism gave way to other, secular notions of success, this ideal began to fade away.

The second tradition placed a premium on a more economic emphasis of success. While the first focused on religious notions of grace and propriety, the second enlisted the purely lay qualities of aggressiveness, competitiveness, and forcefulness. As industrialization swept over the United States in the Gilded Age and beyond, people prescribed to this ideal of success beyond the scope of religion. The hierarchical structure of many new corporations demanded such qualities from their employees if they hoped to “climb the ladder of success.” The third type of success, was a combination of the former two; taking ethics and humility from religious loyalty, in an existential industrial work environment.

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For more of the report, click on the link here for SCOD Gallery Report with Chapter Links!

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