Archive for historical

Appalachian Rap Music

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Cooperatives / Communities / Networks / Travels, Music Reviews, POB Audio with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 1, 2013 by Drogo

Yes there are black people in West Virginia; and they are not afraid of representing their home State WV!! In fact the first free black college in America was in Harpers Ferry, WV; Storer College. From a rich African-American cultural heritage mixed with white Caucasians for generations; some have been rapping and recording their music for over decades now since MTV began. Although modern multi-media has affected cultural style and subject matter, it does not replace their heritage; rather there is an evolution of expression. In the Harpers Ferry area, some renaissance men have been leading and waging an under-ground musical revolution. In Harpers Ferry there is an historic tradition of revolution.

One such Harpers Ferry musical revolutionary from black-roots is Donald Greene. Together with his circle of friends (many local), they have been doing their thing… all the while having fun. These artists have had to wear many hats to pay bills and play artistically. These new pioneers are artists, musicians, producers, writers, film-makers, and more.

There is no public funding or venue to sell what they do, yet they do it just to do it.

Here we will explore Interviews, Albums, and other aspects of Appalachian Rap Music.

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Freestyle 2006 audio cassette tape “John Brown n Shadows” – JB, Arob, Mike Fields, Paul

A: JB & Arob (14 tracks): Sycamore, Union Street, Union Freestyle, Showbiz Ridin, Metamorfosiz, Fight Klub, Rambone Shaka, Billigoat Gruff, Dungeon Kreep, Transformuz, Shadow Talknik, Frak Niggas, Ladies Bombaz (Brown Shugga), Booty Shake, Caribbean Rap

B: Beat Boxing w Paul (3 tracks); Slugging w Mike Fields (5 tracks): Thug Snappa, Robo Pirates, Gonna Get It On, Tree Thugga, Circus Dont Stop; JB & Arob (3 Reggae Beat tracks); Local Party recording (w Keith, Doug, DG, Deena, etc)

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24 Tracks 2007 : JB Codiak & Arob

 

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AMM 2013 : Appalatian Mountain Malitia

AMM Intro, AMM Anthem, Return of JB, What it Is, Morbit, Serial Killa, Dark Echoes, JB Fort, Jeff Rock, In God’s Hands

 

 

 

 

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Historic Paganism and Human Sacrifice

Posted in History, Pagan, Religions with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 5, 2013 by Drogo

Ancient writers were always accusing enemy cultures of evil deeds. This type of propaganda is still used today, as evident with main-stream news networks. While the ancients made many factual detailed accounts, there is no doubt that as humans they were just as fallible to influences as we are today. Historians today seem unable to cite any substantial archeology to defend the Greek, Roman, or Jewish claims that their enemies conducted mass human sacrifices; at least by our traditional literal definition of Satanic ritual human sacrifice. There is no conclusive evidence regarding human sacrifice in Celtic or Canaanite history, anymore than in early Greek, Roman, or Jewish history.

Rumors about enemies executing criminals, assisted suicides, or cremation of dead bodies were easily labeled simply as ‘sacrifice’ because rituals were overseen by priests. These manipulated rumors were spread by a few select literate sources to an already biased audience ignorant about barbarian culture. With no counter-culture period writings, we cannot believe the accusing texts at surface value, despite the appearance of fairness due to some compliments or rhetorical claims.

Sacrificing human lives during a war or battle certainly happened, and continues to happen in military conflicts and secular fights today. There are religious aspects to conflict sacrifices, but are more related to fighting, war, and secular killing in general. Conflict sacrifice deserves its own essay; regarding suicide, decapitation, cannibalism, and other practices before, during, and after fighting or hunting.

The Hebrew Torah references human child sacrifice in ancient Egypt, Israel, & Canaan. When the Torah mentions child sacrifice in terms of the first born sons of Israel, it is considered an acceptable metaphor, or symbolic ritual rite of passage into religious service. Curiously the Torah does not make a detailed account of Hebrew child sacrifice when Moses says “’With a mighty hand the LORD brought us out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery. When Pharaoh stubbornly refused to let us go, the LORD killed every firstborn in Egypt, both man and animal. This is why I sacrifice to the LORD the first male offspring of every womb and redeem each of my firstborn sons’.” – Exodus 13:14

I believe by the time of Moses, most cultures that practiced human sacrifice had a concept of sacrifice as a ‘tax payment’ to a higher authority. In Israel they ‘sacrificed’ their first born sons to the higher authority of the Jewish Temple Priests, in the name of God. In Canaan they ‘sacrificed’ their children to the higher authority of the Babylonian Temple Priests of Ba’al. Canaanite rituals probably included rites-of-passage where their youth passed through sacred flames (fire baptism), as existed in many other cultures from Egypt to America. First born sons were sacrificed by parents, meaning they gave them over to the priests in the service of a Temple. In Egypt the lambs’ blood on the doors meant that they had already sacrificed lambs to God, so they did not owe him their sons. This trade of sacrifice is known as Consecrated Redemption, which is described later in the Torah (Numbers 3:49).

In modern times we do use the term ‘sacrifice’ when describing military service, and patriotic parents accept this sacrificial concept of duty to the nation. We also use the word ‘sacrifice’ when following strict religious restrictions; giving up one thing for another higher blessing. My argument is that the origins of our modern definition of ‘sacrifice’ was possibly started during the time of Abraham, when God told him he could sacrifice a lamb instead of his son. By the time of Moses, sacrifice (even human sacrifice), meant trading one valuable asset to an authority, to insure the blessing of another. So when the Torah refers to sacrifice, it is referring to the established traditional ritual metaphor.

The ritual metaphor of human sacrifice relating to death, was often over-emphasized as political propaganda for their intended audience. It is much easier to reject the practices of others, if we believe them to be repulsive. Sacrificing sons (giving money to priests) may have been a tax on the parents for being able to keep their child; as with livestock God demands a sacrifice, but you can exchange one animal for another, or the monetary equivalent. In the New Testament Jesus was worth sacrificing a dove to the Temple. Jesus later became the ultimate human sacrifice when he died for our sins, so that no one needed to give sacrifices to the Temple anymore, because he said through him we can ask God directly for forgiveness, and he paid the price of sin for all. This was very popular with poor people, since they often could not afford the price of sacrifices. Also the sacrifice tax may have been intended as population control.

Another problem with biblical terms, is that Canaanites and Israelites were ethnically similar by the Second Temple period (Job 40:30, Proverbs 31:24). In archaeological and linguistic terms, the kingdoms of Israel and Judah were a subset of Canaanite culture. The disdain for Canaanites in the Torah was related to the semantic use of the word Canaanite as a synonym for merchant or trader who does business with Babylon. Clearly the Jewish Temple Priests did not like outside religious influence, as it was threatening their power and diminishing their sacrifice (tax) income.

Regarding literal historical Pagan human sacrifice by American Aztec Priests, and some Native Asian Islander cannibalism, there is more evidence that they actually did kill many humans to appease the gods or gain their powers. Despite this fact, human sacrifice is not mandated by main-stream Neo-Pagans today in any form. Human sacrifice for salvation is generally rejected by New-Age ideology, as salvation typically comes from within and is achieved through self-realization, without the need to contribute to an institution or higher authority. Most people do not like to pay taxes anyway.

christ recycles

Historical Modern Genocides

Posted in Critical Commentary of Civilization, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on July 21, 2012 by Drogo

Modern Governments, Wars, and Leaders Caused these death-tolls:

50+ million dead: Mao Ze-Dong (China & Tibet 1949-70)
12+ million dead: Adolf Hitler (Germany, 1939-1945) – concentration camps, civilian deaths and POWs
8+ million dead: Leopold II of Belgium (Congo, 1886-1908)
6+ million dead: Jozef Stalin (USSR, 1932-39)
5+ million dead: Hideki Tojo (Japan, 1941-44)
2+ million dead: Ismail Enver (Turkey, 1915-22)
1.7 million dead: Pol Pot (Cambodia, 1975-79)
1.6 million dead: Kim Il Sung (North Korea, 1948-94)
1.5 million dead: Menghistu (Ethiopia, 1975-78)
1 million dead: Yakubu Gowon (Biafra, 1967-1970)
900,000 dead: Leonid Brezhnev (Afghanistan, 1979-1982)
800,000 dead: Jean Kambanda (Rwanda, 1994)

* Native American genocides number in the millions, but are harder to estimate.

Hilltop Hotel Ruins 2010

Posted in Historic Architecture, Organic Architecture, Sustainability with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 23, 2010 by Drogo

Hilltop Hotel Ruins 2010


Multi-Million Dollar Terrorists did this, by purchasing the Hotel and then without negotiation, condemning it. Then without talking to the architect of the 2000 Master Plan, designed something 3x the size (from scale drawings) after this is demolished.

Oh and removing a central beam from the porch without replacing it helped alot. Why not help demolition along? Holding a landmark property hostage, without real negotiation of design, it is treated as disposable for corporate greed. It shows disdain for the local community, common among out-of-town big-buck investors.

So much for historic preservation and a place for lower income people to visit (like Appalachian Trail Hikers). So much for the Presidential Green Award that was given to the Hotel in the 1990’s. So much for Sustainable Maintenance improvements and designs. So much for Environmental Eco-Cabins, earth-sheltered into the historic hillside. So much for local architects being respected.

Hello Bribes!

Welcome Bubble economics and Madeoff schemes! So long ghosts of an old building that few professionals would touch. Perhaps those ghosts will continue to haunt the grounds. Perhaps after demolition, the property will be sold to Middle Class Americans, like the original family that built it, the Lovetts. And perhaps someday, that family can start from scratch, with one house, open to all.

For the right way to handle the Hilltop House Hotel property, read this article:  The Historic Hilltop House, Revisited

Book Reviews for “Harpers Ferry Houses”

Posted in Arts (Design & Performance), Book Reports with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 15, 2010 by Drogo

These are a collection of book reviews from various people for the book Harpers Ferry Houses, by Walton D. Stowell II.

January 2010 email from a Harpers Ferry neighbor

Walton,
Loved your book! What I loved the most brought a smile to my face …. things that you said that were completely noncomformist and unexpected and true
like:
“… have weekly sacrificial garbage days. Trash is placed publicly & symbolically outside, to show how many material items have been wasted …”
” … it was difficult to understand how the NPS was really saving the town … other buildings were demolished like the Scottish Castle …”
(BTW i wld have loved to have SEEN that house)
“… colleges are over-priced but depend on expendable under-paid adjunct professors …”
“… if one is hired it’s usually because they have bribed a connection to support another obedient slave to the System …”

I liked your definitions of Self Education, and of Tourism. Your comments are trenchant —

Well, thanks again for sharing the book with me.
And keep on doin what you do!
Neal
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From Amazon.com reviews:
5.0 out of 5 stars A Historical Memory Lane, January 21, 2009
Kip and Walton Stowell have provided an incredibly extensive collection of photos of Harpers Ferry houses.
In addition to being a historic town, Harpers Ferry is also home to its residents. It remains “home” to many of us who have left. As a former resident, the book took me down memory lane. I am so impressed with Kip’s and
Walton’s foresight to have started this collection of photographs and I am judging that it is a culmination of more than 30 years work. Congratulations and thanks to Kip, Walton, and Nena.
By Pat H. Long
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5.0 out of 5 stars Over 300 B&W photos and drawings!, November 24, 2008
Authors Kip and Walton Stowell have spent many years living and designing in the Town of Harpers Ferry at Stowell Galleries. Anyone reading the book is invited to journey into the history, landscape and architecture of Harpers Ferry’s houses. Pass through Colonial, Federal, Victorian, and various Modern periods and styles in order to get a better understanding of the National Treasure that is Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. It is a street by street tour of the Town, complete with a unique Harpers Ferry architectural classification guide. The scope of this book transcends conventional architecture with essays on applied philosophy, a glossary of regional terms, and artistic images not found in other books. Plus, it’s a really cute little book!
By Noel L. Tavano